2012-06-07 Broadband Arts Initiative The Hon Simon Crean MP Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government Minister for the Arts Media Release PIONEERING ARTISTS TO EXPLORE NEXT GENERATION BROADBAND  Four artistic teams will harness the unprecedented creative possibilities of high capacity broadband with $350,000 through the Australia Council’s Broadband Arts Initiative. Arts Minister Simon Crean today announced the successful artists who will generate new art content for next generation broadband networks in Australia.  “The National Broadband Network is forging new possibilities for artists,” Mr Crean said. “It is broadening audiences for artists and providing new digital platforms for creating, sharing and presenting work.   “I have been a constant advocate and proponent for this potential, arguing that the NBN is the highway.  “The creative industries are a key part of determining the vehicles that go on the highway. The access and applications are vital.  “Selected by a panel of practicing artists as well as leaders from the broadcast, creative and gaming industries, these teams are breaking creative boundaries with projects that are only possible as a result of high speed broadband infrastructure. “For example, Terrapin Puppet Theatre has received $100,000 to use high speed broadband to stage a live simultaneous performance of children’s show ‘Shadow Dreams’ to two audiences in different locations.   “In collaboration with the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, and in a first for puppet performance, this project will feature live networked symphony performances in both locations,” he said.   Festival director Marcus Westbury has received $86,000 for the Screen Portal Project which will connect artists and audiences in real-time interactions on high definition, life-size audio visual screens in public spaces in New South Wales and the Northern Territory, as part of the 2013 International Symposium on Electronic Arts.   The City of Whittlesea, Victoria has received $100,000 for ‘Stay or Leave’ an online public artwork that will reveal the impact of natural disaster. Using the National Broadband Network, this project will work with communities to create a sonic landscape which mirrors the rapidly changing circumstances of extreme events.   Media artist Keith Armstrong has received $64,000 for ‘Long Time, No See?’ an online and installation artwork where the public will generate a vision for Australia’s long term future. This project connects with communities at early National Broadband Network release sites.     “The initiative received enormous interest from artists and arts organisations across Australia, with more than 100 expressions of interest received,” Mr Crean said.  “Such a resounding sector response demonstrates the excitement from the arts community about the possibilities of high speed broadband and the National Broadband Network to allow artists to extend artistic form, rather than just distribute content. “I commend the Australia Council for giving artists this opportunity to innovate and to find new ways of connecting with audiences.”  Media contacts Office of the Arts: Glen Atwell 0403 949 599 Australia Council for the Arts: Cameron Woods Phone 02 9215 9030  0412 686 548 Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au    Credits: Video introducing Broadband Arts Initiative grant recipients, Keith Armstrong, Terrapin Puppet Theatre, City of Whittlesea and Marcus Westbury, and their arts projects to be delivered over 2012-13. Courtesy the artists and video producer Carli Leimbach.   2012-08-09 New Chair Rupert Myer on the the contribution of the arts and culture The Australia Council's new chair Rupert Myer champions the arts in The Australian. Rupert Myer has championed the contribution the arts and culture make to Australia in his response to the article by Adam Creighton in The Weekend Australian (4-5 August). He argues that the creation of new artistic works and their presentation in arts institutions such as galleries, museums and theatres represents an important investment in our nation’s creative capital and a significant contribution to its GDP He also pushes aside some of the misconceptions about arts funding in Australia, particularly the historical evolution, as well as the level of scrutiny placed upon Government investment in arts and culture, cautioning that if such misconceptions go unchecked they risk impacting upon policy decisions. You can read Rupert Myer's entire article on Artery. 2012-08-28 Get the music facts Art Facts: Music, a new digital resource from the Australia Council for the Arts, tells the story of music in numbers. It brings together facts, figures and research from across the music sector and, through an interactive website, will inspire people to discover and share facts about music, sparking quality debate.Art Facts: Music is structured around five key elements of the music ecosystem: creation; industry; global trade; participation; funding and public support. It brings together research from APRA | AMCOS, ARIA, PPCA, Live Performance Australia, Music Council of Australia, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and others, allowing people to find it in one place and compare the figures in new ways. “There’s a wealth of facts and figures on the music industry out there, but it’s in so many different locations – not all of which are readily known or accessible to everyone in the music sector,” says Kathy Keele, CEO of the Australia Council for the Arts. “Art Facts brings this together. It’s a rich resource for deepening our understanding of the sector learning more about its size, scope, issues and opportunities.” “Art Facts: Music illustrates the enduring importance of the music industry to Australia both culturally and economically,” says Kathy. “And as new data is released, it can be added to Art Facts, creating a definitive gateway for research, facts and figures on the music industry.” Matthew Hindson, Chair of the Australia Council Music Board says “there is a multitude of information here, a kaleidoscope of facts - each fact deserving its own analysis and provoking us to consider who makes music, who listens to it, who makes the money and who doesn’t.” “You can really see the pervasiveness of music,” says Matthew. “Almost everyone makes music part of their everyday lives – as listeners or performers, as audience members and hobbyists - all of which makes music simultaneously remarkable and something that is easily taken for granted.” “Art Facts: Music also demonstrates the resilience of the music industry, how it defies recent tougher financial times with Australian households spending $2 billion on music each year,” says Matthew. “Australians are buying 100 million recordings per year and live music brings over 42 million fans into Australia’s pubs and clubs.” “The music industry itself is going through a consumer-lead digital revolution, with spending on digital music set to overtake CD sales in 2012 as fans buy more music online, and embrace subscription services.” “Seeing the sheer size and scale of the music industry laid out is impressive,” says Matthew.  “But in stark contrast, the median creative income for professional musicians is only $7,200 a year.” Music is the first sector to go under the spotlight in the Australia Council’s Art Facts project. The website will grow to include key facts about all artforms, with other artforms being added throughout 2013. Art Facts will become a permanent resource for learning more about Australian arts through data and analysis.    Art Facts: Music is available at http://artfacts.australiacouncil.gov.au Media contactCameron Woods 02 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2012-09-11 Next Wave announced as JUMP Mentoring Industry Partner        The Australia Council is excited to announce we will be partnering with Next Wave to deliver Jump Mentoring in 2013. The newly expanded program supports creative practitioners in the early stages of their careers to work on an applied mentorship and creative project with a mentor who helps them jump to the next level. Based in Melbourne, Next Wave supports emerging artists to take creative risks, establish critically-engaged professional practices and launch their work into a wider artistic and public domain through development programs and a curated biennial festival. As the industry partner Next Wave will be delivering a dynamic mentorship induction and skills intensive for recipients of Jump and providing support throughout the duration of the mentorship. “We think this model of collaboration between industry and government is terrific; partly for how well it channels money directly to early career artists, and now - curators, editors, producers and collectives. This is a big moment for Next Wave. We are thrilled to be sharing our rigorous and sought-after development approach with more, and different, people.” Emily Sexton, Artistic Director Kath Melbourne, Program Director, ArtStart says “The partnership represents the core strengths of both organisations. The Australia Council is providing its resources effectively to the robust tasks of application, assessment and acquittal while harnessing the talents of Next Wave to deliver timely, relevant and dynamic professional development opportunities to participants on the ground. We hope that this partnership gleans new networks and new opportunities for participants for years to come” The new website for Jump Mentoring has just been launched and applications are now are now open. Applications close 19 October 2012. For Further information on how to apply for JUMP please contact: Laura Naimo Program Officer, Early Career Artists and Producers Programs Phone 02 9215 9129, Email l.naimo@australiacouncil.gov.au 2012-09-20 Achievements in community arts celebrated Pioneering community and cultural artist Meme McDonald will be awarded the prestigious Ros Bower Award, worth $50,000, for an outstanding, life-long contribution to community arts and cultural development.The Kirk Robson Award will also be presented to Mohammed Ahmad and Anna Weekes. The $10,000 award recognises outstanding leadership from young people working in community arts and cultural development, particularly in the areas of reconciliation and social justice. The awards are presented at the 2012 Australia Council Community Arts and Cultural Development Awards, held in Melbourne’s Abbotsford Convent tonight, an opportunity for the sector to gather and celebrate the inspiring work and excellent art from this field. For over 30 years Meme McDonald has been working in community arts and cultural development as a director, writer, photographer, installation artist, author and filmmaker. As founder of one of Australia’s first community theatres – West Theatre Company in the western suburbs of Melbourne in 1979 – and its artistic director for eight years, Meme has been one of Australia’s pioneers in the development of community based arts and the role of the professional artist. Recently, she was artistic director for CONNECTING IDENTITIES, City of Geelong’s three year project as part of the national GENERATIONS project. Meme was also the artistic advisor of the national project. Her leadership role on this project encouraged artists working in Charters Towers in North Queensland, Liverpool in Western Sydney, La Trobe Valley and Wangaratta in regional Victoria, to tackle large issues of concern to their communities. “As a community artist, Meme continues to lead the field with innovative projects and the influence of her practice on many artists is well recognised,” says Kathy Keele, CEO of the Australia Council. ”Whether working in circus tents, housing estates, or in a North Queensland Rainforest the work she does matters to communities and her ideas remain fresh, engaging and profound,” says Kathy. Meme has a sustained commitment to working collaboratively with Indigenous communities, leaders, artists and elders; inviting Indigenous perspective and contribution wherever projects are based, not only in regionally based projects in Darwin, Katherine, Alice Springs, but where she lives and works in Melbourne. Of significance is her 15 year collaboration with Aboriginal storyteller Boori Monty Pryor. Together they have authored six books with the involvement of elders, family members and community from the Kunggandji and Birri Gubba nations, Far North Queensland. These books have been groundbreaking in that they are collaborative works, community based, and have been published by Australia’s leading independent publisher, Allen and Unwin to critical acclaim. Kirk Robson Award recipient Mohammed Ahmad is a community arts and cultural development artist, writer, editor and actor. He is chief editor of the BYDS literary program Westside Publications. Mohammed is passionately dedicated to providing a voice to the people of Western Sydney and to get past the stereotypes that are often presented, particularly around Middle Eastern and Indigenous residents of the area. In 2005 he revived Westside, the publication produced by BYDS, seeing its potential to make real change in the lives of young people from Southwest Sydney. Under Mohammed’s guidance it was transformed into the only publishing program in Australia that exclusively recognises the works of emerging and established Western Sydney artists. Westside Publications produces ongoing literary anthologies including Westside Literary Journal and Westside Jr., as well as a number of performance events, video projects, workshops and residencies. Mohammed has produced events in the past six Sydney Writers’ Festivals and most recently edited the publication On Western Sydney, the second collection in a new series from Westside Publications. “Mohammed recognised that the absence of voices from Western Sydney was a gap in the Australian literary landscape,” says Kathy Keele. “Through his publications, workshops and events he has fostered a literary culture in Western Sydney fuelled by the community itself.” “As a cultural leader and role model he has instigated tangible change and we can expect the legacy of his extraordinary body of community based arts practice to have an impact well into the future.” As an actor, Mohammed has performed in Urban Theatre Projects' Fast Cars and Tractor Engines (2004 -2005) and Stories of Love and Hate (2008 & 2011). He also performed in the Belvoir Theatre production I'm Your Man for the 2012 Sydney Festival. Fellow Kirk Robson Award recipient is Darwin-based, Anna Weekes, whose work in community arts and cultural development has seen her working with some of the most vulnerable communities both here in Australia, and also in Vanuatu and Cambodia. In Australia, Anna has been working with Darwin’s homeless population through projects like Ten Swags and Arts in the Long Grass, a fortnightly event where homeless people (long grassers) gather to eat a nutritious meal, create art and reconnect with their land. An annual exhibition of all of the artists is now an iconic event on the Darwin arts calendar. Through these programs Anna works with the Aboriginal community at all levels – people diagnosed with mental health conditions, alcoholic and trauma-affected people, with elderly and frail people, with children and with established and emerging artists. Matching enthusiasm with empathy, she has provided a space for healing and reconnecting. She has also worked with newly arrived refugees through projects including the My Sister’s Kitchen program, an increasingly successful food, art and craft program run with women and families who have recently been offered residency in Australia. “One of the powerful attributes of Anna’s work is its humanising quality,” says Kathy. “Through her collaborations, we get to see the people whom are too often overlooked or, in some cases, treated with contempt.” “A testament to the quality of her work is that many of her projects have continued to grow and flourish, long after she has moved on to new ones.”  2012 Australia Council Community Arts and Cultural Development Awards 6.00–9.00pm, Friday 21 September 2012, Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford, Victoria (map).   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (130 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the 2012 Australia Council Community Arts and Cultural Development Awards contact: Cameron WoodsCommunications Adviser Phone 02 9215 9030, 0412 686 548, Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2012-10-16 Celebrating 20 years of residencies with Time & Vision Over the past 20 years Acme Studios, London, has hosted 70 Australian artists in residence, supported by the Australia Council for the Arts, resulting in an extraordinary body of work and career building opportunities.Time & Vision is a major project celebrating this milestone; highlighting the range and vitality of contemporary Australian visual art through a publication, exhibition, film and online platform. It demonstrates how important it is to give artists time, space and resources to make new work in different surroundings. Through personal testimonies from the artists, including  Aleks Danko, Sue Pedley, Fiona Hall, Sally Smart and Tom Polo; Time & Vision reveals how these residencies provided the participating artists with time to ‘develop new ideas and experiment’, the ‘luxury’ of thoroughly immersing themselves in research, offered ‘treasured moments’ and demonstrated how ‘a few months can support years of practice’. “Turning the pages of the publication, it’s a pleasure to watch the residency program unfold over twenty years,” says Ted Snell, Chair of the Australia Council Visual Arts board. “The great benefit in artist residency programs is clear and perhaps best articulated in the words of Jo Flynn, who in the publication says, ‘what studios do, is allow a deep infection to set in: I’ve never quite shaken it’.” Accompanying the Time & Vision publication is, an exhibition curated by Paul Bayley, presented at the Bargehouse on the Southbank, a perfect backdrop for the experimental and hybrid practices that are evident and strong in Australian visual arts. New work includes: Paul Knight’s large-scale photographic pieces; a site-specific sculpture inspired by the building’s former use as a manufacturer of egg products by Lyndall Phelps; an audience participation painting performance piece by Tom Polo; Sally Smart will be creating a new wall piece; a performative video by Daniel von Sturmer; and a site-specific installation that incorporates ceramic sculptures and paintings by Michelle Ussher. Artists recreating, showing recent work, or exhibiting works in London for the first time are Daniel Crooks, Nicole Ellis, Patrick Hartigan, Jacki Middleton, Vanilla Netto, Helen Pynor, Erica Seccombe, Renee So and Kathy Temin. In 1992 the Australia Council became the first national cultural body to form an international residencies partnership with Acme Studios. The exhibition reflects the new internationalism showcasing Australian talent operating successfully overseas. “The Australia Council for the Arts is delighted to support Acme in organising this unprecedented exploration of Australian artists work over the past twenty years. The publication is an important document of their achievements, creates the context for future discussion about artists residencies and makes visible what goes on behind studio doors,” Says Ted “I would like to thank the artists whose creative vision has been at the core of Time & Vision, it’s been an honour to support a roll call of some of the most interesting Australian artists of our time.”   The Time & Vision publication is officially launched at the exhibition private view on Tuesday 23 October 2012, by His Excellency Mr. John Dauth AO LVO, High Commissioner for Australia. It is available for purchase through the Time & Vision online platform: http://vaaus.co.uk Media contactCameron Woods 02 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au  2012-10-18 [imi] Innovation Artist Placements and Workshop [imi] is a research project that examines the role creative innovation plays in the context of interactive media entertainment and to explore how successful companies in this space derive and exploit creative inspiration. Artist Placements Interactive Media Innovation [imi] are looking for artists for paid placements in a range of interactive media companies in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. The [imi] Artist Placements are opportunities for selected artists to spend up to 8 weeks working in one of [imi]‘s Industry Partner Interactive Media companies where they may contribute to the development of ideas, observe processes, or develop partnerships, prototypes or pitches for future projects. Applications close 31 October. Placement would take place between December 2012 and May 2013.   For more information check out the website or complete an expression of interest.  Workshops The [imi] Artist Workshops are single days, one in each city, where artists and interactive entertainment company representatives will meet and engage in professional development and creative play. These day-long sessions combine dissemination of information about arts and interactive entertainment to all participants, with exercises for brainstorming innovative, original interactive ideas. Limited spaces are available for the [imi] Artist Workshops held in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. Sydney: Friday November 30th 2012 Brisbane: Monday December 3rd 2012 Melbourne: Wednesday December 5th 2012 For more information check out the website or complete an expression of interest.  [imi] ~ interactive media innovation ~ is funded by the Australian Research Council and the Australia Council for the Arts. 2012-10-24 Touring update and FAQs On 22 August 2012 the Minister for the Arts, the Hon Simon Crean MP, announced the transfer of a number of touring programs to the Australia Council. The programs are: Playing Australia, Visions of Australia and the Contemporary Touring Initiative, Festivals Australia, and the Contemporary Music Touring Program.   The Australia Council has established a National Touring team within the Arts Development Division. Our team combines strong experience in museums, galleries, libraries and performing arts. Funding decisions will be made by peer panels with appropriate expertise to assess the applications. Some of these programs are now open for applications, with others to open shortly. We look forward to working with a broad range of arts organisations and venues throughout Australia as we administer these programs and will keep you informed of any developments. You can find information on these programs at http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/touring and there are some FAQs below. Who will manage the grants within the Australia Council? Arts Development will administer Visions of Australia and the Contemporary Touring Initiative, Playing Australia, and Festivals Australia. The Australia Council’s Music Board will administer the Contemporary Music Touring Program. Who will assess the rounds? The Australia Council will appoint appropriate skills-based panels. We will ensure panels have required expertise and sector knowledge. Panellists will conform to Australia Council Peer Guidelines.  What are the key dates? Visions of Australia round 39 opens 23 October 2012, closes 30 November 2012 Playing Australia round 41 opens 23 October 2012, closes 30 November 2012 Contemporary Music Touring Program round 24 opens 26 October 2012, closes 3 December 2012 The Australia Council will also open Festivals Australia: Festivals Australia round 35 opens 23 October 2012, closes 23 November 2012 How do I apply? The Australia Council uses an on line application process for all grants. Application forms will be found on the Australia Council site as per opening round dates above.   - Playing Australia - Festivals Australia - Visions of Australia and Contemporary Touring Initiative Application forms for the Contemporary Music Touring Program will be available online shortly. The grant system enables support material to be attached in electronic form www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants Will the guidelines change? The guidelines for the current rounds will largely remain unchanged; this includes support material requirements. Who do I contact about the programs? Please call Toll-free 1800 226 912 if you have questions regarding the programs. Playing Australia, Visions of Australia and the Contemporary Touring Initiative, Festivals Australia: Penny Miles, Program Manager National Touring Tara Kita, Program Officer. Contemporary Music Touring Program: Andy Rantzen, Program Manager Music. If you have questions regarding previous rounds decisions or contracts please refer: to the following fact sheets: Contemporary Music Touring Program: Fact Sheet Playing Australia: Fact Sheet Visions of Australia and Contemporary Touring Initiative: Fact Sheet Festivals Australia: Fact Sheet For further information regarding dates and guidelines: www.australiacouncil.gov.au/touring 2012-10-29 Australian arts and culture central in Asian Century The Australia Council for the Arts welcomes today’s release of the Australia in the Asian Century White Paper, by the Prime Minister Julia Gillard at the Lowy Institute. The paper calls on all Australians to boost their understanding of our region's history, culture and customs and urges a boost for Asian languages in Australia's schools and universities. It lays out a series of pathways for Australian arts, artists and cultural institutions to play a pivotal role in building our relationships and networks across our region. “The Australia Council’s engagement with Asia must increasingly build deep cultural interconnections between our nation and our neighbours,” says Rupert Myer, Chair of the Australia Council. “It is our view that the presence of Australian arts in Asia is a compelling sometimes underutilised asset that makes a substantial contribution to strengthening Australia’s economic, political and cultural objectives.” “The Australia Council works to build strong two way relationships over the long term ­- the Council’s relationships across the incredibly diverse region of Asia require sustained effort and investment,” says Rupert. “More and more, Australian artists are working with peers in Asia and we envisage new artistic collaborations and experiences.” The foundations have been well laid for the exchanges of artistic and cultural traditions between Australian and Asian artists and organisations, bolstered by investments in touring and artist residencies by the Australia Council and Asialink Arts among other agencies. Australia’s artists and arts companies – across the performing arts, visual arts and literature – have made strong inroads into the region’s cultural markets and have developed an impressive network of relationships. Kathy Keele, CEO of the Australia Council says, “The opportunities for the arts and culture in Asia are not only for immediate market-driven outcomes but also enduring relationships grounded on reciprocity, cultural exchange and a sharing of aesthetic traditions and practices.” “We welcome Arts Minister Crean’s initiatives to lead even closer collaboration between the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australia International Cultural Council, Screen Australia and other agencies to ensure we have a coordinated, highly visible impact across our region,” says Kathy. Rupert Myer concludes, “Australia’s arts and cultural sector will continue to deepen its connections with Asia’s arts communities and audiences, and its large and expanding market. With established in-roads and growing expertise, the Australia Council welcomes the Government’s focus on Asia and stands ready to contribute to the nation’s objectives in the Asian Century.” The Asian Century White Paper is available at: http://asiancentury.dpmc.gov.au/ Media contacts Brendan Wall 02 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910 b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Cameron Woods 02 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2012-11-09 Community Arts and Education Placement The Australia-Indonesia Institute (AII) in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Embassy in Jakarta, AusAID and Community Partnerships of Australia Council for the Arts are working in partnership to enable a Community Arts and Education Placement for one or more Australian community arts and cultural development (CACD) practitioners. Successful practitioners will work with two schools in Jakarta including SMA Al Izhar, a private Islamic senior school in Fatmawati and SDN 11 Pondok Labu, a government primary school in Pondok Labu on Jakarta’s outskirts.  The purpose of this placement is to work with local students, families, artists and the broader community to develop a public artwork in the built environment of the school that reflects the unique identity and culture of the school and its community. This placement is a pilot that will be independently evaluated to determine the value of CACD processes and outcomes in developing communities and education contexts. The aims of this placement are: to enable a greater sense of community ownership of, and direct engagement with, schools that have participated in the BRIDGE[i] program, enhance intercultural exchange within the school community and Australian aid agencies; share community arts and cultural development skills with local artists in Indonesia; and demonstrate Australia’s commitment to education in Indonesia. The placement budget is up to $35,000 and will cover artist(s) fees, production costs as well as travel and accommodation expenses. If required, the successful artist/s will be offered in country language and culture training. The successful artist(s) is required to collaborate with an independent evaluator to be chosen by the project partners. Selection criteria: Five years (or more) experience as a Community Arts and Cultural Development (CACD) practitioner demonstrating successful facilitation of high quality community driven processes and public art outcomes Experience working with young people and/or in an education context Leadership and skills sharing experience that would enable collaborative work with local artists in an Indonesian context Capacity to collaborate with a range of partners including evaluation partners Willingness to share results with the Australian CACD sector and project supporters including AusAID, DFAT, AII, the Australian Embassy and the Australia Council for the Arts Desirable criteria: Experience working in a developing community and/or country Knowledge of Indonesian language and/or culture Support material: All support material will be received electronically via email (j.bray@australiacouncil.gov.au). You may submit support material via a URL if this is more convenient. Artist biography for each artist involved (up to two pages each) Artistic  support material (in one of the following formats: five pages of written material, or 10 printed photographs or electronic images, or five minutes of video or sound recording, or up to three live website links [URL]) Up to five support letters (maximum of one page each) Download the application form here. All Deed Poll Waiver Release Form. 2012-11-19 CEO of the Australia Council for the Arts to depart at the end of the year Ms. Kathy Keele, Chief Executive Officer, of the Australia Council for the Arts will leave the national funding and advisory agency at the end of this year.   In making the announcement, the Australia Council’s Chair, Mr. Rupert Myer AM, paid tribute to Ms. Keele’s leadership: 'I congratulate and thank Kathy for her tireless and strategic work on behalf of the arts. She has made a transformative contribution to the Australia Council’. ‘Kathy leaves a responsive and highly capable organization. She has ensured that the Council is steadfastly committed to supporting Australian artists, companies and creativity across our nation, our region and beyond, and is at the forefront of research into the value of the arts.’ 'It has been an honour to lead the Australia Council for almost six years; however, I feel the timing is right.’ said Ms. Keele ‘It has been an extraordinary journey; from working with artists in regional and remote communities, to providing insights into how Australians are participating in the arts, to working with such a committed Governing board and executive staff. I am sad to leave; but I depart knowing that the Australia Council is delivering sustained outcomes for Australian arts and culture nationally and internationally.' ‘It has been inspiring and immensely satisfying to work closely with artists, arts professionals, the business and wider communities to support the making and appreciation of great art.' ‘I am grateful to current Chairman, Mr. Rupert Myer and previous Chair, Mr. James Strong, who have supported me and ensured that the Australia Council continues to be deeply engaged with the arts sector and the Australian public.' said Ms. Keele. Arts Minister Simon Crean thanked Ms Keele for her leadership and dedication leading the Australian Government’s principal arts funding and advisory body. "Ms Keele has managed the Australia Council at a time of major changes in the arts and broader cultural sector and helped the Council respond to it,” Mr Crean said. “She has overseen the Council during a major review process and I thank her for her contribution in setting future directions for Government support for the arts and for artists.” Mr. Myer said the Council will now commence the search for a new CEO. He also announced that Ms Libby Christie will act as CEO from January 2013. Ms. Christie is currently Executive Director of Arts Funding at the Australia Council. She is an experienced business and arts leader and was previously Managing Director of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (256.7 KB).    Contact For inquiries contact: Brendan WallPhone 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au 2012-12-06 Vale Dame Elisabeth Murdoch The Australia Council joins family members, friends and the national community to mourn the death of Dame Elisabeth Murdoch.Dame Elisabeth has been one of Australia’s most active philanthropists and passionate supporters of the arts. We take this moment to pause and reflect on her immense contribution to our national life which has been far reaching, spanning the arts and culture, health, education and community.   Her lifelong commitment to the culture of our country has assisted Australian creativity in enumerable ways. Her giving was often discrete and ongoing.  She avoided the limelight and had an unflagging commitment to ensuring that talent is fostered and fully developed.    A truly outstanding humanitarian, Dame Elisabeth Murdoch’s legacy will live on in the thousands of people her generosity has touched. We extend our deepest sympathies to the Murdoch family and to Dame Elisabeth’s many friends.   Rupert Myer AM Chair, Australia Council for the Arts 2013-02-06 Creative Partnerships Australia CEO Appointed The Australia Council for the Arts welcomes today’s appointment of Ms Fiona Menzies as Chief Executive Officer of Creative Partnerships Australia. Ms Menzies will lead the organisation which has been established to promote and support social investment in arts and culture.Creative Partnerships Australia is the single agency created through the consolidation of the Australia Council’s Artsupport Australia initiative and the Australia Business Arts Foundation (AbaF). The establishment of Creative Partnerships Australia follows recommendations in the report of the 2012 Review of Private Sector Support for the Arts, which was chaired by Mr Harold Mitchell AC. Chair of the Australia Council and board member of Creative Partnerships Australia, Mr Rupert Myer AM, says, “The Australia Council welcomes the appointment of Ms Fiona Menzies. Her extensive arts sector experience, communications and policy background, combined with her deep commitment to arts and culture will provide valuable leadership to this important new organisation.” “The Australia Council plans to work closely with Creative Partnerships Australia Chair Ms Carol Schwartz AM and Ms Menzies to extend support to the arts in Australia through philanthropy and social investment,” says Mr. Myer. “We welcome the opportunity presented through the establishment of Creative Partnerships Australia to build on the strong foundations laid through the work of Artsupport Australia and ABaF. The Australia Council is proud of the achievements of its Artsupport initiative over the past nine years and the additional financial support the program has delivered to Australia’s arts sector. Social investment is vital to build resilience and support ongoing growth of the arts sector and provides artists with opportunities to innovate, explore and create,” he says. Acting Chief Executive of the Australia Council Ms Libby Christie says: “The Australia Council looks forward to supporting Creative Partnerships Australia and sharing knowledge and experience. In collaboration with the new organisation, we have the ability to create strong, long–term partnerships which will stimulate private investment to complement public support for the arts. I look forward to working with Ms Menzies to bring additional resources to the national arts sector.”    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (101 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Gabrielle Wilson Phone 0433 972 915, Email g.wilson@australiacouncil.gov.au Brendan Wall Phone 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-03-04 Vale James Strong AO The Australia Council mourns the death in Sydney on Sunday 3 March 2013 of its former Chair Mr James Strong AO. James Strong led the Australia Council as its Chair from 2006 to 2012. He was a passionate and highly respected advocate for the arts, blending business acumen with a love for arts and culture. Prior to becoming Chair of the Australia Council, Mr Strong played an active leadership role in the arts. He made a significant contribution to the sector, serving on many arts company boards. He was a director of Opera Australia, Chair of the Sydney Theatre Company, Chair of Australian Brandenburg Orchestra and Chair of the Australia Business Arts Foundation. Mr Strong led the 2005 Orchestras Review, which resulted in the orchestras’ independence from the ABC, establishment as statutory bodies and increased investment from the federal government. He was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2006 for services to business and to the arts, as an administrator and as a philanthropist. ‘I am deeply saddened to learn of the death of James Strong. He has made an enduring contribution to the arts in Australia and will be missed by the Australian arts sector,’ said Australia Council Chair Mr Rupert Myer AM. ‘James brought a dynamic combination of corporate experience and deep passion for the arts. He was a great friend to Australia’s artists and a distinguished cultural leader.’ ‘His legacy is a strong and vibrant Australian arts sector of significant international standing.’ The Australia Council community extends deepest sympathy to his wife Jeanne-Claude, sons Nick and Sam, and James’ many friends.    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (172 KB).    Contact For inquiries about this media release contact: Brendan WallPhone 0427 689 910 , Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-03-05 Leading artist and curator win major visual arts awards Tracey Moffatt, one of Australia’s leading internationally acclaimed contemporary artists, and Juliana Engberg, Artistic Director of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) in Melbourne and Artistic Director of the forthcoming Biennale of Sydney; are being honoured today for their achievements in the arts with the Australia Council Visual Arts Award and Medal respectively. Since her groundbreaking Something More exhibition, presented at the Australian Centre for Photography in 1989, Tracey Moffatt’s work has featured in more than 100 solo exhibitions across Europe, the USA and Australia. Her work is held in the collections of some of the world’s most prestigious art museums and galleries including the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Guggenheim, Centre Pompidou and the Tate Gallery. Many of her photographs and short films have achieved iconic status both in Australia and around the world. "Tracey Moffatt’s outstanding contribution to the cultural life of this nation has been acknowledged with the 2012 Australia Council Visual Arts Award," says Mr Rupert Myer AM, Chair of the Australia Council, who is presenting the $40,000 award at an award ceremony at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) in Sydney this evening. "Tracey’s work has been critically acclaimed internationally for more than two decades, following the selection of her short film Night Cries for official competition at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival," says Mr Myer. "More recently, she was recognised with a solo exhibition of her films and videos at the Museum of Modern Art in New York." "During the intervening decades Tracey’s career has been defined by an extraordinary list of achievements. She more than fulfils the criteria of the Award to ‘inspire Australians’ through her her compelling and dynamic practice," he says. Juliana Engberg receives the $10,000 Medal for her outstanding contribution to the development of the Australian cultural sector. In a career spanning nearly 30 years of curating, teaching, talking and writing about art, Juliana Engberg continues to be at the forefront of contemporary curatorial practice. As well as curating over 400 exhibitions, she is a prolific writer and editor, having written over 1,500 articles about contemporary art in catalogues, books and journals. She is one of Australia’s most accomplished public commentators on contemporary art. "Few individuals have made such a distinguished contribution to the development of the Australian visual arts sector as Juliana Engberg," says Mr Myer. "As a curator and advocate for Australian art she has taken the work of Australian artists to the world and brought the best of international practice back to Australia. "As Artistic Director of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), in Melbourne since 2002, Juliana has brought a keen intellect and distinctive eye to the curatorial process that has enlivened the cultural scene in this country and simultaneously advanced the careers of many Australian artists". Both Engberg and Moffatt will be honoured at a ceremony at the MCA at 6PM this evening, surrounded by arts sector leaders and close family and friends. A key note address will be delivered by philanthropist and Chief Commissioner of the Venice Biennale, Simon Mordant AM.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (146 KB).      Additional information on the 2013 Australia Council Visual Arts Award and Medal: The Australia Council Visual Arts Award is to acknowledge and honour the exceptional achievements of Australian craftspeople, designers, media artists, visual artists and arts writers who have made and are continuing to make an outstanding contribution to the development of Australian art. Award recipients receive a specially commissioned pin and $40,000. The Australia Council Visual Arts Medal is to acknowledge and honour extraordinary professional achievements of living curators, administrators and/or advocates of contemporary Australian art, who have made and are continuing to make an outstanding contribution to the development of the Australian cultural sector. The recipient receives a specially commissioned medal and $10,000.   The 2013 recipients’ biography: Tracey Moffatt iTracey Moffatt is one of Australia's leading contemporary artists. Since 1989, she has held numerous solo exhibitions in major museums around the world. Her short film Night Cries was selected for official competition at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival, followed by her first feature film, beDevil, in 1993. In 1997, she exhibited in Aperto at the Venice Biennale and at the Dia Centre for the Arts, New York in 1997/98. Comprehensive survey exhibitions of her work have been held at the Museum of Contemporary Art (2003), Sydney and the Hasselblad Centre in Goteburg, Sweden (2004). In 2006, she had her first retrospective exhibition in Italy, at Spazio Oberdan, Milan. In 2007, Charta Publishers, Milan, published a monograph, The Moving Images of Tracey Moffatt. She is also a recipient of the 2007 Infinity Award for art by the International Center of Photography, New York. A solo exhibition of her films and videos was held in May 2012 at the Museum of Modern Art. Moffatt is represented in North America by Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York and has been represented by Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, since 1998.   Juliana Engberg Juliana Engberg is currently Artistic Director of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, where she has commissioned and curated, numerous exhibitions including: Pipilotti Rist: I Packed the Postcard in My Suitcase; Yael Bartana: TRILOGY; Nathan Coley Appearences; Mortality; Joseph Kosuth Texts for Nothing, Samuel Beckett in Play; Plenty Ought To Be Enough: Barbara Kruger; Richard Billingham: People Places Animals; Jenny Holzer: For the Centre, Retrospectology; among many others. In 1999 she was the Artistic Director of the internationally acclaimed Melbourne International Biennial 1999 Signs of Life, and before accepting this commission was Senior Curator at the Museum of Modern Art (Heide), Melbourne, Senior Curator of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, Assistant Director of the Monash University Gallery, and Director of the formative contemporary art space the Ewing and George Paton Galleries, The University of Melbourne. A curator, writer, publisher and designer, she has been described as ‘an impeccable eye wedded to a keen intellect’ by influential ArtForum magazine. She has worked with some of the leading international artists of the last and this century. She was recently appointed Artistic Director of the 19th Biennale of Sydney 2014 one of the most prestigious international contemporary art events presented in Australia. She is also Professorial Fellow in the Faculty of Monash Art Design and Architecture.   Contact For inquiries about this media release contact: Gabrielle WilsonPhone 0412 686 548, Email g.wilson@australiacouncil.gov.au Brendan WallPhone 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-04-23 The Australian Pavilion at the 55th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia will feature a new body of work by artist Simryn Gill   The Australian Pavilion in the Giardini della Biennale La Biennale di Venezia dates: 1 June – 24 November 2013 La Biennale di Venezia Vernissage dates: 29 May – 31 May 2013 The Australian Pavilion Official website: http://venicebiennale.australiacouncil.gov.au   Sydney, Australia: The official Australian representation at the 55th International Art Exhibition comprises an exhibition of new works by Simryn Gill and is curated by Catherine de Zegher. Simryn Gill works in the realm of the ephemeral and the domestic, with its daily habits and repetitions. Through her images and collections of objects, she brings into play her, and our, everyday experiences. Once formed, these works have the unexpected capacity to disturb our ideas of order. Be they books and words, landscapes of sublime power, or discarded objects of uncertain value, the different elements of her work exist in the present. In the words of the artist Simryn Gill, “These are ordinary things, yet they are indeterminate and open in their nature, and can be the hardest of things to describe clearly or grasp simply.”   “Simryn Gill’s terrain,” says Catherine de Zegher, “ is the intertidal zone, the insecure in-between zone—that shifting place on a beach where the ocean comes in, covering over shells and crabs, sandflies and sprouting mangroves, and bringing with it detritus of man-made goods down maritime trade routes, to then retreat again. Her work proposes a space of negotiation between the small and the global, between nature and industry, as it reveals an understanding of the interconnectedness of all in a world in flux.”   “We take great pride in the fact that for more than three decades the Australia Council has managed and lead-funded our national representation at the Venice Biennale,” says Rupert Myer AM, Chair of the Australia Council. “Venice is considered the most important and prestigious event on the international contemporary arts calendar. It is an unmatched opportunity for Australia to present its finest artists to the world and an opportunity for dialogue about creativity and ideas between artists, professionals and audiences. We are thrilled to be presenting Simryn Gill’s work at the 55th International Art Exhibition.”   “Simryn Gill continues a tradition of outstanding Australian representation at the Venice Biennale,” says Australian Commissioner Simon Mordant AM. “We are truly delighted that Simryn is our representative for the upcoming biennale. Visitors will be intrigued by the way Simryn has engaged with the Australian Pavilion. In Here art grows on trees Simryn blends the everyday elements of her practice for a powerful, almost radical result. Simryn and Catherine have created an exhibition we are excited about and very proud of.”   Simryn Gill lives and works in Sydney, Australia, and Port Dickson, Malaysia. She has exhibited widely, including the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; Tate Modern, London; and The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Washington DC. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions. In 2009, she showed in 9th Sharjah Biennial, in 2011 at the 12th Istanbul Biennial, and most recently in 2012 with a commission for Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany. Gill’s works are held in collections such as the Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia; Tate Modern, London; Singapore Art Museum; The Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.   A major new publication of Simryn Gill’s work, edited by Catherine de Zegher, will be launched at the vernissage, featuring essays by Carol Armstrong, Lilian Chee, Ross Gibson, Kajri Jain, Brian Massumi, Michael Taussig and Catherine de Zegher.   Simryn Gill is represented by Breenspace, Sydney; Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai; and Tracy Williams Ltd, New York.      About the curator  Catherine de Zegher is currently the Curator for the forthcoming 5th Moscow Biennale (2013). She was previously co-Artistic Director of the 18th Biennale of Sydney (all our relations) in 2012, the same year she won two international critics awards for her book and exhibition On Line. Drawing Through the Twentieth Century at MoMA, where she was a guest curator in the Department of Drawing. Prior to this, de Zegher held various positions in Europe and North America, notably as the Executive Director of the Drawing Center in New York City and the Belgian Commissioner for the 47th Venice Biennale. De Zegher has written and edited numerous books on drawing and feminism and is currently working on a collection of her published essays.   About the Commissioner Simon Mordant AM is Vice Chairman and Managing Director of Greenhill & Co. Inc., a leading global independent corporate advisory firm. He is a committed and passionate supporter of the arts. Mordant has served as Chairman of the Board of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia (MCA) since 2010, having also served previously as Chairman of the Museum’s Foundation. Mordant also sits on the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC), the Sydney Theatre Company, the Leadership Council for the New Museum in New York, and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Tate International Council and a member of the International Council of The Museum of Modern Art in New York.   About the Australia Council  As the Australian Government’s arts funding and advisory body, the Australia Council has managed and lead funded Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale since 1978. The Australia Council is committed to building opportunities for the international presentation and collection of Australian contemporary art, and representation at the Biennale is an important part of this strategy. Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale has contributed to the professional development of many artists and has opened up significant exhibition opportunities internationally. About the Australian Pavilion The Australian Pavilion is positioned within the Biennale Gardens (Giardini della Biennale). The pavilion is one of 29 pavilions within the Biennale Gardens, all built at different periods by various countries. The Australian Pavilion was designed by renowned Australian architect Philip Cox and opened in 1988. Australia’s representation at the Venice Biennale began in 1954 with an exhibition of Sidney Nolan, Russell Drysdale and William Dobell’s iconic works, followed by visual arts luminaries such as Arthur Boyd, Rosalie Gascoigne and Albert Tucker. Other previous Australian representatives include Bill Henson (1995), Judy Watson, Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1997), Howard Arkley (1999), Lyndal Jones (2001), Patricia Piccinini (2003), Ricky Swallow (2005), Susan Norrie, Daniel Von Sturmer and Callum Morton (2007), Shaun Gladwell (2009) and Hany Armanious (2011).    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdbedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (96 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Australia and New Zealand Brendan Wall | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Gabrielle Wilson | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 0433 972 915 , Email g.wilson@australiacouncil.gov.au International John Diviney | Brunswick ArtsPhone +971 (4) 446 6270, Email jdiviney@brunswickgroup.com 2013-04-29 Leading Australian artist unveils large scale rooftop installation for major museum in Paris The critically acclaimed musée du quai Branly in Paris will soon be home to a dynamic new installation by leading Aboriginal Australian artist Lena Nyadbi. At a special ceremony in Canberra today, Australia will celebrate a major new commission specifically designed for the Paris museum’s rooftop. At almost 700 square metres, the large scale art installation has been designed to be viewed from the Eiffel Tower and by Google Earth users, making it one of the largest artworks  made by an Australian artist and an important new addition to the world renowned museum dedicated to the arts and cultures of Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. One of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, Lena Nyadbi is a Gija woman of Nyawurru skin. Born around 1936 in the East Kimberley region of Western Australia, Nyadbi is best known for  her rich, spare aesthetic. After a decade under apprenticeship to leading Kimberley master artists, Nyadbi began painting in 1998. Her paint is hand-made using natural ochre and charcoal from Gija country. This literal inseparability from country is implicit in the power of her artwork. In a unique partnership between the Australia Council, the musée du quai Branly, and the Harold Mitchell Foundation, the artist was last year commissioned to create a new site-specific installation for the museum’s rooftop terrace. To be unveiled in Paris on 6 June 2013, the outdoor work is titled Dayiwul Lirlmim (Barramundi Scales). Filling the 700 square metres rooftop, the giant rendering is an adaptation of a new black and white painting by the artist. The original artwork will also go on display at the Paris Museum. Both works have been inspired by Nyadbi’s mother’s land in Dayiwul Country in Western Australia. Located on the left Bank in the heart of Paris, the musée du quai Branly is one of France’s national museums and is a world leading centre for global cultures and arts. The musée  collection comprises more than 300,000 works of art, of which 33 000 are from Oceania. Today the musée collection features 1423 Aboriginal works of art including weapons, boomerangs, tools and sculptures. The installation will be viewed by the seven million people who visit the Eiffel Tower every year and by Google Earth users. “This powerful new work by Lena Nyadbi is an historic opportunity to highlight and promote Indigenous Australian art and cultures to a global audience in Paris,” said Australia Council Chair  Mr Rupert Myer AM. “It is also an opportunity to continue to develop the relationship between the Australia Council, Australian galleries and museums and the musée du quai Branly. Importantly, this commission builds on the success of a project in 2006 with the musée which featured work by eight artists, including Lena Nyadbi on the ceilings and facade of the museum which attracted the attention of visitors from around the world.” Harold Mitchell AC, Chairman of the Harold Mitchell Foundation said, “Through the Harold Mitchell Foundation we seek to have a transformational impact with the projects we fund. Presented in the heart of European civilisation this project both raises the profile of Indigenous art and expands the ways we think about the possibilities of Aboriginal art in a global context” “We are very excited to present work of this magnitude by an important contemporary Australian  Aboriginal artist,” said Stéphane Martin, President of the musée du quai Branly who approached Australia Council in 2011 with the proposal for a large scale work at the museum. Since 2011, numerous discussions and visits with the artist at her home in Western Australia have resulted in the extraordinary artwork Dayiwul Lirlmim. “The scale and prominence of this project is a reflection of the growing interest in contemporary Aboriginal Australian art among museum visitors across Europe and internationally,” said Mr Martin. “Lena Nyadbi’s remarkable paintings at once embody a particular place and culture and speak many languages” said Ms Lee-Ann Buckskin Chair of the Australia Council Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board. “Translated from a canvas an architectural scaled sculptural form, Nyadbi’s commission highlights the dynamism of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts among the Indigenous cultures of the world”. The Paris installation will coincide with a major new exhibition of Kimberley artists from the Warmun Art Centre at the Australian Embassy in Paris, which will open on 6 June 2013. This project is being presented by the Australia Council for the Arts, musée du quai Branly, Harold Mitchell Foundation, the Australian Embassy in Paris and the National Gallery of Australia.   A reception is being held to launch the project in Australia on Monday 29 April, 12.30pm–2.30pm at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra. Special guests at the event include the Minister for the Arts The Hon Tony Burke MP, artist Lena Nyadbi, Australia Council Chair, Mr Rupert Myer, Ambassador of France to Australia H.E. Mr. Stéphane Romatet and President of the musée du quai Branly, Mr Stéphane Martin. All media are welcome to attend.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (197 KB).      Contact For inquiries about this media release contact:   Australia Gabrielle WilsonPhone 0433 972 915, Email g.wilson@australiacouncil.gov.au Brendan WallPhone 02 9215 9166, 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au   France Nora CharifiMusée du quai Branly Phone 33 (0)1 56 61 52 87, Email nora.charifi@quaibranly.fr Photo: Lena Nyadbi. Credit: Photo Jonathon Kimberley, Warmun Art Centre. 2013-05-07 Workshop brings together Indigenous writing sector Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers from across Australia will gather at the State Library of Queensland, Brisbane from 9 – 10 May 2013, for the inaugural Workshop being presented by the First Nations Australia Writers’ Network. With a focus on sustaining the sector and skills development, the Workshop will bring together 65 emerging and established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers from across Australia, as well as international guests from Canada and New Zealand, to participate in peer-to-peer workshops, formal presentations and round table discussions.   "Our writers have won some of the most prestigious literary awards in Australia,” says First Nations Australian Writers Network National coordinator, Cathy Craigie. “Two Aboriginal authors have won the Miles Franklin Award – Alexis Wright with Carpentaria in 2007 and Kim Scott with The Deadman Dance in 2011. Herb Wharton was awarded the 2012 Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature.”   “The depth of talent and experience that exists within our community is extraordinary and it is now time for us to work together to strengthen our future,” says Cathy.   The program includes some of the most highly regarded writers in Australian literature today. A keynote session will feature Alexis Wright in conversation with Dr. Sandra Phillips. In a panel presentation, Doing it our way, Melissa Lucashenko hosts authors Herb Wharton, Dr. Anita Heiss and Kim Scott. While international perspectives will be presented from story teller, Sharon Shorty (Canada) and writer, Anton Blank (New Zealand).   Sophie Cunningham, Chair of the Australia Council Literature Board and Jill Eddington, Director of Literature will chair industry roundtable sessions; one for publishers and another for the wider sector including representatives of the writers festival and centre networks and key organisations. Other participants include Philip McLaren, Bruce Pascoe, Alexis West, John Harding, Sam Wagan Watson and Lionel Fogarty.   Lee-Ann Buckskin, Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board of the Australia Council, which provided $300,000 in three year strategic partnership funding to the First Nations Australian Writers Network, congratulated the group on its acheivement. “We are pleased to partner with the First Nations Australian Writers Network on this significant milestone,” says Lee-Ann. “It is a strong testament to the exciting storytelling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers and its recognition worldwide.   “It builds upon the Australia Council support for research, international exchanges with Canada and New Zealand through the Honouring Words initiative, and the groundbreaking Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Aboriginal Literature.”   “Everyone involved in establishing this week’s workshop are to be congratulated, and we look forward to the outcomes that will inform future policy initiatives in this vibrant and culturally significant sector,” concluded Lee-Ann. For more information and to register please visit: http://fnawworkshop.com    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdbedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (38.1 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Brendan WallPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Cameron WoodsPhone 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 , Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-05-14 Australia Council fellowships offer artists creative freedom Australia Council Chair Mr Rupert Myer AM today announced the 11 recipients of the second annual Australia Council Creative Australia Fellowships. The announcement was made at a special event at the Melbourne Recital Centre attended by the artists as well as a broad cross section of the arts community. With original funding for only five fellowships across the two categories, the Australia Council committed to a further six after being impressed by the exceptional quality of applications, bringing the total funding pool to $860,000.   The highly sought after fellowships attracted a total of 255 applications (172 for early career and 83 for established.) The established artists will each receive $100,000 for one year and the early career artists will receive $60,000 over two years.   Mr Myer congratulated the recipients of the prestigious Creative Australia Fellowships which aim to support both emerging and established artists develop their arts practice, to experiment, research and develop new ways to present their works.   “These grants provide artists with the valuable time and financial security to focus on their work and in turn drive innovation and dynamic growth in our arts,” Mr Myer said.   “The Australia Council is deeply committed to supporting the development and the celebration of Australia’s creative talent, offering training opportunities and career pathways in the arts and its related industries.   “Through the Fellowships the Australia Council is providing direct support to artists at critical stages during their careers to ensure they have time to develop, to support risk taking, experimentation and innovation.” “These Creative Australia Fellowships were designed to recognise artists who have already made a significant contribution to Australian culture and to those that are taking an original approach to artistic practice, including those who are working across multiple disciplines,” said Mr Myer.   "The Fellowships are an investment in the long term sustainability of each artists’ career. So from the perspective of the Australia Council, this is an investment in the future of art."  Managed by the Australia Council the Creative Australia Fellowships are a major initiative to support the professional development of outstanding artists working across the sector and Australia. The Fellowships are a centrepiece of the Federal Government’s Creative Australia Artist Grants initiative with $10m committed to individual artists over five years. A list of recipients and bios are available here.    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdbedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (44 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Brendan WallPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Cameron WoodsPhone 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 , Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-05-27 Artists celebrated at 6th annual National Indigenous Arts Awards The Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board is proud to present the $50,000 Red Ochre Award, Australia’s highest peer-assessed award for an Indigenous artist; to actor, dancer, choreographer and painter David Gulpilil, OAM. Presented since 1993, the Red Ochre Award acknowledges the outstanding contribution of an artist to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts at the national and international levels. It is presented today at the 6th National Indigenous Arts Awards, held at the Sydney Opera House.   Also presented is the $20,000 Dreaming Award, for a young and emerging Indigenous artist, awarded to Rhonda Dick, a photographer from South Australia; and Two fellowships of $45,000 per year over two years to visual artist, Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello; and writer, activist and musician Richard Frankland.   “The Australia Council’s National Indigenous Arts Awards highlight the outstanding achievements o Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists” says Rupert Myer, AM, Chair of the Australia Council. “They celebrate the continuity and dynamism of contemporary Indigenous cultures in Australia.” "These awards and fellowships are a significant recognition of the unique and important work of each of the recipients,” says Lee-Ann Buckskin, Chair of the Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board. “The Red Ochre Award for David Gulpilil is wonderful acknowledgement from his peers of David’s continual efforts to bring the experiences and wishes of his people to national and international attention,” says Lee-Ann. “He is unquestionably one of the most respected Australian actors on the international film stage, and a major contributor to the voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders”. David Gulpilil was first cast in the 1971 film Walkabout because of his extraordinary talents as a dancer. He was just 15 and had never acted before. Since then he has appeared in films that have been milestones in Australian cinema, and which have helped define Australian culture. These include Storm Boy, Mad Dog Morgan, The Last Wave, Crocodile Dundee, Two Hands, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Tracker, Ten Canoes and Australia. He has also acted in a wealth of television roles. Mr Myer said Tony Grybowski’s appointment comes after an extensive search. Director Rolf de Heer says David’s performance in Walkabout, “was so strong, so imbued with a new type of graceful naturalism, that it redefined perceptions of Aboriginality in the field of acting for the screen.” His performance in The Tracker is his most critically acclaimed role to date, receiving numerous awards in 2002 including Best Actor at The Australian Film Institute Awards, the Inside Film Awards, and the Film Critics Circle Awards. David’s latest completed film, Satellite Boy, directed by Aboriginal director Catriona McKenzie, is set in Western Australia and will open in Australian cinemas on June 20. “Beyond his work on screen, David’s contribution to our people is astounding,” says Lee-Ann. “He has been, and continues to be, an inspiration to many people, opening doorways and creating career pathways where there were previously none.” With the support of his family and community David has a master plan to create economic development in Arnhem Land to generate jobs, social benefits and a new dimension for Australian tourism and the arts. David is already widely recognised as being a major influence on the growing number of Indigenous professionals across Australia. Twenty-six year old Rhonda Unurupa Dick is the recipient of the 2013 Dreaming Award, which is given to an artist aged between 18 and 26 to support them to create a major body of work, while being mentored in a chosen discipline by another established professional artist or by an arts institution nominated by the artist. Rhonda is Pitjantjatjara and a photographic artist from the community of Amata in South Australia. Soon after starting a job as an arts worker at the local Tjala Arts Centre in January 2012 she discovered her love of photography and devoted herself to its practice. “Rhonda’s work is about her family, her community and her country,” says Lee-Ann. “It attracted attention as soon as she started to show it, receiving the inaugural Desart Annual Aboriginal Arts Worker Prize 2012, for her series entitled My great grandmothers’ country.”  “It’s a joy to support this emerging artist who will undoubtedly create something wonderful from the opportunity, “says Lee-Ann. The Dreaming Award comes with a prize of $20,000 which Rhonda will use to study photography at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney under the mentorship of photographer Nici Cumpston. After spending a year developing new work and her practice Rhonda’s works will be displayed at a solo exhibition at the Outstation Gallery in Darwin and at Gallery Gabriella Pizzi in Melbourne. Fellowship recipient Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello is a Southern Arrernte woman. She is an awardwinning poet, writer, and visual artist as well as an academic, teacher and community leader. In 2008 the Adelaide-born artist, now resident in Canberra, worked with glass for the first time and was immediately hooked on the medium. Since then she has become known for her extraordinary evocations of traditional weaving in hot blown glass. Jennifer’s Fellowship will allow her to undertake an extensive program of glass blowing, kiln work and coldworking to create a significant body of 70-90 pieces based on traditional Aboriginal woven eel traps, fish traps, baskets, fish scoops and dillibags. Richard Frankland plans an ambitious musical based on Indigenous Australian history, to be developed with the assistance of his two-year Fellowship. Richard has written, directed and produced more than 50 film and video projects. As a musician he formed The Charcoal Club and once supported US star Prince. His work as a field officer with the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody inspired his award-winning play Conversations with the Dead. A Gunditjmara man raised in south-western Victoria, Richard Frankland has long been recognised for his passionate advocacy of social justice in writing, film and music. Now he plans to combine the three art forms to tell the story of ‘Indigenous Australians from invasion to today’ in a stage musical to be offered to theatre companies in 2014.    Red Ochre Award recipients 1993–2013 2013 David Gulpilil 2002 Dorothy Peters 2012 Warren H Williams 2001 Bunduk Marika 2011 Archie Roach 2000 Mervyn Bishop 2010 Michael Leslie 1999 Justine Saunders 2009 Gawirrin Gumana 1998 Bob Maza 2008 Doris Pilkington Garimara 1997 Jimmy Chi 2006 Tom E. Lewis 1996 Maureen Watson 2005 Seaman Dan 1995 Rita Mills 2004 John Bulunbulun 1994 Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri 2003 Jimmy Little 1993 Eva Johnson    Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdbedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (61.3 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Cameron WoodsPhone 02 9215 9030, 0412 686 548, Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au Brendan WallPhone 02 9215 9166, 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-05-27 The Australia Pavilion opens at the 55th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia The Australia Pavilion opens at the 55th International Art Exhibition -  la Biennale di Venezia La Biennale di Venezia dates: 1 June – 24 November 2013 La Biennale di Venezia Vernissage dates: 29 May – 31 May 2013 The Australian Pavilion Official website: http://venicebiennale.australiacouncil.gov.au  Venice, Italy: The Australia Council today officially unveils the Australian representation at the 55th International Art Exhibition- la Biennale di Venezia. Situated in the Giardini della Biennale, the Australian Pavilion features a site-specific project by Simryn Gill.  Curated by Catherine de Zegher, Here art grows on trees continues Gill’s work with the passage of time and the habitation of places. The artist works in the realm of the ephemeral and the domestic, with its daily habits and repetitions. Through her images and collections of objects, she brings into play her, and our, everyday experiences. Once formed, these works have the unexpected capacity to disturb our ideas of order. Be they books and words, landscapes of sublime power, or discarded objects of uncertain value, the different elements of her work exist in the present. In the words of the artist, “These are ordinary things, yet they are indeterminate and open in their nature, and can be the hardest of things to describe clearly or grasp simply.” “Simryn Gill’s terrain,” says curator Catherine de Zegher, “is the intertidal zone, the insecure in-between zone — that shifting place on a beach where the ocean comes in, covering over shells and crabs, sandflies and sprouting mangroves, and bringing with it detritus of man-made goods down maritime trade routes, to then retreat again. Her work proposes a space of negotiation between the small and the global, between nature and industry, as it reveals an understanding of the interconnectedness of all in a world in flux.” As always, Gill’s work is precise and poignant. She considers the building’s structure, composed of two rectangular volumes alongside each other, each having a different height and floor level. The upper floor holds the series of twelve large screens of collaged drawings, Let Go, Let Go, and the lower section contains the series of mine photographs, Eyes and Storms. The roof is partially removed exposing both of these works in equal measures to the elements. Throughout the exhibition’s six month duration, visitors will experience a process of disintegration: the transformation of Gill’s artwork by sunlight, rain and wind, and by the birds and insects feeding on the paper which itself features insects. “Here, amidst the trees, Gill’s site-specific project  presents paper works as being of vegetation, as a cog in the whole system of turning wheels, as just a link in the chain, in the string of gems that the world is offering—a cyclic instead of linear world-view. Originating from pulp made of decayed plants, the works will slowly return to the vegetal in an organic cycle from foliage to folio to foliage. In short, her project is about entropy, the passage through time: paper’s passage, the work’s passage, the Pavilion’s passage, the artist’s passage,” says de Zegher. Rupert Myer AM, Chair of the Australia Council, says: “In Here art grows on trees, Simryn Gill presents art that is disciplined and rigorous but also poetic, subtle and inclusive. Gill’s combination of works in various media use methodical collections and thoughtful interventions to transform the Australian Pavilion. I am delighted to offer our warmest congratulations to Simryn and extend our thanks for her commitment and endeavour in realising this ambitious project. Considered the most prestigious event on the contemporary art calendar, Venice is an unmatched opportunity to present our finest artists to the world. Simryn Gill continues a 60-year tradition of outstanding Australian representation at the Venice Biennale.” Simon Mordant AM, Australian Commissioner, says: “It has been an enormous privilege to be Commissioner for Australia’s representation at the 2013 Venice Biennale. For this project, Simryn Gill blends the everyday elements of her practice for a powerful, almost radical result. The artist asks us to see her work as finite and impermanent. By literally peeling back the roof, she is setting in motion an exhibition which will evolve throughout the course of the six-month exhibition. Visitors will watch as it changes, registers the elements and transforms over time. What will be left is unknown. However, I have no doubt that it will leave a lasting impression on visitors. We are truly delighted that Simryn Gill is our representative for the 55th International Art exhibition.” A major new publication of Simryn Gill’s work, edited by Catherine de Zegher, was launched today in Venice. The publication features essays by Carol Armstrong, Lilian Chee, Ross Gibson, Kajri Jain, Brian Massumi, Michael Taussig and Catherine de Zegher.Simryn Gill is represented by Breenspace, Sydney; Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai; and Tracy Williams Ltd, New York.   About the Artist Simryn Gill lives and works in Sydney, Australia, and Port Dickson, Malaysia. She has exhibited widely, including the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; Tate Modern, London; and The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Washington DC. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions. In 2009, she showed in 9th Sharjah Biennial, in 2011 at the 12th Istanbul Biennial, and most recently in 2012 with a commission for Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany. Gill’s works are held in collections such as the Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia; Tate Modern, London; Singapore Art Museum; The Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.   About the Curator Catherine de Zegher is currently the Curator of the forthcoming 5th Moscow Biennale (2013). She was previously co-Artistic Director of the 18th Biennale of Sydney (all our relations) in 2012, the same year she won two international critics awards for her book and exhibition On Line. Drawing Through the Twentieth Century at MoMA, where she was a guest curator in the Department of Drawing. Prior to this, de Zegher held various positions in Europe and North America, notably as the Executive Director of the Drawing Center in New York City and the Belgian Commissioner for the 47th Venice Biennale. De Zegher has written and edited numerous books on drawing and feminism and is currently working on a collection of her published essays.   About the Commissioner Simon Mordant AM is Vice Chairman and Managing Director of Greenhill & Co. Inc., a leading global independent corporate advisory firm. He is a committed and passionate supporter of the arts. Mordant has served as Chairman of the Board of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) since 2010, having also served previously as Chairman of the Museum’s Foundation. Mordant also sits on the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC), the Sydney Theatre Company, the Leadership Council for the New Museum in New York, and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Tate International Council and a member of the International Council of The Museum of Modern Art in New York.   About the Publication Here art grows on trees presents Simryn’s Gill’s oeuvre, including her latest works commissioned for the Australian Pavilion at the 55th International Exhibition of Art ¬– la Biennale di Venezia. Edited by the exhibition curator, Catherine de Zegher, this limited edition monograph also includes beautiful artwork plates selected by the artist to illustrate her extensive practice. Commissioned essays by leading international thinkers include: Catherine de Zegher (Online. Drawing Through the Twentieth Century, MoMA), Carol Armstrong (Scenes in a Library, MIT Press), Lilian Chee (Conserving Domesticity, ORO Editions), Ross Gibson (26 Views of a Starburst World, UWA Press), Kajri Jain (Gods in the Bazaar, DUP Books), Brian Massumi (Semblance and Event, MIT Press), and Michael Taussig (What Color is The Sacred? UCP).   About the Australia Council As the Australian Government’s arts funding and advisory body, the Australia Council has managed and lead funded Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale since 1978. The Australia Council is committed to building opportunities for the international presentation and collection of Australian contemporary art, and representation at the Biennale is an important part of this strategy. Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale has contributed to the professional development of many artists and has opened up significant exhibition opportunities internationally. About the Australian Pavilion The Australian Pavilion is positioned within the Biennale Gardens (Giardini della Biennale). The pavilion is one of 29 pavilions within the Biennale Gardens, all built at different periods by various countries. The Australian Pavilion was designed by renowned Australian architect Philip Cox and opened in 1988. Australia’s representation at the Venice Biennale began in 1954 with an exhibition of Sidney Nolan, Russell Drysdale and William Dobell’s iconic works, followed by visual arts luminaries such as Arthur Boyd, Rosalie Gascoigne and Albert Tucker. Other previous Australian representatives include Bill Henson (1995), Judy Watson, Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1997), Howard Arkley (1999), Lyndal Jones (2001), Patricia Piccinini (2003), Ricky Swallow (2005), Susan Norrie, Daniel Von Sturmer and Callum Morton (2007), Shaun Gladwell (2009) and Hany Armanious (2011).   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (197 KB).    Contact For inquiries about the appointment contact: Australia and New Zealand Brendan Wall | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Gabrielle Wilson | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 0433 972 915 , Email g.wilson@australiacouncil.gov.au International John Diviney | Brunswick ArtsPhone +971 (4) 446 6270, Email jdiviney@brunswickgroup.com 2013-06-12 Australian arts contributors acknowledged in 2013 Queen’s Birthday Honours List Chair of the Australia Council for the Arts, Rupert Myer AM, today congratulated those Australian artists, educators and administrators whose contribution to the cultural life of our nation has been recognised in this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours List. “On behalf of the Australia Council I would like to extend our congratulations to all of the arts and cultural recipients of Honours in this years Queen’s Birthday Honours List,” said Australia Council Chair Mr. Rupert Myer. “This recognition is integral to who we are as Australians. These Honours help define, encourage and reinforce our national cultural aspirations. They acknowledge, celebrate and thank those who make a difference, those who achieve their best and those who have made an enduring contribution to Australia’s creative life. “I am delighted to see that artists and arts leaders across the whole spectrum of the arts have been recognised across all of the Honours categories,” said Mr. Myer. “Some are well known to Australian and even international arts communities, while others have dedicated their time and passion for little recognition. “Significantly, many of those recognised have selflessly fostered and supported young and emerging creative talent, ensuring that generations of Australians benefit from their experience. In particular, it very gratifying to note the many Australians who have been acknowledged in the OAM category for the contribution they have made to local and community arts organisations across the nation,” Mr Myer said. Each year the Australia Council makes approximately 1800 grants valued at more than $170m to artists and more than 160 organisations in every state and territory in the fields of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts, music, community partnerships, literature, theatre, visual arts, and dance. All of the Council’s funding decisions are made at arm’s length from government by peer review. QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST ARTS AND CULTURAL RECIPIENTS Recipients from the fields of arts and culture in the AC, AO, AM and OAM Queen’s Birthday Honours categories follow: COMPANION (AC) IN THE GENERAL DIVISION Professor Jill KER CONWAY For eminent service to the community, particularly women, as an author, academic and through leadership roles with corporations, foundations, universities and philanthropic groups. OFFICER (AO) IN THE GENERAL DIVISION Dr Kenneth Willis CATO For distinguished service to the graphic design profession as a practitioner, and through education and development roles both nationally and internationally. Mr Robert Henry DICKERSON For distinguished service to the visual arts as a figurative painter, and to the community through support for a range of cultural, medical research and social welfare organisations. Ms Fiona Margaret HALL For distinguished service to the visual arts as a painter, sculptor and photographer, and to art education. Professor Shirley Elizabeth McKECHNIE OAM For distinguished service to the performing arts, particularly dance, to the education and development of dancers and choreographers, and to research. MEMBER (AM) IN THE GENERAL DIVISION Mr Les BLAKEBROUGH For significant service to the visual arts as a ceramicist and educator and through professional artistic associations. Mr Kim David CARPENTER For significant service to the performing arts. Mr William Delafield COOK For significant service to the visual arts as a realist painter of Australian landscapes. Mrs Robin Ann DALTON For significant service to the film industry as a producer, literary agent and author, and as a mentor to emerging actors and writers. Mr Ivor Arthur DAVIES For significant service to the music and entertainment industry as a songwriter and performer, and to the community. Ms Nance Gwyneth GRANT MBE For significant service to the performing arts, particularly opera. Ms Nanette Louise HASSALL For significant service to the performing arts, particularly through dance education. Professor John Raymond HOPKINS OBE For significant service to the performing arts, particularly as a conductor, to music education, and to the community. Mr Timothy KAIN For significant service to music as a classical guitarist, educator and mentor. Mr Colin Herbert KOCH For significant service to arts administration, particularly the development of Indigenous art and culture. Ms Katie LAHEY For significant service to business and commerce, and to the arts. Ms Frances Irma LINDSAY For significant service to the arts, particularly as a curator and administrator in galleries and museums. Ms Elizabeth Maria MORGAN For significant service to music education, particularly of the violin. Mr Aarne Olavi NEEME For significant service to the performing arts as a director and educator in theatre and television. Mr Stephen Richard PHILLIPS For significant service to arts administration in the field of opera. Ms Merlyn QUAIFE For significant service to music. Mr Kenneth Reginald REED For significant service to the performing and visual arts as a supporter and philanthropist. Mr Rowan Alexander ROSS For significant service to arts governance, and to business. Ms Katrina Le Breton RUMLEY For significant service to the visual arts, particularly in the museums and galleries sector Mr Robert Philip SESSIONS For significant service to the Australian publishing industry. Ms Judith Margaret SMALL For significant service to folk music, as a songwriter and recording artist. Mrs Anna Trehearne SWEENY For significant service to opera as a teacher of movement and stagecraft. MEDAL (OAM) IN THE GENERAL DIVISION Mr Bruce Edwin ARMSTRONG For service to music, particularly brass bands, and to the community of Warragul Ms Renie Ann ALLISON-MARTINI For service to the performing arts, particularly through dance education. Ms June Marie BENNETT For service to music, and to the community of Broken Hill. Mr Roy Alfred BERRYMAN For service to the arts through a range of photographic organisations, and to the community of the Gippsland region. Ms Beverly May BILLS For service to the visual and textile arts. Ms Naida Elizabeth BLACKLEY For service to education as a music teacher. Mr Lloyd David BLAZELY For service to the community, particularly through the Salamanca Arts Ms Carol Elissa BOOTHMAN For service to the arts as an educator. Mr Russell Stuart BROWN For service to the arts, particularly theatre in the Canberra region. Mr Alan Vincent BROWNE For service to music as a jazz musician, and to the community. Ms Jennifer Joy CHAPMAN For service to music as an educator and musical director. Mr Robert McBeath CROSER For service to the arts through contributions to amateur theatre as a director and mentor. Ms Hazel Eileen EDWARDS For service to literature. Mr Alexis Helen FITZGERALD For service to the community of Esk, particularly through choir and music. Ms Evelyn Christine FRANCE For service to art. Ms Roseanna GALLO For service to the community, particularly through singing and entertainment. Mr Kenneth William HEMMENS For service to the performing arts, and to education. Ms Heather Marian JOYNES For service to arts and crafts, particularly embroidery. Mr  Robert Charles KIRCHNER For service to the arts, and to the community. Mr Rupert McCALL For service to the community, particularly as a poet. Ms Heather Colleen McKEAN For service to the performing arts as a country music entertainer and promoter. Mr Daryl John POWELL For service to the community through the teaching, promotion and preservation of Australian folk music and dance. Ms Margaret Spehr REICHELT For service to the community, particularly as a teacher of highland dancing. Ms Deidre May RICKARDS For service to music education. Mr David George ROACH For service to the arts through contributions to amateur theatre, and to the community. Ms Kim Marie SUTHERLAND For service to the arts. Ms Marie-Claire SZEKELY For service to the performing arts, particularly opera. Mr Viktor ZAPPNER For service to the arts through the introduction and promotion of jazz in north west Tasmania.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (197 KB).     Contact Brendan Wall | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Cameron Woods | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548, Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-06-12 ISEA2013 showcases Australia’s electronic arts practice Chair of the Australia Council for the Arts, Rupert Myer AM, today addressed some 450 delegates of the International 19th Symposium of Electronic Art (ISEA2013) at the gala reception held in Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum, in a celebration of innovation and creativity in the arts and in our society. Presented by the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and held alongside Vivid Sydney, ISEA2013 showcases the best media artworks from around the world, while bringing together engaging presentations and thought-provoking speakers, providing a platform for the lively exchange of future-focused ideas. Speaking at the gala event, Mr Myer described the Australia Council’s $325,000 investment in the ISEA2013 public program as “a long term investment in the future of creativity in this country.” “ISEA2013 presents a dazzling array of contemporary electronic arts practice by creative pioneers working at the intersections of art, science and technology in increasingly imaginative ways. It also affords a wonderful opportunity for dialogue and collaboration between practitioners the world over,” Mr Myer said. “Digital and new media has become an integral part of artistic creation, presentation and distribution in the 21st century, and the Australia Council is delighted to be supporting artists working in the media arts space across all artforms. “We are particularly pleased that ISEA’s 2013 public program showcases the breadth of Australia’s media and interdisciplinary practice for both local audiences and for ISEA’s visiting global audience of peers. “This event reinforces our view that national funding organisations such as the Australia Council ought to be shaped by the creative experimentation and directions pursued by artists rather than the categories defined by bureaucracies or notions of traditional media,” Mr Myer said. Mr Myer said the Australia Council recently reaffirmed its commitment to fostering and supporting artistic innovation in electronic arts and media arts practice with the dedication of a standalone Emerging and Experimental Arts section of Council. “That is what the new structures and processes soon to be implemented at the Australia Council represent – a platform that reinforces the centrality of the artist and seeks to raise the profile of the artist in everything we do,” he said. 2013 marks 21 years since the event was hosted in Australia, with the 3rd International Symposium on Electronic Art (TISEA) hosted in Sydney in 1992, providing the opportunity to reflect on 21 years of rapid development and change in digital practice in the arts. The 19th International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA2013) is held   Friday 7 to Sunday 16 June 2013 at venues across greater Sydney. http://www.isea2013.org   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (197 KB).     Contact Brendan Wall | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9166 | 0427 689 910, Email b.wall@australiacouncil.gov.au Cameron Woods | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548, Email c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-06-25 Australia Council Bill approved by the Senate The Australia Council Bill 2013 – the new governing legislation for the Australia Council - was today approved by the Senate after passing through the House of Representatives last month.Once proclaimed, the new Act will replace the Australia Council Act 1975, as recommended in the report of the Review of the Australia Council which was publicly released in May 2012. It also adopts the majority of the recommendations of that Review. Mr Rupert Myer, Chair of the Australia Council, said the passage of the legislation allows the Australia Council to finalise arrangements for its implementation. “The new Act updates the Australia Council’s functions and governance structure in a manner that reinforces the centrality of the artist in the programs and support we provide.   “It achieves this by modernising our legislative framework to ensure the new Board has the flexibility to establish panels of artistic peers to provide advice or to make recommendations on specified matters, including the awarding of grants based on peer assessment.” “This will allow the Australia Council to continue to be responsive to the creative directions and practices now being pursued by artists and arts organisations, rather than having artists’ work defined only by traditional funding categories.” Australia Council CEO, Tony Grybowski said the organisation would now implement a comprehensive series of transitional arrangements to ensure continuity for its stakeholders. “Artists and organisations can be reassured that work of the Council will continue in its current form until the legislation is proclaimed, including all currently scheduled meetings of the art form boards, the ATSIA Board, the MPA Board and relevant committees. “We will continue to update the sector on all relevant matters to ensure a smooth transition to our new Act.” Mr Myer thanked all Australia Council board and committee members for their contribution to date and for their continued commitment to the work of the Council in support of the artists and arts organisations of Australia. Media contacts Cameron Woods 02 9215 9030 | 0412 686 548 c.woods@australiacouncil.gov.au       Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (37.2 KB).     2013-06-28 New application process for indigenous arts funding The Australia Council for the Arts today announced a new application model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts funding after extensive consultation with stakeholders in the sector. Australia Council Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board Chair Lee-Ann Buckskin said the new process would make it easier for applicants to apply for funding. “The Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board undertakes regular reviews of the funding application policy,” Ms Buckskin said. “An extensive review of this process was undertaken earlier this year to examine current and alternative eligibility criteria, and evaluate its appropriateness, respectfulness, efficiency and effectiveness. “The Australia Council issued an options paper based on these terms of reference to more than 1,700 people and organisations in the Indigenous arts sector and relevant stakeholders. “Submissions were received from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from all states and territories. “A workshop was also held with about 40 representatives from Indigenous arts organisations to discuss various application options. “Themes emerging from the consultation include the need to protect resources dedicated for Indigenous people and this should be done in a sensitive way, and government agencies have no role in deciding who is and who isn’t Indigenous. “After careful consideration and extensive consultation the Australia Council has chosen a model that ensures dedicated funding supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and prevents fraudulent applications.” Ms Buckskin said the new model would no longer require artists to confirm their Indigenous identity at the application stage, and if successful they would need to agree to provide confirmation of their Indigenous identity if requested. “Written confirmation of an artists’ Indigenous identity would be accepted from an Aboriginal Lands Council or Indigenous-run organisation, including Link Up,” Ms Buckskin said. “This policy is not intended to cause offence, but is an important measure to protect Indigenous arts funding. “Applicants who have previously provided confirmation of their Indigenous identity to the Australia Council won’t need to do this again.” Ms Buckskin said the changes would apply from today.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (155 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-06-28 New Australia Council Board Appointed The Hon Tony Burke MP, Minister for the Arts today announced the inaugural members of the new Board of the Australia Council for the Arts. The appointments were made pursuant to the Council’s new legislation – the Australia Council Act 2013 - which received assent today from the Governor General. The appointments are effective from Monday 1 July. The 12 members of the inaugural Board under the new Act are: Mr Rupert Myer AM – Chair, Australia Council for the Arts; previously Chair, National Gallery of Australia, the Opera Australia Capital Fund, Commonwealth Inquiry into the Contemporary Visual Arts and Craft Sector and Kaldor Public Arts Projects; previously Trustee, National Gallery of Victoria; previously Board Member, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Currently Deputy Chair, Myer Holdings Ltd. Ms Robyn Archer AO - Deputy Chair, Australia Council for the Arts; Creative Director, Centenary of Canberra; celebrated singer, writer, director, artistic director. Mr Tony Grybowski – CEO, Australia Council for the Arts; previously General Manager, Australian Youth Orchestra; previously Executive, Musica Viva; Sydney Symphony Orchestra; teacher and musician. Mr Waleed Aly - Award-winning author; Broadcaster, currently host of Big Ideas on ABC TV; Academic and lecturer in politics at Monash University; Rock musician in the band Robot Child. Ms Lee-Ann Buckskin – Chair, ATSIA Board, Australia Council of the Arts; Manager, Indigenous Arts and Culture program, Carclew Youth Arts Adelaide; Member, SA Museums Aboriginal Advisory Committee; previously Program Coordinator for the Indigenous Program, Adelaide and Brisbane Festivals of Art. Mr Adrian Collette AM – Former CEO, Opera Australia for 16 years; currently Executive Director, Engagement and Partnerships, University of Melbourne; former Member, Victorian Council for the Arts; Life Member, Australian Entertainment Industry Association’s Executive Council; previously MD, Reed Books. Mr Khoa Do – Film director, producer and screenwriter - nominated for AFI Awards and shortlisted for an Academy Award; International keynote speaker; Community and youth worker and leader; Young Australian of the Year 2005. Professor Matthew Hindson AM – Chair, Music Board of the Australia Council for the Arts; Senior lecturer in & Media Technology and Arts Music, Sydney Conservatorium of Music; celebrated composer, author, artistic director and academic. Ms Mary-Ellen King – Board member, Perth International Arts Festival; previously General Manager, Melbourne International Arts Festival; Executive, Victorian Arts Centre; Melbourne Symphony Orchestra; Melbourne manager, Opera Australia; Perth Concert Hall. Currently COO Community, Bethanie Group. Ms Sophie Mitchell - Director, Expressions Dance Company (formerly Chairman); Trustee, Queensland Performing Arts Trust; Director, Corporate & Special Projects, RBS Morgans; Director, Silver Chef Limited; Member, Australian Government Takeovers Panel. Ms Samantha Mostyn – Chair, Community Partnerships Committee, Australia Council for the Arts; President, Australian Museum Trust; Board member, Sydney Theatre Company; Non-executive director Virgin Blue, Transurban and Citibank Australia; AFL Commissioner; Member, NSW Climate Change Council. Mr Tim Orton – Chair, Geelong Performing Arts Centre; Chair, Rhodes Trust Australia; Executive board member, Committee for Melbourne; Managing Director, Nous Group; previously Managing Director of Deakin Australia; Consultant, McKinsey and Company - London and New York. The Australia Council for the Arts is the Australian Government’s arts funding and advisory body Chair of the Australia Council, Mr Rupert Myer AM welcomed the appointment of the new Board members and expressed his gratitude to the members of the former Governing Council. “I thank all of the Governing Council members for their significant contribution to the development of the Australia Council and in particular for their advice and input towards the shaping of the Creative Australia policy and the Review of the Australia Council. “They each provided a cogent example to others of the power of the individual to make a real difference for arts in this country through advocacy, enthusiasm and wisdom.” In welcoming the members of the new Board, Mr Myer thanked Minister Burke for announcing the appointments. He said he was delighted with the accumulated breadth and depth of experience the organisation was gaining, particularly across a broad range of artform areas. “We are very fortunate to have a new Board comprised of talented, accomplished and energetic people, characterised by diverse backgrounds and representative of the wide ranging arts and corporate skills envisaged in our new legislation. “The membership is united by a common knowledge and passion for the arts, and strengthened by deep individual experience in areas such as artistic practice, arts management, business and finance, philanthropy, legal affairs, corporate strategy and research. “I know the new Board is eager to start working in support of Australia’s artists and arts organisations. I look forward to its initial meeting which will be instrumental in the Australia Council’s ongoing efforts to become more flexible and responsive to the needs of artists now and into the future,” Mr Myer said. From 1 July to 31 December 2013, current Boards and Committees will progressively be replaced by interim Peer Assessment Panels and Sector Strategy Panels to assess grant applications, and strategic advice to the new Board. In the interests of continuity for artists and organisations applying for support, current Board and Committee members will be invited by the new Board to sit on the Peer Assessment Panels, whilst all current Board Chairs will be invited to be the inaugural Chairs of the relevant Sector Strategy Panels. Mr Myer said that by November 2013, the new Board would aim to have its permanent processes in place for 2014 and beyond. “I also acknowledge and thank the employees and management of the Australia Council at this particularly busy and significant time. They are integral to the ongoing work of Strategic Plan development and to ensuring the Australia Council’s main stakeholders – Australia’s artists and arts organisations – experience a seamless transition to the new structures and processes being introduced.”   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-07-05 New Australia Council Panels Allocate Extra Funding Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski today said new Peer Assessment Panels, established at the first meeting of the Australia Council’s new Board this week, have already commenced the work of allocating additional funding to Australian artists and organisations. Mr Grybowski said the Australia Council’s newly created Visual Arts and Literature Peer Assessment Panels each held a series of meetings this week and made determinations on a combined total of approximately 900 applications for funding support. “The decision to establish the Peer Assessment Panels was approved by the new Board of the Australia Council as a priority action on its first day of operation on Monday,” Mr Grybowski said. “I am delighted to report that in addition to core funding, decisions made by the Visual Arts and Literature Peer Assessment Panels in the first week of the new financial year will see around $400,000 of the additional $15 million to support unfunded excellence in 2013/14 begin to flow to the successful artists and organisations without delay. “The most pleasing feedback from peers in recent days was that a number of exceptional applications in highly competitive grant categories were able to be funded as a result of this extra money, delivered by the Australian Government as part of Creative Australia.” Mr Grybowski said that in order to assist a seamless transition for artists and arts organisations seeking support during this period of change, the initial membership of the Peer Assessment Panels included the Chairs and members of the previous artform boards. “We are very fortunate at present to have artists of rich and diverse backgrounds and experience represented in each of our Peer Assessment Panels,” Mr Grybowski said. “For example, the Visual Arts Peer Assessment Panel this week engaged 10 peers from across the country, including artists, curators, craft designers and an arts writer. “Over coming months, the Board will be developing plans to further enhance the breadth and depth of expertise available to each Panel for the purpose of peer assessment. “It is critical and fundamental to our work that we get the right peers from across the country assessing the applications we receive.” Mr Grybowski said work on a comprehensive review of the Australia Council’s Grants Program is progressing well, with a view to implement a new Grants Program in 2015. Discussions with stakeholders will take place over the coming months. The new Program would provide direction for Peer Assessment Panels to allocate all funding, including the out-years of the additional $60 million, four-year unfunded excellence program. To ensure there was no delay in the additional funding under that program reaching the sector, the previous Council approved an initial tranche of around one-third of the additional $15 million in funding for 2013/14 to be initially apportioned across all artform areas. The allocation of the remainder of first year funding will be a priority area of consideration for the new Board. Mr Grybowski said the Australia Council’s Music Peer Assessment Panel would meet in Sydney next week.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-07-08 NAIDOC Week 2013 The Australia Council officially observes NAIDOC Week 2013. “Support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts practice is a core function of the new Australia Council legislation,” said Australia Council CEO Tony Grybowski. “It’s fitting that we commence this era of a renewed Australia Council with the official observance of NAIDOC Week.”   We acknowledge and celebrate the richness, diversity and endurance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture. NAIDOC 2013 celebrates and values the 50th anniversary of the presentation of the Yirrkala Bark Petitions to the Federal Parliament and the foresight, strength and determination of the Yolngu people whose Bark Petitions set into motion a long process of legislative and constitutional reforms for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.  Image: Richard Frankland. Credit: Caroline McCredy 2013-07-18 Key Trends for Major Performing Arts in Australia The headline figures of a new study into Australia’s Major Performing Arts sector in 2012 reveal encouraging growth in audience numbers, employment, new work presented and box office revenue across the 28 leading Australian companies. The snapshot of key trends report has been compiled by the Australia Council to inform the ongoing work of its Major Performing Arts Panel. It found 3.6 million Australians attended a performance, workshop or school activity by a Major Performing Arts company last year, an increase of 118,000 compared to 2011. Australia Council CEO, Tony Grybowski said the analysis was significant as it confirmed the Major Performing Arts sector continues to play a central and vital role in Australian cultural life. “In 2012 artistic achievement in our Major Performing Arts sector was strong, with Australians attending almost 6,000 performances, including world premiere performances of 108 new Australian works and almost eight million people listened or watched a radio broadcast, TV or cinema screening of performances by MPA companies” Mr Grybowski said. “There is also very encouraging news around the viability and sustainability of the sector. The findings show the 28 Major Performing Arts companies posted a combined operating surplus of $12.7 million, including a healthy increase in box office income. “That is a fantastic sign for the future of a sector that employs 8,400 people, including 4,600 artists.” Other highlights of the snapshot report into Major Performing Arts companies in 2012 include: Combined box office income increased by $28 million to $203 million, with all artforms except theatre reporting increases. $65 million was contributed in private sector (sponsorship and philanthropy) income, which is steady when compared to 2011, and a 25 per cent increase on 2010 figures. 308,000 people signed up to be friends of followers of the 28 Major Performing Arts companies via their social media channels. Mr Grybowski said the social media figures were an exciting sign of the evolving nature of audience engagement with the arts. “There was a 51 per cent increase in social media engagement compared to 2010, which is validation that people interested in the arts want to have a more direct relationship with their favourite arts companies,” Mr Grybowski said. The 28 Major Performing Arts companies include dance, theatre, opera, orchestra and chamber music from across Australia. These companies are jointly funded by the Australian Government, through the Australia Council for the Arts, and by the relevant state government. In 2012 the Australian Government provided $96 million to the Major Performing Arts companies and the State Government allocated $44 million. Download the report.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-07-24 Symbiosis: Living Through Art Exhibition Opens At Australia Council Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski today opened a new art exhibition showcasing works and projects developed by artists collaborating with communities across urban, regional and remote Australia. Mr Grybowski said the exhibition, Symbiosis: Living Through Art, was an innovative project funded by the Australia Council through its Community Partnerships program and was now on show in the foyer of the council’s Sydney office. “Symbiosis: Living Through Art celebrates the process of artists and communities coming together to make ground-breaking art that draws on life experiences, reflecting diverse knowledge, histories, identities and localities,” Mr Grybowski said. “Curated by Rusaila Bazlamit, the exhibition features recent screen-based work, new writing, music, theatre and visual arts projects that have been co-created by artists working in collaboration with diverse communities around Australia. “Some of the works were created by emerging African communities, Muslim women from around Australia, Aboriginal communities, Victorian farmers and the homeless. “We were delighted that many of the artists shared their stories and experiences of how these projects were initiated and developed at the launch event.” Mr Grybowski said the Australia Council’s Community Partnerships support community arts and cultural development practice through a range of programs and initiatives. “The program encompasses collaborations between professional artists and communities with the aim of achieving high quality results and long-term benefits,” Mr Grybowski said. “Community Partnerships focuses on a number of areas, including remote and regional Australia, Aboriginal communities, disability, young people, cultural diversity, emerging communities and important social and cultural issues. “It also delivers the Australia Council’s arts and education initiatives, such as the Artist in Residence program through collaborations with the states and territories.” Symbiosis: Living Through Art will run until 4 September at the Australia Council for the Arts’ Rover Thomas Auditorium at 372 Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills. It will be open to the public from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday and entry is free.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-07-25 Vale Betty Burstall The Australia Council mourns the death of Betty Burstall Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski has paid tribute to theatre pioneer Betty Burstall. “Betty Burstall was one of the first 24 General Members invited to be on the Australia Council, who met for the first time in February 1973,” Mr Grybowski said.   “She established the La Mama Theatre in 1967, which led to the prolific careers of some of Australia’s most noted playwrights, including David Williamson, Jack Hibberd and John Romeril.   “Betty’s influence on contemporary theatre continued through the ‘60s and ‘70s where she nurtured Melbourne’s arts community. During this time her reputation for being formidable, resilient and stoic, yet passionate, loyal and generous in creating opportunities for artists, sealed her role in Australia’s theatre history.   “The Australia Council community extends deepest sympathy to Betty’s family and friends.” Image: Courtesy of La Mama Theatre 2013-07-26 New Online Tools To Help Artists Market Their Work Australian artists seeking to promote their art nationally and internationally can now access helpful market development tools on the Australia Council’s website. Australia Council Director Market Development Collette Brennan said the new tools were created after a series of market development workshops hosted by the Australia Council across the country earlier this year. “The workshops were held to help artists and arts organisations plan their national and international market development activities,” Ms Brennan said. “Participants discussed the resources required to reach national and international markets, the opportunities available to artists and arts organisations both here and overseas and how to create a plan that is strategic and sustainable. “The workshops were attended by more than 40 representatives from performing arts companies, including producers, artistic directors and general managers, and were led by Paul McGill from Maakan. “Industry peers provided input into the workshops’ development and delivery, including Simon Abrahams, Rachael Azzopardi, Sandy Collins, Yaron Lifshitz, Rachel Maza, Teena Munn and Alice Nash. “Their valuable experience and the information gathered during these workshops has been used to create these innovative online tools.” Ms Brennan said the online tools had been designed in chapter form to individually address the major questions raised at the workshops, but they could be read as a complete package. “There are also slides, vox pops and templates for those who want to get hands-on and interactive with their planning,” Ms Brennan said. “The material has a performing arts focus, but many of the tips are transferrable to other art forms, such as music, visual arts and literature.” The online tools are available at http://marketdevelopmentskills.australiacouncil.gov.au The Australia Council’s Market Development section supports artists and arts organisations to distribute their work and connect to audiences here and abroad. Market development programs aim to support Australian artists and arts organisations with their business planning, take the work of artists to markets, with a particular focus on opportunities in Asia, and seed collaborations and relationships to drive national and international activity.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-07-31 Australia Council Congratulates Helpmann winners The Australia Council has acknowledged those nominated and the winners of this year’s Helpmann Awards, which recognise Australia’s distinguished artistic achievement and excellence in the live performance sector. Now in its 13th year, the Helpmann Awards recognise Australia’s distinguished artistic achievement and excellence in the live performance sector. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer and Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski attended last night’s awards ceremony. “This year has been particularly strong, with some great productions and performances, and on behalf of the Australia Council, we congratulate this year’s worthy winners.” Mr Myer acknowledged Australia Council Deputy Chair Robyn Archer and her band, who were recognised in the cabaret category for her performance of Que Reste-T-Il at the Famous Spiegel Garden and Toulouse-Lautrec Cabaret and Curator Dinner at the National Gallery of Australia. “The Australia Council congratulates Robyn and her pianist Michael Morley and accordianist George Butrumlis on their award,” Mr Myer said. “Robyn is a shining example of the immense talent we have in this country. She has performed and directed at numerous venues right across this country and we are fortunate to have the vast experience she brings to our new governing board.” Speaking from Japan, Ms Archer said was thrilled to be recognised by her peers. “Having been raised in my singer/stand up father’s atmosphere of fading Australian vaudeville, and later accidentally encountering Brecht, Weill and Eisler through Justin Macdonnell, the late Wal Cherry and the late John Willett, all in Adelaide, I will always be in debt to this suite of gentlemen for pointing me towards the discovery of strong, challenging and inspiring material to last a lifetime,” Ms Archer said. “I thank my very dear musician colleagues, especially Michael Morley and George Butrumlis, my producers and peers, and my audiences for continuing to give me the opportunity to perform songs that signify the essence of classic cabaret – tough lyrics and often complex composition, alongside big gut-busting belly laughs. “I thank all involved in the Helpmann Awards for this honour and congratulate them for acknowledging that cabaret is no lesser art, but is, as the great cabarettist Peter Altenberg claimed, ‘the art of small forms’.” To support the performing arts, the Australia Council provides annual funding to the 28 Major Performing Arts organisations, which includes dance, theatre, opera, orchestra and chamber music, and 140 key organisations across Australia. In 2012 the Australia Council provided $96 million to the Major Performing Arts companies and around $25 million to the key organisations. A recent Australia Council report on the Major Performing Arts companies found: 3.6 million Australians attended a performance, workshop or school activity by a Major Performing Arts company last year, an increase of 118,000 compared to 2011. Combined box office income increased by $28 million to $203 million, with all artforms except theatre reporting increases. The Major Performing Arts sector employs 8,400 people, including 4,600 artists. There were 108 new Australian works.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (197 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-08-02 Australia Council Congratulates Australian Arts in Asia inaugural award winners The Australia Council has acknowledged those nominated and the winners of this year’s Australian Arts in Asia Awards. The inaugural awards, held at Luna Park last night, recognise, celebrate and promote the significant number of Australian artists engaging in Asia to foster stronger, deeper and broader cultural links with Asian nations. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer and Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski attended last night’s awards ceremony and Mr Myer presented the award for Community Engagement. “It’s pleasing to see such a large number of outstanding arts projects across Asia being acknowledged for their excellence.” Australia Council Board member Lee-Ann Buckskin presented the Indigenous award. On behalf of the Australia Council, Mr Grybowski congratulated both those nominated and the winners. “The Australian Arts in Asia Awards celebrate and acknowledge the fantastic work Australian artists and arts organisations are producing and sharing with our Asian neighbours,” Mr Grybowski said. “The quality, breadth and diversity of the work of those nominated was impressive, and we are proud to have supported many of the artists and arts organisations over time.” The Australia Council has for many years invested in touring and artists residencies in Asia through funding Asialink, Australia's leading centre for the promotion of public understanding of the countries of Asia and of Australia's role in the region. In 2012, the Australia Council supported artists and organisations for tours, exhibitions and collaborations in about 20 countries across Asia.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (103 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-08-15 Australia Council & IETM project director returns to Melbourne The Australia Council for the Arts and the International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) project director Sophie Travers has returned from her base in Brussels to continue her role in Melbourne. Australia Council Director Market Development Collette Brennan said Ms Travers had relocated to Melbourne to work closely with Australian artists and link them to the IETM network. “Sophie is an experienced arts producer with an extensive knowledge of the Australian and European performing arts sectors,” Ms Brennan said. “She has been based in IETM’s Brussels office since January 2012 as part of a joint initiative between the Australia Council and IETM. “The partnership began in 2009 to support Australian artists, companies and producers to develop collaborative projects in Europe to build their artistic practice, skills and capacity to work internationally and access new audiences and markets for their work. “During her time in Brussels, Sophie developed a curated program of activities to increase engagement between Europe and Australia and supported the Australian performing arts sector to develop its networks, contacts and partnerships within the European Union.” Ms Brennan said Ms Travers would continue to support the Australian delegation, attending the IETM’s twice-yearly plenary meetings and provide information and advice to artists, arts organisations and IETM members. She would also develop strategic partnerships to encourage artistic collaboration and exchange between Australia and Europe. “We’re delighted to have Sophie continue as part of the Market Development team at the Australia Council,” Ms Brennan said. “The knowledge and networks Sophie has developed in the role will continue to grow and benefit a vast array of Australian artists and arts organisations and European partners.” IETM Secretary General Nan van Houte said she was delighted Ms Travers could stay in the position she had fulfilled so successfully for the past one-and-a-half years. “Sophie’s knowledge of both the European and Australian art scenes and her skills as a networker, broker and communicator are highly respected,” Ms van Houte said. “She has proved, and will keep on showing us, that the reciprocal exchange of inspiration and creativity isn’t limited to neighbouring territories, nor does it have to stop when economies are in downfall.” To find out more about the IETM-Australia Council Collaboration Project, contact Sophie Travers.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (103 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-08-15 Australia Council Congratulates National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award winners The Australia Council for the Arts has acknowledged all nominees and winners of this year’s National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Awards. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM and Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski attended last night’s awards ceremony as part of a visit to Darwin to meet Northern Territory artists, arts organisations and government representatives from the sector. Mr Myer said it was a pleasure to be in Darwin to attend the awards, now in its 30th year, as well as the opening of the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair. “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts make a rich contribution to Australia’s diverse contemporary culture and national identity and it is important those achievements are recognised and celebrated through these awards”, Mr Myer said. “On behalf of the Australia Council, I congratulate the nominees and winners of this prestigious event.” Australia Council Board member Lee-Ann Buckskin also attended the ceremony and said the awards promoted appreciation and understanding of the quality and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art being produced right across Australia. “The awards are a great opportunity to showcase work from both established and emerging Indigenous artists from regional and urban Australia, working in both traditional and contemporary media,” Ms Buckskin said. Earlier in the day Ms Buckskin, who is also Manager Aboriginal Arts Development at Carclew Youth Arts Adelaide, gave the key note address at the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair. Her speech addressed this year’s theme: Our Art Makes More than a Living. Our Art is Living. The Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts programs support all artforms, including music, dance, theatre and storytelling, visual arts and crafts, writing, new media, community development, international activity and arts infrastructure. The Australia Council recognises the integral links between art, culture, language, heritage, land and sea, as well as customary law and the importance of developing and growing the Indigenous arts sector and its industries by supporting the creation, development, production, distribution and dissemination of artistic and creative works. While in Darwin, Mr Myer and Mr Grybowski met with Arts Minister Matthew Conlon, senior staff from the Department of Arts and Museums and various arts organisations funded by the Australia Council. Mr Grybowski said they also attended the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair and the Darwin Festival. “We were keen to gather feedback from our stakeholders and see the impressive art that is being produced here in the Northern Territory.”   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (103 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-08-15 Australia Council-funded Artists to Exhibit in Moscow The Australia Council for the Arts has announced five Australian artists have received grants to enable them to show their work at the 5th Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art next month. Australia Council Director Visual Arts Julie Lomax said the artists who received grants to produce new work for the exhibition were Isabel and Alfredo Aquilizan (QLD), Richard Bell (QLD), Jumaadi Jumaadi (NSW), Gosia Wlodarczak (VIC) and this year’s Australian representative at the Venice Biennale Simryn Gill (NSW). The artists will join around 80 other arts professionals from 39 countries at the month-long event, which will be held at the Manege Museum from 20 September to 20 October. Ms Lomax said the artists had been selected by Moscow Biennale Artistic Director, Catherine de Zegher, who was the curator of the Australian Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale and co-directed the 18th Biennale of Sydney, and this year’s topic was More Light, focusing on the concept of time and space. “The Australia Council is keen to support Australian artists so they can participate in significant international opportunities through our grants and initiatives,” Ms Lomax said. “Biennales are important for artists, as they expose their work to an international forum, including key curators, administrators and other artists from around the world. “This can lead to ongoing and significant collaborations, exhibition opportunities and valuable critical dialogue about an artists’ practice.” Ms Lomax said the Australian artists represented at the Moscow Biennale were among a highly competitive field of grant applicants, which were assessed by an expert peer panel made up of artists, administrators, curators and academics within the visual arts sector. “One of the artists, Gosia Wlodarczak, has an exhibition of her work now on show at Sofitel Sydney Wentworth until 30 September, as part of the hotel’s Artist in Residence program,” Ms Lomax said. “The assessment panel awarded Gosia a New Work grant because of the artistic excellence she has displayed throughout her career, which has been recognised nationally and internationally.” The Moscow Biennale builds on a strong year for visual artists supported by the Australia Council to exhibit internationally, which includes the Venice Biennale, Indigenous artist Lena Nyadbi’s artwork being installed on the roof of the Musee Du Quai Branly and the upcoming Australia at the Royal Academy, London show. In addition, the Australia Council provided $15.7 million to visual artists through grants and initiatives in 2011-12.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (103 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-08-26 IETM-Australia Council for the Arts Collaboration Project second program update 2012-2013 The IETM-Australia Council Collaboration Project is pleased to announce the second and final program of supported projects for the 2012-13 financial year. The aim of the project is to create new opportunities for Australian performing artists, companies and producers in Europe. Sophie Travers, Project Director seeks to match the market development aspirations of Australian artists with opportunities and resources. Residencies, exchanges and collaborations Going Nowhere is an international event exploring the ways that we, as artists and audiences can sustainably generate and share creative experience without getting on a plane. Building on the experience and outcomes of the inaugural Going Nowhere event in 2012, the project is supporting Melbourne’s Arts House to seek further international partners for the creation of collaborative works and the presentation of these in 2014. Arts House is being supported to research sustainable arts initiatives in Europe that have an interest in commissioning work and sharing presentation platforms. Arts House are active IETM members and this project speaks to urgent concerns expressed within the network. Having supported Brisbane based independent producer Britt Guy to travel to the IETM meeting in Zagreb in 2012, the project is now following up with support for her Dance Exchange with Slovenia and Croatia. In August 2013, choreographers Matthew Day and Rhiannon Newton will travel to Maribor in Slovenia to participate in the Nagib Festival. In September selected Eastern European and Australian solo dance artists will then come together over a two week period travelling between Zagreb, Rijeka and Dubrovnik to participate in a residency dance lab as part of Perforations Festival. This format is then repeated at the Brisbane Powerhouse in late September with the same artists. The Lab will open up an opportunity for ongoing dialogue between the European and Australian Dance communities, opening up communication for collaboration beyond the partnership. Sam Haren of Sandpit in South Australia will undertake a residency at Akuyeri Theatre in the far north of Iceland, in the framework of a developing partnership with the small but dynamic performing arts scene in Iceland. The Director of Akuyeri Theatre will host Haren in a residency in which he will work with the resident ensemble of young performers. She will host his research practice and make connections with the local arts community as well as introducing Sam to her networks in Rejkavik, where she is Director of the increasingly well known Lokal festival. Rockie Stone is a contemporary circus maker and Fran Swinn is a composer and musician. Together and separately they have been exploring improvised performance. Their interest in collaboration led them to working in Europe, in particular France, where there are extensive infrastructural resources for researching this kind of new performance. The project has supported their engagement with partners in France in a joint residency where they were both able to develop their practice and their relationships with producers and presenters that will lead to presentation opportunities, commissions and co-productions in future. Dublin Dance Festival In collaboration with Dublin Dance Festival and Arts Projects Australia, Sophie Travers produced an international presenter program during the Australian presentations at Dublin Dance Festival. Targeting fourteen influential presenters of contemporary dance in France, Scotland, England, Denmark, Sweden, Germany and Poland, she was able to put together several strong networking platforms for Lucy Guerin Inc, Ros Warby, Stephanie Lake and Larissa McGowan and their producers. Also included in the platform were Rosalind Richards of Artful, Anne Dunn of Sydney Dance Company, and Margie Medlin of Critical Path. In collaboration with On the Move and Asia Europe Foundation, Sophie Travers represented Australia Council at the Platform Meeting of Asian and European Cultural Mobility Funders in Prague in June. Attended by fifty representatives of all the major stakeholders in cross-cultural mobility, she was able to present the work of the Australia Council and its partners in supporting artists exchange between Australia, Asia and Europe.   Research, networking and advocacy Kath Papas, Melbourne based independent producer of diverse contemporary performance will be supported to travel to Belgium, Germany, UK and The Netherlands in 2013, to visit Kunstenfestivaldesarts, Tay Tong festival and Tanzmesse. Kath will continue the dialogue with presenters and artists regarding the contextualising of indigenous and cross-cultural work and how it is created and distributed in Europe. Her aspiration is to build markets for the artists with whom she works and to influence her producing of related events in Australia. Liz Burcham, Director of Metro Arts in Brisbane, was supported to attend the IETM meeting in Dublin to consolidate and extend some of the conversations she has initiated in Europe on behalf of the MAPS QLD and other independent artists supported by Metro Arts. Liz was also interested to form new relationships with presenter and producer peers in the run up to APAM in Brisbane where Metro Arts will form a connection to the local independent arts community alongside the arts market. Director of Ten Days on the Island Festival, Jo Duffy, was supported to attend the Dublin IETM meeting to connect with the larger than usual Greek contingent for commissioning, collaborating and exchange discussions linking the festival and the Greek Islands. The next IETM meeting will be held in Athens in October 2013, thus there were many independent producers, presenters and artists with whom Duffy could connect to create deeper, longer term relationships between Tasmanian, Australian and Greek arts communities. 2013-08-27 Australia Council congratulates Arts Music Awards winners The Australia Council has acknowledged those nominated and the winners of this year’s Art Music Awards. The awards, presented by the Australasian Performing Right Association and the Australian Music Centre, were held at the National Institute for Dramatic Art last night and were hosted by James Morrison. They recognise achievement in the composition, performance, education and presentation of Australian music. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM attended last night’s awards ceremony and presented several awards with the Minister for the Arts, the Hon Tony Burke. Mr Myer said the Art Music Awards were an important opportunity to celebrate the achievements in music over the past year of individuals and organisations, in education and in regional Australia. “The awards recognise the great service of these works to Australian music over the year across a number of categories,” Mr Myer said. “It was wonderful to join in the celebrations and hear live performances from Robin Fox, Sandy Evans and Nexus Quartet, James Morrison, Jonathon Dreyfus and William and Harry Morrison and The Black Arm Band. “Composer George Dreyfus was also a deserving recipient of the Award for Distinguished Services to Australian Music. “What an honour it was to represent the Australia Council, which plays a significant role in the music sector, not just in funding but also in policy and advocacy.” On behalf of the Australia Council, Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski congratulated both those nominated and the winners. “The Art Music Awards celebrate and acknowledge the fantastic contribution of Australian artists and arts organisations in Australian music, music education, experimental music, jazz and regional music,” Mr Grybowski said. “The quality, breadth and diversity of the work of those nominated was impressive, and we are proud to have supported many of the artists and arts organisations over time.” The Australia Council supports composers, musicians and organisations to create new music and present it to audiences through a number of grants. The grant programs aim to reflect and promote the diversity, excellence and energy of contemporary Australian musical culture. Applications are now open for a number of opportunities, including Project Fellowships, New Work and the Contemporary Music Touring Initiative. For more information go to http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/artforms/music For the complete list of Art Music Award winners, go to http://www.australianmusiccentre.com.au/awards/   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (103 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-09-03 Prestigious awards for community arts and cultural development leaders Three leaders in community arts and cultural development have been recognised by the Australia Council for the Arts at an annual awards ceremony held in Sydney last night. Australia Council Chair, Rupert Myer AM and Chief Executive Officer, Tony Grybowski presented the Community Arts and Cultural Development Awards, which celebrate practitioners who make a difference to their communities through their work. The major award recipients for 2013 are: Dr Paula Abood received the Ros Bower Award for artists with a proven record of high achievement in community arts and cultural development, with an emphasis on the philosophies and principles of equality, respect, and diversity. Sarah Emery received the Kirk Robson Award which recognises outstanding leadership from young people working in community arts and cultural development, particularly in the areas of reconciliation and social justice; and Lenine Bourke is this year’s recipient of the Community Partnerships Fellowship which supports artists with an outstanding record of achievement of at least 10 years practice to undertake a two-year program of further creative or professional development. “These three awards provide special recognition for inspirational arts practitioners who typically work and create in partnership with other practitioners and the community,” Mr Grybowski said. “Dr Paula Abood is an artist, writer and educator who has worked with culturally diverse communities for the past 25 years and changed the lives of many through community engagement. “Sarah Emery is a multi-arts practitioner and a qualified teacher who has partnered with health, education, welfare, youth and arts organisations to create collaborative projects with people marginalised by society. “Lenine Bourke focuses the majority of her work on engaging children, young people and those from diverse communities. “They have each made distinguished and generous contributions to the communities they work in and they are very worthy award recipients. We were delighted that members of the Bower and Robson families were in attendance at the awards ceremony to celebrate their achievements. Award recipients: Dr Paula Abood is from West Ryde in Sydney. She has written for performance, radio, literary publications and film, including Parenting Stories, Huriyya and her Sisters, The Afghan Women’s Dobaiti Project, The Book of African Australian Stories and Of Middle Eastern Appearance. She teaches Community and Cultural Development at Ultimo TAFE, is a committee member of the Arab Film Festival and works on storytelling projects with western Sydney communities. Sydney-based Sarah Emery is an Associate Director of Milk Crate Theatre, which helps artists who have experienced homelessness or social marginalisation to make theatre that creates change. She is also an independent artist with Heaps Decent and Shopfront, where she is Outreach Director. Lenine Bourke is from Annerley in Brisbane. She is the Artistic Director at Contact Inc and has led many other projects and arts organisations, including as Executive Director at Young People and the Arts Australia. She was the recipient of the Kirk Robson Award in 2006, and the Fellowship will support her undertake a two-year professional and creative development program, which will involve exploring professional placements and collaborations. Background to the Community Arts and Cultural Development Awards: Ros Bower was a journalist, television producer and community arts pioneer. After joining the Australia Council as a policy officer, she identified areas of arts activities not eligible for subsidies and became a passionate advocate for what was to become known as community arts. She became the founding Director of the Australia Council’s first Community Arts Board. The Ros Bower Award was initiated in her honour by by her former colleagues. It was first awarded in 1981. Kirk Robson was a community and cultural development artist who tragically died in a car crash in 2005. He received the Australia Council’s Young and Emerging Artists Initiative in 2002. He was the Artistic Director of The Torch Project, a community and cultural development company that uses theatre as a means to explore critical issues. Highlights included The Bridge (2003), Idol Quest (2004) and the films Faith (2005) and his first documentary The Turning of the Tide (2004). After his death, the Australia Council renamed one of the three annual Young Leaders Awards in his honour. Past winners of the Ros Bower and Kirk Robson awards include Lockie McDonald, Steve Payne, Alissar Chidiac, Shakthi Shakthidharan, Jade Lillie and Alexandra Kelly.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).    Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-09-19 Executive appointments complete Australia Council leadership team Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski today announced the appointment of two new executive directors to complete the organisation’s senior leadership team. Following an extensive executive recruitment process, Mr Grybowski said Lissa Twomey had been appointed Executive Director, Arts Organisations and Wendy Were appointed Executive Director, Arts Development. The re-establishment of the leadership team comes after the appointment of previous executive directors Libby Christie and Rose Hiscock to other senior positions outside the organisation. “Both Lissa and Wendy are outstanding arts administrators, leaders and advocates across various fields and their combined talents, knowledge and experience will be an enormous asset to the Australia Council in this exciting period of change,” Mr Grybowski. “They each have extensive multi-arts expertise drawn from the successful delivery of major events and festivals, and they possess a great working knowledge of international and Australian arts culture, including our unique rural and regional arts. “Lissa and Wendy join a highly professional and energetic leadership team at the most dynamic period of transformation in the Australia Council’s 40 year history. We congratulate them on their appointments and look forward to their arrival.” Originally from country NSW, Lissa Twomey studied piano performance at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and internationally, as well as performing extensively as a musician and dancer. In two decades in arts administration, Lissa has developed an enviable reputation as an Artistic Director specialising in multi-arts festivals. She directed New Zealand’s premier cultural event - the New Zealand International Arts Festival – between 2006 and 2012 and the inaugural Wellington Jazz Festival in 2009. She was also integral in delivering the Sydney Festival from 1998 to 2005. Lissa will join the Australia Council immediately and lead the Arts Organisations team that actively manages Council’s relationship with more than 200 regularly funded organisations across the spectrum of our arts sector. Perth-based Wendy Were has an exceptional record in championing the development of sustainable career paths for Australia’s artistic workers and in developing creative and cultural industry policy. She is currently the Chief Executive Officer of the West Australian Music Industry Association, the peak music body responsible for supporting, nurturing and growing all forms of contemporary music in WA, and was previously a business advisor and mentor to artistic companies at the Creative Industries Innovation Centre. Wendy is a leading festival director and arts manager, and from 2006 to 2010 she was the Artistic Director and Chief Executive of the Sydney Writers Festival, overseeing an increase in participation and revenue. Wendy will commence her new role of leading the development of markets and audiences for Australian artists from late January 2014. Mr Grybowski praised Collette Brennan for her contribution as Acting Executive Director, Arts Development and confirmed she would remain in that role until the end of January. Mr Grybowksi said the executive appointments completed an extensive period of rebuilding across the Australia Council that included the appointment of a new skills-based Board on 1 July, and the ongoing evolution of peer assessment and strategy panels to ensure Council was more responsive to the needs of artists and organisations.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-09-19 Vale Bernie McGann The Australia Council acknowledges the passing of significant Australian jazz musician Bernie McGann, who was the recipient of the Australia Council’s Don Banks Music Award in 1998. The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to his family and friends. Read more about Bernie’s extraordinary career: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/vale-bernie-mcgann-king-of-jazz-20130918-2tzn5.html  http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/jazz-musicians-lament-the-loss-of-a-cherished-elder-statesman/story-e6frg8n6-1226722308225 2013-09-24 Vale Christopher Koch The Australia Council acknowledges the passing of significant Australian author Christopher Koch. Mr Koch was the recipient of the Australia Council’s Emeritus Award in 2007 and the Literature Fellowship on two occasions. The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to his family and friends. Read more about Christopher’s prolific career. 2013-09-27 Research shows involvement in the arts has wide-ranging benefits for young people A joint study by the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Education and Social Work and the Australia Council for the Arts has found that engagement in the arts benefits students not just in the classroom, but also in life. Students who are involved in the arts have higher school motivation, engagement in class, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, researchers discovered. The results, published in the latest issue of the prestigious Journal of Educational Psychology, found students who participate in dance, drama, music, and visual arts showed more positive academic and personal wellbeing outcomes than students who were not as involved in the arts. Academic outcomes included motivation, homework completion, class participation, enjoyment of school, and educational aspirations, while personal wellbeing measures considered such factors as self-esteem, life satisfaction, and a sense of meaning or purpose. Some of the strongest effects were found for students who spent high amounts of quality time in creative and performing arts subjects at school. Positive effects also resulted from home influences, such as how often parents and their children talked about and participated in the arts. Active participation, more than simply being an observer or audience member, also yielded stronger positive effects on school and personal wellbeing outcomes in the study. According to lead author, Professor Andrew Martin: “The study shows that school participation in the arts can have positive effects on diverse aspects of students’ lives. “Whereas most previous research has been small-scale or focused on students’ enjoyment in specific arts subjects, such as music, dance, drama, and visual arts, our research was large-scale and assessed outcomes beyond the arts domain,” he said. “It shows that the arts can impact broader academic and personal wellbeing outcomes for young people.” At a time when different subject areas must compete for space in the school curriculum, the study’s findings also emphasise the importance of the arts in the school curriculum, according to Associate Professor Michael Anderson, one of the study’s co-authors. “This study provides new and compelling evidence that the arts should be central to schooling and not left on the fringes,” he said. Australia Council Acting Director Community Partnerships Dr David Sudmalis said the results raised significant policy implications for how arts-based learning is integrated into the school curriculum. “Not only does this study demonstrate that the arts help deliver positive outcomes in engagement and motivation for students outside of the arts domain, it also shows that high quality, participatory arts education has the greatest impact,” Dr Sudmalis said. “These important findings show the significance of partnerships between the arts and education sectors, where artists and teachers work together to develop students’ expertise in and through the arts.” The analysis was funded by the Australian Research Council, in partnership with the Australia Council for the Arts. The study team, led by Professor Andrew Martin, included Associate Professor Michael Anderson, Dr Robyn Gibson, and Ms Marianne Mansour, all from the University of Sydney, as well as Dr David Sudmalis from the Australia Council of the Arts. A copy of the research is available at the Journal of Educational Psychology website. Media enquiries: Kate Mayor, 02 9351 2208, 0434 561 056, kate.mayor@sydney.edu.au or Kirsten Andrews, 02 9114 0748, Kirsten.Andrews@sydney.edu.auAll interviews for Australia Council for the Arts with Dr David Sudmalis contact: Karen Smith, 02 9215 9030, K.Smith@australiacouncil.gov.au  Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).    Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-10-08 Vale John Peart The Australia Council acknowledges the tragic passing of significant Australian painter John Peart.  The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to his family and friends.  Read more about John Peart’s prolific career. 2013-10-14 Supporting music to the tune of $1.3m A country singer, an experimental music festival and a chamber music company are some of the artists and organisations to benefit from more than $1.3 million in the latest round of funding from the Australia Council for the Arts. Australia Council Director Music Paul Mason said the grants would help musicians create new work, perform live and tour nationally and internationally. “We received applications from all over Australia in a diverse range of genres, including chamber music, rock bands, jazz and Baroque opera, and the standard was extremely high.“The recent increased funding to the Australia Council has allowed us to fund more artists in all of these categories, which is great news for Australian music.” Artists funded include Queensland country music singer songwriter Graham Rodger (Paterson, Qld), Rudely Interrupted, a Melbourne rock band consisting of members living with disadvantage and disability, and Adelaide composer Graeme Koehne. “Graham Rodger will use his grant to tour remote parts of southwest Queensland, Rudely Interrupted will use their funds to write and record new material, and Graeme Koehne will compose the score for a dance theatre work based on David Malouf’s short story The Empty Lunch Tin,” Mr Mason said. “Other artists to benefit include Chamber Music Adelaide for artists’ performance fees, Darwin Indigenous singer songwriter and former Saltwater Band member Manuel Dhurrkay to record a solo album, and Adalita to tour nationally. “Several artists have been supported to perform at the CMJ Music Marathon in New York later this year, including Hermitude, Courtney Barnett and Oh Mercy. “A number of festivals were also funded, including the inaugural eclectic and experimental music event New Weird Australia, which will be held in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney in March 2014, and The West African Festival to be held at Sydney’s Darling Harbour in November. The Australia Council’s music grants support composers, musicians and organisations to create new music and present it to audiences. The grants aim to reflect and promote the diversity, excellence and energy of contemporary Australian musical culture. The applications were assessed by industry peers, including Deborah Conway (Vic), Holly Throsby (NSW), Lawrence English (Qld), Damien Armstrong (NT), Gabriella Smart (SA) and Johannes Luebbers (WA). The following number of applications were received and funded: New Work - 171 applications, 44 funded. Presentation and Promotion - 82 applications, 23 funded. International Pathways – 35 applications, 11 funded. International Showcase/Managers – 25 applications, 9 funded. Contemporary Music Touring Program – 36 applications, 12 funded. For more information on Australia Council music grants go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/artforms/music   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-10-17 Australia Council drives discussion at National Writers’ Congress The Australia Council for the Arts Director Literature Jill Eddington and Literature Strategy Panel Chair Sophie Cunningham will inform writers and publishers how the organisation’s recent changes can provide strategic funding support and build on peer assessment at this week’s National Writers’ Congress: Authorship 20/20 in Sydney. The Australia Council is supporting the inaugural congress, which is being presented by the Australian Society of Authors at the Australian National Maritime Museum from Thursday 17 October to Saturday 19 October. Ms Eddington said the recent increased funding to the Australia Council had seen more writers funded and a discussion she would chair on Saturday would explore how the organisation’s review and legislative changes could provide a more strategic approach to investment in literature.The discussion, titled A National Cultural Policy or more Australian Content?, will feature as panelists Sophie Cunningham, Stuart Glover, former Australia Council Literature Board member and Meg Vann, CEO of the Queensland Writers’ Centre. Ms Eddington said she was delighted to be part of the event and that the Australia Council was able to support it as well as provide funds for the directors of each state and territory’s writers’ centres to attend. “This event is a great opportunity to bring together leaders in the literature sector, including publishers, writers’ organisations and authors,” Ms Eddington said. “The digital age and the increased popularity of mobile devices, such as tablets, have created challenges for authors and publishers and forums such as these provide information on the latest trends in reading and publishing, writing practices and opportunities available in this technology-driven environment.” Ms Eddington said she and Ms Cunningham would also use the congress to inform participants how the Australia Council could assist authors develop their craft and publish their work. “The Australia Council offers several types of assistance to writers and publishers, including grants for new work, fellowships and overseas residencies,” Ms Eddington said. “In 2011-12, $5.9 million was spent to support artists and organisations through these initiatives.” The National Writers’ Congress coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Australian Society of Authors, which is a key organisation funded by the Australia Council. Other speakers at the event include award-winning writer Anna Funder, children’s author Libby Gleeson and broadcaster and columnist Richard Glover. For more information on the congress, go to: https://asauthors.org/event/9085/authorship-2020   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).    Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-10-21 Australia Council connects performing artists from Asia, Europe and Australia Performing arts leaders from Europe and Asia will descend on Melbourne next May as part of a knowledge and cultural exchange event to increase international collaboration and engagement. The Australia Council for the Arts and the International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) will present the three-day meeting in partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne (Asian Performing Arts Program) and Next Wave from Monday 12 May to Wednesday 14 May 2014. It will be held at Arts Centre Melbourne. Australia Council Acting Executive Director Arts Development Collette Brennan said this was the first IETM Satellite meeting to be held in Australia, bringing together the most prestigious and innovative performing arts producers and presenters from Europe, Asia and Australia.“IETM is the largest and oldest European network for the performing arts with more than 500 members from 50 countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan and Australia,” Ms Brennan said. “In the past decade IETM has sought to broaden its membership outside Europe and a number of the biannual meetings have been held in Asia, including Singapore, China and Japan. “A meeting in Australia has been discussed for a number of years, and this event will build on the existing partnerships and artistic opportunities already established in the region. “The event will bring together key players in the Asian, European and Australian performing arts sector to share expertise, build partnerships and create strong networks to facilitate the development of future projects. “Australian performing artists and arts organisations will have unique access to influential and dynamic European and Asian arts leaders and the opportunity to showcase the diverse talent we have in our region.” The meeting coincides with the Next Wave Festival and delegates will participate in its events held on Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 May. The festival will present a range of new work from innovative Australian and international performing and visual artists, including theatre, dance, media and installation art. “Delegates will enjoy a curated weekend of activities that have been programmed for this year’s festival and meet some of the artists and producers involved,” Ms Brennan said. “The IETM Satellite meeting will start on the Monday and delegates can look forward to interesting presentations and speakers from some of the world’s leading performing arts companies, workshops with industry peers and making new contacts within the sector.” Australian participants in the satellite meeting will be selected by an Expressions of Interest process. Artists and arts workers from across the nation with a proven track record of working in Asia are invited to submit an application. Applicants will need to meet selection criteria to ensure those participating are able to follow up on the opportunities created by this significant meeting. Interested companies should contact Australia Council IETM Collaboration Project Director Sophie Travers via email: s.travers@australiacouncil.gov.au   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).    Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-10-31 VALE Marea Gazzard AM 1928 – 2013 The Australia Council acknowledges the passing on Monday 28 October 2013 of Marea Gazzard AM. Marea Gazzard was an influential and significant artist who practiced in sculpture and clay. Her works are held in many significant private collections as well as in Australia’s leading art institutions, including the Art Gallery of South Australia, the Art Gallery of Western Australia, the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, Queensland Art Gallery and the SH Ervine Gallery, which held a major retrospective in 1994. The Australia Council is proud to have funded Marea a number of times, including the Australia Artists Creative Fellowship in 1989. Marea was also a leader and advocate for the visual arts and in particular the craft sector. In 1973 she was the inaugural chair of the Crafts Board of the Australia Council. She also held positions of huge importance nationally and internationally including: 1970 Director of the World Craft Council 1972 Vice President of the World Crafts Council for Asia 1980 First elected President of the World Craft Council 1982 Australian National Commission of UNESCO Australia Council Executive Director Arts Funding Frank Panucci paid tribute to Marea and her work. “Marea Gazzard was a valued artist and an incredible advocate for the artistic community,” Mr Panucci said. “She will be sorely missed by many and The Australia Council acknowledges and thanks her for the huge contribution she made to the sector through her service as the chair of the Crafts Board.” Read more about Marea Gazzard AM 2013-11-01 Frank Moorhouse honoured by Australia Council The Australia Council for the Arts has recognised the outstanding contribution of writer Frank Moorhouse AM by awarding him the 2013 Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature. The Australia Council and members of the writing and publishing community will pay tribute to Mr Moorhouse at a ceremony at the State Library of NSW on Thursday, 21 November. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said he was “delighted the Council could recognise the work of Frank Moorhouse through this award given the profound impact he has had on Australian literature.” Council Literature Strategy Panel Chair Sophie Cunningham said Frank Moorhouse was one of the country’s most influential writers. “It is always difficult to select just one person from those nominated, but Frank’s highly influential, always timely and extraordinary contributions to Australian literature over so many years was hard to beat,” Ms Cunningham said. “The assessors wanted to recognise Frank for his lifetime of work as a writer, which started more than five decades ago in 1957, with a short story published in the Southerly journal at the age of 18. “Throughout his illustrious career Frank has gone on to win every major national prize for novels, short stories, essays and film scripts. “It gives us enormous pleasure to award him the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature for 2013.” Frank Moorhouse has written many seminal works, including his Edith trilogy, which follows the life of an idealistic Australian woman and her career at the League of Nations and later the International Atomic Energy Agency. One of these books, Dark Palace, won the Miles Franklin Award. His other novels explore themes of small town life, the Australian bush, travel, Australia’s diplomatic relationship with the world and the changing nature of male, female and gay identity. Early in his career he developed a writing structure, which he called ‘discontinuous narrative’, and his literary innovations have generated numerous academic studies. Frank has written three feature films based on his work, including The Coca-Cola Kid, which was an official entry in the Cannes Film Festival, and his article The Writer in a Time of Terror won the Victorian Premiers’ Literary Award’s Alfred Deakin Prize for Essay Advancing Public Debate and a Walkley Award for Social Equity Journalism. The Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature, formerly the Writers’ Emeritus Award, acknowledges the achievements of eminent literary writers over the age of 60 who have made an outstanding and lifelong contribution to Australian literature. Writers must be nominated for the award and demonstrate the literary eminence and importance of previous work. Past winners include Bruce Dawe (2000), the late Christopher Koch (2007) and Herb Wharton (2012).   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).    Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-04 2014 grants information sessions for Theatre In November and December 2013, the Theatre section of the Australia Council will be holding a series of information sessions around the country for our 2014 grant categories. We will also be meeting individually with artists and organisations seeking to apply for our first closing date of the year on 10 February 2014. With the commencement of the Australia Council Act 2013 on 1 July, and the exciting changes Council is currently undergoing, we have simplified our 2014 Theatre categories to help us transition to a more unified approach to cross-Council categories in 2015 and beyond. We hope you will be able to join us at one of our sessions: DarwinThursday 21 November, 2013 11.30am – 12.30pm Conference Room at the Arts NT office First Floor, 9–11 Cavenagh Street, Darwin (next to the Roma Bar) One-on-one meetings will be available from 1.30pm – 5pm, Thursday 21 November (20 minute sessions starting on the half-hour). To RSVP for the information session and to book a one-on-one meeting, please email w.stanton@australiacouncil.gov.au AdelaideFriday 22 November, 2013 10 – 11am Adelaide Festival Centre King William Road, Adelaide One-on-one meetings will be available from 11am – 5pm, Friday 22 November (20 minute sessions starting on the half-hour). To RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email t.richardson@australiacouncil.gov.au MelbourneThursday 28 November, 2013 11am – 12pm Large Meeting Room, Meat Market 5 Blackwood Street, North Melbourne One-on-one meetings will be available from 12.30pm – 5pm, Thursday 28 November and 9.30am – 5pm, Friday 29 November (20 minute sessions starting on the half-hour). To RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email a.gill@australiacouncil.gov.au BrisbaneThursday 5 December, 2013 5.30 – 6.30pm The Studio, Metro Arts 109 Edward Street, Brisbane One-on-one meetings will be available from 9.30am – 5pm, Friday 6 December (20 minute sessions starting on the half-hour). To RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email a.gill@australiacouncil.gov.au Hobart Thursday 28 November, 2013 10 – 11am The Founders Room, Salamanca Arts Centre 77 Salamanca Place, Hobart One-on-one meetings will be available from 11am – 5pm on Thursday 28 November (20 minute sessions starting on the half-hour) To RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email t.richardson@australiacouncil.gov.au Canberra Tuesday 10 December, 2013     11.30am - 12.30pm The Street Theatre - Street Two 15 Childers Street, Canberra City West   One-on-one meetings with Canberra will be available from 1.30pm – 5pm on Tuesday 10 December (20 min sessions, starting on the half hour). To RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email w.stanton@australiacouncil.gov.au PerthWednesday 4 December, 2013 2.30 – 3.30pm Rehearsal Room 2, State Theatre Centre of WA Corner of William and Roe Streets, Perth   One-on-one meetings will be available from 9.30am – 5pm on Thursday 5 December. One-on-one meetings will take place at: Large Meeting Room Level 1, Kings St Arts Centre 365 Murray Street, Perth   To  RSVP for the information session and book a one-on-one meeting, please email a.gill@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-04 New international leadership program now open The Australia Council for the Arts and the International Society of Performing Arts (ISPA) are offering performing arts professionals an opportunity to develop their leadership skills as part of a new mentoring program. Australia Council Chief Executive Tony Grybowski said the Arts Legacy Program was supported by the council and would be delivered by ISPA. It will provide access to ISPA’s extensive international network of arts professionals for five early to mid-career leaders from Australia’s performing arts community. “The Australia Council identified a gap in leadership training for arts leaders and has responded by establishing the Capacity Development Program to build on these skills through scholarships, partnerships with other organisations and mentoring,” Mr Grybowski said. “Performing arts professionals who are committed to advancing the sector in a global context would benefit most from the program. “It is important the council provides initiatives which nurture future leaders in the arts sector. “This kind of professional development fosters viable and stimulating careers and enhances the capacity of those leading our important arts organisations. “The Arts Legacy Program is a new part of the wider initiative and will provide participants with the opportunity to exchange ideas with leaders from some of the world’s most significant arts organisations, artist management agencies, cultural policy groups, foundations and festivals. “It will be offered for up to three years and includes in the first year a full pass registration to the New York 2014 ISPA Congress, Imagining a new economy for the arts, in January, travel and accommodation expenses and a mentor through participation in ISPA’s Community Building Program.” Pending a successful review, candidates will be eligible to participate for up to two more years. The Arts Legacy Program builds on the successful Emerging Leaders Development Program, which is now taking applications. The Emerging Leaders Development Program is a five-day residential workshop, followed by mentoring and coaching with respected senior executives. Like the Arts Legacy Program, participants will enhance their leadership skills, establish important contacts in the arts sector and share knowledge and learn from experienced facilitators. Program costs, including meals and accommodation, will covered by The Australia Council. Applications for both programs close on Friday, 22 November and successful applicants will be advised in December. To apply for the Arts Legacy Program, go to http://www.ispa.org/?page=legacy_australia To apply for the Emerging Leaders Development Program, go to http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2013/eldp For more information on the Australia Council’s Capacity Development Program, contact Ricardo Peach at r.peach@australiacouncil.gov.au   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-08 New sustainability initiative in Melbourne The Australia Council for the Arts and the City of Melbourne have partnered on an innovative project to support theatre artists to incorporate environmental sustainability in making their work. The Greenie-in-Residence pilot project will provide a number of Melbourne-based artists and organisations from the small-to-medium theatre sector with an environmental sustainability expert. Melbourne presenter and producer Arts House has been chosen to manage the project, and have appointed Matt Wicking to provide guidance over 12 months to selected theatre clients. He will help them to develop and incorporate green practices into their work, including sustainability plans, advice on sustainable production material and recycling, and carbon offsetting for travel and touring. Matt has 10 years experience in the sustainability area, having worked for organisations such as VicSuper, and Monash Sustainability Institute’s award-winning Green Steps education Program. He is also Associate Producer for TippingPoint Australia. Australia Council Director Theatre Lyn Wallis said both the council and the City of Melbourne recognised environmental sustainability was a key concern for many members of the small-to-medium performing arts sector. “The theatre sector has demonstrated a capacity to lead in this area, but needs support to do this,” Ms Wallis said. “The Melbourne pilot will help us learn how to do that in the most effective way.” Instigated by the Theatre section of the Australia Council, Greenie-in-Residence is intended to benefit the small-to-medium theatre sector by creating a base to share knowledge and conversation about sustainability practice. In the short term, a select number of Melbourne artists and companies will benefit from expert advice and hands-on help, but it is hoped the pilot will produce case studies and materials to help inform the broader theatre sector. City of Melbourne Manager of Arts and Culture Jane Crawley said the City had been committed to assisting its resident artists and companies to engage with sustainable practice for some time. “Many are well-placed to take full advantage of this new resource, and it’s exciting to know that the best-practice examples it produces will provide leadership to the rest of the sector in this area” Ms Crawley said. Arts House is now calling for proposals from members of the small-to-medium theatre sector interested in being involved in the Greenie-in-Residence pilot program. Applications close on Friday 29th November 2013. To apply and for more information, please go to the Arts House’s website: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/ArtsHouse/Programs/Pages/GreenieInResidence.aspx   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-14 Australia Council Annual Report released Australian artists and arts organisations benefited from $174.8 million in funding from the Australia Council for the Arts during 2012-13, with continued focus on investment in artistic vibrancy, excellence and sustainability across the sector. Australia Council Chair, Rupert Myer AM, acknowledged that this was the last Annual Report under the 1975 Act, and extended his thanks to staff, peers, Council and art form board members, and the arts sector for their support and contributions during this transformative time in the Council’s history. “The Council is delighted to have provided funding for such a richly diverse and talented group of artists and arts organisations during this past year, highlighting the level of excellence and creative imagination across art forms and geographic locations. The breadth of international projects and audience engagement strongly expresses Australia’s cultural profile overseas, and the vibrancy of our arts sector,” Mr Myer AM said. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer, Tony Grybowski, said 2012-13 was a strong year for the Council with the number of artistic works presented increasing by 37 per cent from the year before, most notably in literature works, community partnership projects, regional touring programs and arts development programs, such as Hopscotch and Art Fare. Key outcomes in the Annual Report include: 15 million attendances at Australia Council supported activities 2,021 grants and projects funded by the Australia Council 8,856 new artistic works created with Australia Council support 7,034 new artistic works presented, performed, published or exhibited with Australia Council support 1,019 individual artists funded (directly and devolved*) 168 organisations funded through Key Organisations multi-year grants and the Major Performing Arts Framework The Council delivered a number of international initiatives designed to strengthen the profile of Australian artists overseas and increase opportunities for market development and cultural exchange. Flagship international initiatives included the Venice Biennale, Lena Nyabi Barramundi Scales on the rooftop of the Musée Du Quai Branly in Paris, Nashville Songwriter Residency pilot, and International Symposium on Electronic Art. Council funding also supported programs focused on increasing participation in the arts in under represented communities, including regional arts, multicultural arts, and artists and audiences with a disability. Initiatives included: $8.7 million for international activities by Australian artists and arts organisations $7.9 million for arts and cultural activities with a predominantly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander focus $21.1 million for arts and cultural activities with a predominantly regional focus $5.4 million for the Regional Touring Program, including $4.7 million with a national focus. “With the recent changes that have occurred to the governance structure of the Australia Council, there is a strong sense of renewal and engagement with the sector. The new board is leading work on a five-year strategic plan which will be reflective of the functions of the Australia Council as prescribed in the new Act, and implemented through a rolling Corporate Plan. The current planning process will redefine our strategic focus and enhance the way we support the arts in Australia.” Mr Grybowksi said.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-22 Frank Moorhouse honoured at award ceremony The Australia Council for the Arts has recognised the outstanding contribution of writer Frank Moorhouse AM at a celebration held last night with his peers at the State Library of NSW. Mr Moorhouse received The Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature at the event. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said Mr Moorhouse had been a popular choice for this year’s award and it was pleasing to see so many of his peers at last night’s celebration. “It is important that we acknowledge the contribution of writers such as Frank Moorhouse and he is a very worthy winner of this award,” Mr Grybowski said. Australia Council Literature Strategy Panel Chair Sophie Cunningham said Frank Moorhouse was one of the country’s most influential writers. “It is always difficult to select just one person from those nominated, but Frank’s highly influential, intelligent, timely and sparkling contributions to Australian literature over so many years was hard to beat,” Ms Cunningham said. “Frank’s Edith is one of the great characters of Australian literature, but his career covers a lot more ground than that extraordinary achievement. “The assessors wanted to recognise Frank for more than fifty-five years work as a writer, as well as his broader advocacy for writers and their work. “It gave us great pleasure to give him the award and we plan to hold him to his promise to keep on writing.” President of the Australian Publishers Association Louise Adler, who nominated Mr Moorhouse, said he was one of Australia’s most illustrious living writers and his themes were universal and cosmopolitan while always authentically Australian. “He is a highly original writer, courageous, inventive and dazzlingly creative,” Ms Adler said. “His Edith trilogy is a magisterial work that takes Australia to the world and brings the world home to Australia in a hugely original literary endeavour. “He has always passionately yet lucidly advocated for literature, has been an intellectual colleague of great generosity of spirit towards the community of writers and he has actively supported the book industry.” Mr Moorhouse said although winning the award reminded him of the passing of time he was very pleased to receive it. “It is something of a pinnacle as there is no other award like it in Australia and it is the most substantial,” Mr Moorhouse said. Mr Moorhouse said writing the Edith trilogy was the highlight of his career, for which he received an Australia Council Australian Artists Creative Fellowship in 1990 to research and write it. “They are historical novels and they have more universal appeal than perhaps my other books,” Mr Moorhouse said. “Being given the time to live abroad in Geneva and create the trilogy was a great privilege and the voyage of discovery was fascinating. “The writing of the books was a great experience in itself, regardless of winning awards.” Mr Moorhouse is now writing his second essay on Australia’s spy agency, ASIO, and the controversy surrounding its increase in power, and he plans to write another work of fiction – this time on Edith’s lover Ambrose. “It’s his side of the story and will look at what was going on when Edith wasn’t there,” Mr Moorhouse said. To watch Mr Moorhouse’s acceptance speech, go to http://vimeo.com/auscouncilarts/review/80014988/0aaf45fe56 ABOUT FRANK MOORHOUSE Frank Moorhouse was born in Nowra, NSW in 1938. He began writing more than five decades ago, with a short story published in the Southerly journal in 1957 when he was 18. Throughout his illustrious career Frank Moorhouse has won every major national prize for novels, short stories, essays and film scripts. He is perhaps best known for his Edith trilogy, which follows the life of an idealistic Australian woman and her career at the League of Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. One of these books, Dark Palace, won the Miles Franklin Award in 2001. His other novels explore themes of small town life, the Australian bush, travel, Australia’s diplomatic relationship with the world and the changing nature of male, female and gay identity. Early in his career he developed a writing structure, which he called ‘discontinuous narrative’, and his literary innovations have generated numerous academic studies. Frank has written three feature films based on his work, including The Coca-Cola Kid, which was an official entry in the Cannes Film Festival, and his article The Writer in a Time of Terror won the Victorian Premiers’ Literary Award’s Alfred Deakin Prize for Essay Advancing Public Debate and a Walkley Award for Social Equity Journalism. ABOUT THE AUSTRALIA COUNCIL AWARD FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN LITERATURE The Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature, formerly the Writers’ Emeritus Award, acknowledges the achievements of eminent literary writers over the age of 60 who have made an outstanding and lifelong contribution to Australian literature. Writers must be nominated for the award and demonstrate the literary eminence and importance of previous work. Past winners include Bruce Dawe (2000), the late Christopher Koch (2007) and Herb Wharton (2012).   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-25 Cat Hope next Peggy Glanville-Hicks resident West Australian composer Cat Hope has been chosen for this year’s Peggy Glanville-Hicks residency. The residency is a partnership between the Australia Council for the Arts and the Peggy Glanville-Hicks Composers’ Trust. The announcement will be officially made tonight at the Peggy Glanville-Hicks address in Sydney, which will be given by former Four Winds Festival Artistic Director, performer and current Australia Council Music Fellow Genevieve Lacey. Australia Council Director Music Paul Mason said Cat Hope was among a strong field of applicants and she was an outstanding candidate. “The Peggy Glanville-Hicks Composers’ Trust and the Australia Council are very pleased to be able to offer Cat Hope this opportunity for 12 months,” Mr Mason said. Ms Hope said it was a great privilege to be named this year’s Peggy Glanville-Hicks resident. “Firstly, I would like to show my appreciation to Peggy, for this great idea to leave her house to composers, but also to the Trust and the Australia Council for choosing me and managing the residency,” Ms Hope said. “This appointment means a lot to me, it provides me with a unique opportunity that I could only have dreamt of. “I am sure Peggy couldn’t even imagine the kind of music that myself and my collaborators will come up with during my time there. “I am very excited about having this time in Sydney in Peggy’s house to work on projects such as commissions for pianist Zubin Kanga, percussionist Vanessa Tomlinson, Icelandic ensemble Slatur, the London Improvisers Orchestra and the development of a new ‘noise opera’ with Jack Sargent. “I am also planning a number of recordings of existing compositions over the year.” Peggy Glanville-Hicks Composers Trust Chair Shane Simpson said the residency was given each year to Australian composers with a strong track record of achievement in the field. “In her will, Peggy bequeathed her house to be a composers’ haven – somewhere they could work without having to worry about the rent,” Mr Simpson said. “When you look at the list of composers who have had fellowships you see how wise she was.” Past residents include Gordon Kerry, Liza Lim, Julian Yu, Mary Finesterer, Andrew Ford, Julian Day, Matthew Hindson and Elena Kats-Chermin. In partnership with the Peggy Glanville-Hicks Composers Trust, the Australia Council has offered the residency through a competitive grant round since 2012. Applications are encouraged from composers and songwriters of all musical genres and the successful resident will also be provided with $20,000 to create new work and undertake professional development. Applications for the 2015 residency will open in June next year and close in July 2014. ABOUT CAT HOPE Cat Hope is a composer, sound artist, writer, performer, songwriter, artistic director and noise artist. She is a classically trained flautist, self taught vocalist and experimental bassist who plays as a soloist and as part of other groups, such as the multi bass improv project Abe Sada. She is the director of Decibel new music ensemble, which tours and performs her work and commissions others. In 2011 she won the Inaugural Award for Excellence in Experimental Music at the APRA AMC Art Awards and was a finalist in the WA Citizen of the Year Awards in the Arts and Culture category. In 2012 she won the People’s Choice in the Networked Performance Category for her piece Black Emperor in the International Space Time Concerto Competition. Her work tends to explore low frequency sound, drone, noise, glissandi and graphic scores. ABOUT PEGGY GLANVILLE-HICKS Peggy Glanville-Hicks was born in Melbourne in 1912 and died in Sydney in 1990. She won an international reputation as a composer and music critic and is one of the few women of her time to achieve such distinction. The majority of her works were written in America between the 1940s and 1960s and many have been recorded, including two of her four operas. One of those operas, The Transposed Heads, premiered in Louisville in 1954 and New York in 1958. Her 1963 opera Sappho, recently recorded with an all-star cast (Toccata Classics), is yet to be produced on stage. The recording of her Sonata for Harp, recorded by Marshall McGuire, won the 1996 APRA award for the most performed contemporary classical composition. Peggy Glanville-Hicks returned to Australia in the 1970s and became an important figure on the national music scene. In her will she bequeathed her house as a residence for composers.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-25 Fiona Hall AO to represent Australia at the 2015 Venice Biennale The Australia Council for the Arts today announced Fiona Hall AO has been selected to represent Australia at the 56th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale 2015. The Adelaide-based artist, who works across a broad range of media, will be the sole artist exhibiting at the newly constructed Australian Pavilion in the Giardini from May 2015. The exhibition will be curated by Linda Michael. Venice Biennale 2015 Commissioner Simon Mordant AM said he was delighted Fiona Hall had agreed to represent Australia at the most prestigious, international contemporary art exposition. “Fiona Hall is one of Australia’s foremost contemporary artists,” Mr Mordant said. “Her work is deeply thoughtful, insightful and engaging. I can’t wait to see the new works she will create for the exhibition in Venice.” Ms Hall said she was thrilled to be invited to represent Australia at the Venice Biennale in 2015. “It is a great honour to be offered this opportunity to create the first exhibition in the new Australian Pavilion,” Ms Hall said. Fiona Hall first emerged in the 1970s as a photographer and during the 1980s she began working in a diverse range of artforms. The core theme throughout her work has been the relationship between nature and culture. A major retrospective of her work was held at Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane and toured to the Art Gallery of South Australia (both 2005) and the survey exhibition Fiona Hall: Force Field at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in partnership with City Gallery Wellington (2008) toured to Christchurch Art Gallery, New Zealand and Newcastle Art Gallery. She has been included in many important group exhibitions and biennales, such as ‘dOCUMENTA 13 (2012), the Third Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art (2009), The Biennale of Sydney (2000 and 2010), and Prism: Contemporary Australian Art at the Bridgestone Museum, Tokyo (2006). Her work has been collected by all major Australian State galleries as well as the National Gallery of Australia. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM said the Council was extremely pleased to have one of Australia’s most prominent contemporary artists exhibiting at the pavilion. “The Venice Biennale is the most important and prestigious event on the international contemporary arts calendar and the Council considers our involvement to be an important part of the way we promote Australian artists to international audiences,” Mr Myer said. “At this year’s biennale, about 200,000 people visited the Australian Pavilion to see Simryn Gill’s work and I have no doubt Fiona Hall’s exhibition will also attract an impressive number. “The 2015 Venice Biennale is a particularly exciting one for Australia, as it will be the first year the new pavilion, designed by Denton Corker Marshall, will be open.” Melbourne-based curator Linda Michael will return to the Venice Biennale after curating Australia’s 2003 exhibition of Patricia Piccinini’s work. She is the Deputy Director and Senior Curator at Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne and is also a respected editor and writer. Fiona Hall was selected by a seven-member expert panel comprising: Simon Mordant AM, Australian Commissioner for the Venice Biennale 2015, Chair of the Selection Advisory Panel and Chair, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia; Danie Mellor, artist and Chair Australia Council Visual Arts Strategy Panel; Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Curator, Rome and New York; Max Delany, Senior Curator, Contemporary Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Rachel Kent, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia; Suhanya Raffel, Director of Collections, Art Gallery of NSW; and Leigh Robb, Curator, Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts. Mr Mordant said he was delighted to announce the continued support of The Balnaves Foundation as the Major Partner and Maddocks, The University of Melbourne and White Rabbit Gallery as Supporting Partners. “Their long-term support, as well as the contribution of the Commissioner’s Council and many individual donors, ensures our presence in Venice is maximised to provide international opportunities for the Australian contemporary visual arts sector.” The Commissioner’s Council helps position Australia in Venice with its national membership, comprising Simon Mordant AM, Charles Green, Deputy Commissioner for Australia at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Hamish Balnaves, Anita Belgiorno-Nettis, Adrian Fini, Mark Henry, Ross Nielson, Roslyn Oxley, Lisa Paulsen and Nick Tobias.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-11-28 Australia Council joins John Monash scholarship program Fernando do Campo and Kathryn Roberts have been named as the first recipients of the new Australian Cultural John Monash Scholarships. The cultural scholarships are an exciting addition to the prestigious General Sir John Monash Foundation Scholarship program, supported by the Australia Council and Tim Fairfax AM. The announcement was made on Tuesday night at the Sydney Opera House. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM said he was pleased the Council was able to support an initiative which enables outstanding scholars to pursue international postgraduate studies in an area related to arts and culture. “This type of scholarship is important in building the capacity of our next generation of leaders, whose original thinking and global perspective will push the boundaries of Australia’s cultural ambitions. General Sir John Monash Foundation Chief Executive Officer Dr Peter Binks thanked the Australia Council and philanthropist Tim Fairfax AM for their support. “This is a special initiative and recognises the importance of the humanities to Australia,” Dr Binks said. “We received many high quality applications in the humanities in 2013 and our panels were impressed by the calibre of the field. “Fernando and Kathryn are outstanding new John Monash Scholars and will play important leadership roles for Australia in the future.” Fernando do Campo is from Tasmania and will use his scholarship to undertake a Masters of Fine Arts at Parsons New School, New York. Kathryn Roberts is from NSW and will do a Masters in Shakespeare Studies at Kings College, London. Since 2003 the General Sir John Monash Foundation has offered a range of scholarships in various disciplines in its postgraduate program. The scholarships provide postgraduate students with $50,000 a year for up to three years to complete their Masters or Doctoral degrees at the world’s elite universities. Scholars are chosen on their leadership skills, academic excellence and their commitment to the Australian community. ABOUT FERNANDO DO CAMPO Fernando do Campo (b. Mar del Plata, Argentina, 1987) is an artist, writer and curator based in Tasmania. Fernando is a graduate of both the University of Tasmania and the Australian National University, Canberra. From 2009-2013 he was the Director of Sawtooth ARI. Fernando has been the recipient of numerous awards, including in 2012; a studio residency at the Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris, an Arts Tasmania grant, an Artstart grant and Jump Mentorship (with Paul O’Neill, UK) both from the Australia Council for the Arts. He was named Young Tasmanian of the Year (Arts) earlier this year. During 2012 he presented solo exhibitions at Firstdraft ARI, Sydney, Devonport Regional Gallery, Tasmania and tcb Art Inc. Melbourne. In early 2013 he presented Nuclei, a collective project at FELTspace, Adelaide and at MoMa (MONA Markets, Hobart) and mounted a major solo exhibition titled Onomatopoeia at the Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania. Fernando was the Team Leader during the vernisagge of the Australian Pavilion’s presentation at this year’s 55th Venice Biennale and has just completed a three-month studio residency at Schloss Laudon, Vienna through BMUKK, the Austrian Ministry of Culture. Fernando is represented by Mclemoi Gallery, Sydney. ABOUT KATHRYN ROBERTS Kathryn Roberts is a professional musician and performance researcher working on developing interpretive processes around language, music and performance in theatre, particularly in relation to Shakespeare’s works. With the support of the General Sir John Monash Foundation, as well as Australia Council for the Arts and Tim Fairfax AM, Kathryn will be undertaking a Masters in Shakespeare Studies at Kings College London, which is run in partnership with Shakespeare’s Globe theatre. This will provide her with a unique opportunity to work with world-leading practitioners. Kathryn is always seeking to discover ways in which music can be used as a bridge across historical and cultural divides to create theatre, which is accessible and engaging for all kinds of audiences. She has worked as a dramaturg and musician with ABC Radio National, as well as companies such as the Globe and Rose Theatres in the UK as a researcher. Aside from her work on Shakespeare, Kathryn is co-pioneering a new theatre company based in Sydney, Matriark Art Theatre, producing new visual/physical works. Kathryn completed a Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours at the University of Sydney in 2012 and a Bachelor of Music Studies at Sydney Conservatorium of Music in 2011.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-12-03 New funding for artists with disability The Australia Council for the Arts will provide a new funding program for artists with disability. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski made three key announcements today, to mark the International Day of People with Disability. “Funding and accessibility for artists with disability is essential to our principles of diversity and excellence, and these new initiatives have been developed after extensive consultation with the sector.” Mr Grybowski said he was delighted to announce that $300,000 had been allocated to support the new Artists with Disability Program, to enable Australian artists with disability to create, develop, present, produce, exhibit and tour their work. “This pilot program will be launched in the first half of 2014, supported through the new Unfunded Excellence funding for 2013/14,” Mr Grybowski said. “Individuals and groups who identify as having disability can apply for grants of up to $10,000 for development and up to $20,000 for arts projects. Minister for the Arts, Senator George Brandis congratulated the Australia Council on today’s announcements which give greater funding, support and access to the arts for Australians with disability. “The International Day of People with Disability reminds us of the importance of ensuring Australians with disability have the opportunities to fully participate in social, economic and community life,” Senator Brandis said. “The commitments made by the Australia Council today will make the arts accessible to more Australians – as creators, as participants and as patrons – and help to recognise the contribution people with disability make to enrich our cultural landscape.” Mr Grybowski also released the Council’s Disability Action Plan for 2014-2016, and confirmed the Council’s commitment to embedding the intent of the plan across all aspects of the organisation. “The revised plan has a focus on leadership, accessibility and arts practice and builds on the Australia Council’s previous work in the area of disability,” Mr Grybowski said. “Some of the highlights include a leadership program for artists and arts workers with disability, including more peers with disability on assessment panels and further improving accessibility to the Australia Council’s website and online systems.” Mr Grybowski also announced that Arts Access Australia’s funding had been renewed for a further three years, and that they would receive an additional $150,000 from the Unfunded Excellence funding. The funds will support new projects to increase career development and employment opportunities for artists with disability. Arts Access Australia Chief Executive Officer Emma Bennison said the initiatives were most welcome. “These initiatives send a strong signal that the Australia Council is committed to the right of people with disability to full and equal access to the arts in Australia,” Ms Bennison said. “We look forward to leading an ongoing dialogue between the Australia Council and the arts and disability sector to ensure these initiatives have a lasting impact.” Editors’ note: The announcement of these new initiatives was live streamed. A live information session on the new grants program is being held today from 1.30pm to 2.30pm via the Australia Council’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/australiacouncil Australia Council staff will be running a series of information sessions about the new Artists with Disability Program across the country during January and February. Guidelines for the program will be available from 10 December as part of the Council’s 2014 Funding Guide.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Kate Clark, Director Communications | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9166 | 0498 002 931 | Email k.clark@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-12-04 Are we practicing respect? Respect Builds Cultural Ambition. Last Friday morning, at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, a large crowd gathered to attend a memorial service for the artist, Jeffrey Smart AO, who died earlier this year. Hosted by Director, Ron Radford AM, the Governor-General led the personal, affectionate, respectful and witty tributes to a man who lived life well and whose significant body of paintings will continue to reveal to generations the mysteriousness of his portrayals of familiar and mundane urban landscapes. A few days earlier, when it was announced in Sydney that Fiona Hall AO is to represent Australia at the Venice Biennale in 2015, the enthusiastic reaction from a wide number of people reflected strong support for the appointment and excitement for the possibilities of her collaboration with curator, Linda Michael. Continuing through to the middle of December in Melbourne, The Ring Cycle performed by Opera Australia has received accolades for the powerfully dramatic and beautifully performed telling of the story. Of particular note has been the way Neil Armfield AO has created a strong Australian production with many of the most talented in the nation involved in every aspect of the epic. In each of these instances, there is a palpable respect shown for the artist and those engaged directly in the creative process. They are being acknowledged as a potent and vital life force in the cultural life of the country. Along with high visibility events showcasing musicians, the film and television industry, writers and the performing arts, these are some of the occasions when Australian artists are given profile and status. If we are to succeed as a culturally ambitious nation, these and other forms of recognition, encouragement and respect are central to that quest. Our artists apply their talents and skills, often accumulated over long careers, to create images or performances that bring us insight, pleasure and even disruption. Often, they cause us to stop and reconsider our own lives as well as the lives of others. Occasionally, they challenge our views of our nation and its place in the world. The role that artists perform benefits each of us. However, these examples aside, other than a short-lived resurgence of interest at the time of death, appropriate public acknowledgment of artists is uneven, unpredictable and uncertain. During their working lives, even though a few may be recognised through our Honours system, many Australian artists are not just unrecognised but are often targets for a form of ‘sledging’ that we usually associate with the sporting arena. While the latter may be psychological warfare designed to put an opponent off his or her game, with artists the purpose seems to be to be to question their role, belittle their talent, censor their inventiveness or curb their imagination. In other more subtle savagery, the raw talent and ability of those artists that eschew publicity or choose not to embrace the arts media are overlooked. In the commentary around the Royal Academy’s Australia exhibition, while the brutality of a couple of critics who didn’t like the show succeeded in capturing our attention, over 40 contemporary artists had their work on display at one of the great venues of the world and many of them were present to be honoured at a dinner following the opening in the Academy’s Joshua Reynolds room. This respect shown to these artists and the curators responsible for the exhibition, the many favourable reviews and the reality of long queues of visitors to the triumphant exhibition should eliminate the cowering and apologetic attitude that some curiously expected us to adopt. On her launch in May in Canberra, Patricia Piccinini’s Skywhale was greeted with hostility by a sceptical media. The work and the artist were pilloried and mocked by commentators who probably knew better but did it anyway. Just as the arts sector started to rise to say “enough, you’ve had your fun: now grow up”, an interesting phenomenon occurred. Led by children and young people, the public became enchanted by the work and the media were stranded on the wrong side of the argument, looking dated and out of touch. As is the case in any profession, the respect that matters most to an artist is that of his or her peers. For artists, that often comes along before a wider public appreciation of their work. Too often the latter is too late, when we have missed the opportunity to join in its expression. A memorial service is a fine place to show respect to an artist and award ceremonies are too. However, we will all be the beneficiaries of an attitudinal change that has more respect shown for all forms of contemporary art practice and to the living. Rupert Myer AM Chair, Australia Council for the Arts 2013-12-20 Australia Council music fellowships announced Four outstanding Australian musicians and composers have received this year’s prestigious Music Fellowships from the Australia Council for the Arts. Australia Council Director Music Paul Mason said the music fellowships were an important way to recognise outstanding, established artists and provided an opportunity for them to create work for up to two years. “Successful fellows will have demonstrated significant achievement nationally or internationally and have created a body of highly regarded work,” Mr Mason said. “This year’s fellows are a diverse and accomplished line up of performers, composers and producers who cover musical theatre, classical, contemporary popular and contemporary art music.” This year’s Australia Council Music Fellowship recipients are: Guitarist Karin Schaupp (Qld). Percussionist and artistic director Claire Edwardes (NSW). Producer, performer and composer Paul Mac (NSW). Singer, lyricist and composer Matthew Robinson (Vic). Karin Schaupp is an accomplished classical guitarist who has performed in Australia, Europe, Asia, the US, Mexico and Canada as a recitalist and concerto soloist. She has released six highly acclaimed solo CDs as well an album with Australian singer Katie Noonan. During her fellowship, she will work on a number of collaborative projects with highly regarded artists, including oud player Joseph Tawadros, recorder player Genevieve Lacey and again with Noonan. Claire Edwardes has been a driving force in percussion performance, both in Australia and internationally. She will use her fellowship to stage the premiere of a new children's show she has created based on two stories by Rudyard Kipling, with music written in collaboration with Sydney composer Drew Crawford. She will also travel to Berlin to work with composers Juan Felipe Waller and Simon Steen-Andersen on new works written especially for her. Paul Mac has a long and impressive track record, which includes writing scores for film, television and the theatre and his work with electronic music. He plans to undertake an ambitious work schedule during his fellowship, which includes producing works for Stereogamous and Ngaiire and collaborating with Daniel Johns from Silverchair. He will also write and produce a solo album and tour it in Berlin, score a film featuring the Bangarra Dance Theatre and create a major installation for Performance Space. Matthew Robinson is an award-winning composer and lyricist and has contributed to new musical theatre productions in Australia, Singapore, New York and London. The fellowship will support him to write and develop three new musical works – Atlantis; Happy People and As Night Descends. He will also spend time in New York to be mentored by leading composer and lyricist Stephen Schwartz. This year’s recipients were chosen by peers Deborah Conway (Vic), Johannes Luebbers (WA), Rosalind Page (NSW) and Holly Throsby (NSW). Past recipients include Erik Griswold, Lucas Abela, Gareth Liddiard, Simon Barker and Genevieve Lacey. The music assessment panel also assessed applications for project fellowships and skills and arts development grants. The successful applications are listed here: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/grant-decisions/reports/music/music-assessment-meeting-report-november-2013-don-banks-award,-fellowships,-project-fellowships-and-skills-and-arts-development   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2013-12-20 New arts leadership grants now available The Australia Council for the Arts is offering two significant new leadership development opportunities for arts professionals in Australia. Australia Council Director Arts Organisations Terese Casu said she was pleased to announce applications were now open for two new programs – the Artistic Leadership Grant and the Executive Leadership Grant. “The Australia Council is responding to the need for enhanced leadership training for arts leaders by establishing the Capacity Development Program to develop these skills through scholarships, partnerships with other organisations and mentoring,” Ms Casu said. “The Artistic Leadership and the Executive Leadership grants aim to enhance the careers of emerging and senior arts leaders and managers by supporting their professional development. “Applicants will be able to develop their own innovative national or international program to build leadership capacity, knowledge and global awareness.” The Artistic Leadership Grant provides up to $20,000 for individual applicants or group leaders to explore new approaches to artistic creation through technology, artform innovations and community engagement. Those who would benefit include artistic directors, creative producers, cultural leaders, choreographers, curators and highly regarded and influential emerging leaders who have the capacity to bring about change. The Executive Leadership Grant provides up to $20,000 for individual applicants to investigate new leadership structures and governance models and to increase the capabilities in their organisation. Applicants are encouraged to explore current leadership challenges and seek out opportunities which provide flexible and creative models to address future change within the sector. This includes topics such as governance, sustainable operating models and knowledge building. Applications for both programs close on Monday, 24 February and successful applicants will be advised in April. Ms Casu said these grants build on the recently created Arts Legacy Program and the successful Emerging Leaders Development Program. Applications for these grants have now closed and an announcement on those successful will be made in January. To apply for the Artistic Leadership Program, go to www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/Artistic-Leadership-Grants/ To apply for the Executive Leadership Program, go to www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/Executive-Leadership-Grants/ For more information on the Australia Council’s Capacity Development Program, contact Ricardo Peach at r.peach@australiacouncil.gov.au   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-08 Australian theatre receives $5.5m boost A national theatre festival, productions using digital technology and an innovative circus company are some of the artists and organisations to benefit from more than $5.5 million in funding from the Australia Council for the Arts. Australia Council Director Theatre Lyn Wallis said the grants would help playwrights, theatre companies and artists create new work, perform live and mentor emerging talent. “The Theatre Peer Assessment Panel has awarded its first allocation of the prestigious Creative Australia Emerging Presenter and New Digital Theatre grants, which provide between $150,000 to $250,000 over three years to create and present new work,” Ms Wallis said. “The theatre section of the Australia Council has long supported venue-based presenters to partner with independent artists, but there has been a concern about the lack of funding for artist-driven initiatives to develop their own programs. “The Emerging Presenter category was designed to support over three years artist-driven initiatives and collectives that develop their own seasons or programs of independent theatre and present it to the public.” Melbourne Live Art collective Field Theory and Crack Theatre Festival, held over the October long weekend in Newcastle, have been supported under this category. “Crack Theatre Festival’s program rated highly for its national focus and the opportunities presented for independent artists beyond NSW,” Ms Wallis said. “The panel was impressed by Field Theory’s application, which represented a group of talented and resourceful independent artists coming together to support each other through a program of site specific performances.” Ms Wallis said the New Digital Theatre category was established to support the sector engage with new creative technologies and digital platforms. “Applicants were required to present programs providing mentoring, producing support and strategic advice to independent emerging or established artists to create new theatre works that engage uniquely with digital platforms and connect with creative digital communities,” Ms Wallis said. Melbourne-based Arts House and the South Australian Country Arts Trust have been supported in this category. “The Arts House proposal featured a genuinely exciting and inventive program using mobile platforms that will leave a wonderful legacy for future artists,” Ms Wallis said. “The South Australian Country Arts Trust presented an outstanding program that will engage audiences in regional areas, including Whyalla, Mount Gambier and Port Pirie, using digital technology.” Other grant categories assessed were for Key Organisations and Program Presenter. “Five existing Key Organisations applied for three-year funding – Playwriting Australia (Redfern, NSW), Arena Theatre Company (Melbourne, Vic), Pact Theatre for Emerging Artists (Erskineville, NSW), Circa (Brisbane, Qld) and Just Us Theatre Ensemble (Cairns, Qld) - and all were funded,” Ms Wallis said. “The Program Presenter category has supported a diverse range of innovative theatre organisations and venues, including two from regional Australia – Merrigong Theatre Company (Wollongong, NSW) and Bathurst Memorial Entertainment Centre (Bathurst, NSW). “Vitalstatistix (Port Adelaide, SA) and Brisbane Community Arts Centre (Qld) have also been supported to develop and present contemporary work.” For more information on Australia Council theatre grants go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/artforms/theatre   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-08 Emerging & Experimental arts grants announced A robot opera, a game show and a curated exhibition of live art in a mine are some of the projects to benefit from $400,000 in funding from the Australia Council for the Arts. The Emerging and Experimental Arts Peer Assessment Panel has awarded the prestigious Creative Australia New Art grants - Creative Development, and Production and Presentation. The Emerging and Experimental Arts section established in May 2013 provides funding to artists exploring and experimenting with new forms and processes of making art, including hybrid arts and cross-disciplinary practice such as art/science. Australia Council Director Emerging and Experimental Arts Andrew Donovan said the Creative Australia grants would help artists from a wide range of disciplines create and present cutting edge new work to audiences. “The Creative Development grant enables artists to develop their concept over one year,” Mr Donovan said. “The Production and Presentation round supports previous recipients of the Creative Development grant to produce and present their new experimental art project to Australian audiences.” Eight artists have been funded in the Creative Development category, including Wade Marynowsky (Randwick, NSW) Kirsty Boyle (Tamworth, NSW), FKP (Cherrybrook, NSW), and Nancy Mauro-Flude (South Hobart, Tas). “Robots as art is the focus for two recipients, with Wade Marynowsky using his grant to develop prototypes for an outdoor opera featuring robots, sound and light and Kirsty Boyle will test ideas for an interactive robot performance installation,” Mr Donovan said. “FKP will work on an experimental curatorial art project set in a quarry in NSW, while Nancy Mauro-Flude will develop a large-scale multi-user 3D game using gaze interaction.” The other artists to receive grants in this category were: David Burraston (NSW), Oron Catts (WA), Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski (NSW) and William McClure (NSW). Two artists have been successful in the Promotion and Presentation category – Keith Armstrong (Bardon, Qld) and Tristan Meecham (Melbourne, Vic). “Keith Armstrong’s project is a series of dynamic installations and site-specific interventions controlled by environmental cycles, providing the audience with a unique sensory experience,” Mr Donovan said. “The work will be shown in regional and city centres around Australia, including Queensland Museum, Kickarts in Cairns, Melbourne Museum and Bundanon near Nowra, NSW. “Tristan Meecham’s innovative project focuses on the game show and will be an experiment in social engagement created through performance and participatory art. “It will explore materialism, games and reality TV and he will be giving away his own belongings as prizes. “It will be held during the Festival of Live Art, which has also received support from the Australia Council, in March this year, hosted by Arts House in Melbourne.” For more information on the Australia Council’s emerging and experimental arts grants go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/artforms/experimental-arts   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-14 Mike Nock to be honoured by Australia Council The Australia Council for the Arts has recognised the outstanding contribution of jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Mike Nock by awarding him the 2014 Don Banks Music Award. The Australia Council and members of the jazz and wider music community will pay tribute to Mr Nock at a ceremony prior to his gig at the Seymour Centre’s Sound Lounge on Saturday, 1 February. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said Mr Nock’s work as a musician, composer and mentor has had a huge impact on many musicians, both in Australia and internationally. “Mike Nock has had an enviable career and produced a remarkable body of work, which spans performing, recording and composing,” Mr Grybowski said. “As a respected and influential artistic leader, it is fitting that the Council recognises his significant contribution to Australian music with this award.” Council Director Music Paul Mason said during his long career Mr Nock had earned the respect and admiration of many of his peers, both here and overseas. “Mike has worked with some of the legends of the jazz world, most notably during his 25 years in the United States, including Coleman Hawkins, Yusef Lateef, Dionne Warwick and Sam Rivers,” Mr Mason said. “He has also produced an extensive catalogue of critically acclaimed, internationally released recordings. “His work in the 1970s with The Fourth Way established his international career and he has continued to tour extensively in Europe, Asia, the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. “As an orchestral composer he has been commissioned by groups such as the Cleveland Chamber Orchestra, the Dundedin Civic Orchestra, the UMO Jazz Orchestra in Finland and the Australian Chamber Orchestra. “He has been a dedicated mentor to young and emerging musicians through his teaching at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and by providing opportunities for them to play in his bands, including his current group the Mike Nock Project. “It is clear from the words of his peers that Mike has inspired a generation of musicians through his commitment to the artform and his great musical integrity.” After the ceremony Mike and his band will perform a 60-minute suite, which he composed through a commission from the Sydney Improvised Music Association (SIMA), with support from the Australia Council. The gig is part of SIMA’s weekly jazz performance program at the Seymour Centre, which is being held to mark the organisations’ 30th year. The Australia Council Don Banks Music Award honours a distinguished artist who has made an outstanding and sustained contribution to music in Australia. It was established to honour Don Banks, an Australian composer, performer and the first Chair of the Music Board. Recipients must be over 50 years old and nominated for the award. Nominations must demonstrate their importance to the music industry. Past winners include Kev Carmody (2013), Jon Rose (2012) Belinda Webster (2011) and Warren Fahey (2010). ABOUT MIKE NOCK Born in New Zealand in 1940 and now living in Sydney, pianist/composer Mike Nock is one of the acknowledged masters of jazz in Australasia. His reputation rests partly on his imposing international experience which includes: Twenty five years working in the USA with many of the world’s top jazz musicians such as Coleman Hawkins, Yusef Lateef, Dionne Warwick and Michael Brecker. A large catalogue of critically acclaimed, internationally released recordings. Leader of the 1970s seminal jazz-rock group The Fourth Way. A substantial body of original compositions in print and on recordings. Mike Nock returned to Australia from the US in 1985 after establishing an international reputation through his many tours and large catalogue of recordings. In 1983 he hosted his own TV series “Nock On Jazz” and in 1993 was the subject of a TVNZ documentary widely shown in Australasia. From 1996 to 2001 he was music director for Naxos/Jazz. In 1999 he was the recipient of a two-year Australian Arts Council Fellowship and in 2009 he was inducted into the Australian Jazz Hall of Fame. In 2003 he was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit ONZM and his biography Serious Fun – the Life and Music of Mike Nock was published in 2010 (Norman Meehan-Victoria University Press). ABOUT DON BANKS Don Banks was born in 1923 in Melbourne. The son of a jazz musician, he began studying the piano and musical theory at the age of five. Early in his career he earned his living as a jazz pianist and trombonist with bands such as that of Roger and Graeme Bell, where he gained valuable experience as an arranger and orchestrator. In the 1950s he worked in London as a professional orchestrator and from 1956 he composed commercial music for feature films, documentaries, animated films, television, advertisements, record libraries and theatre. He wrote some of the scores for the Hammer horror films, including Hysteria, The Reptiles and Rasputin,The Mad Monk. He was chairman of the Society for the Promotion of New Music in 1967-68 and after being appointed music director at the University of London Goldsmiths' College in 1969, Banks initiated new courses in conducting, guitar, folk music and jazz, and developed an Electronic Music Studio. Don Banks returned to Australia in 1972 to take up a Fellowship in Creative Arts in Canberra where he gave lectures, attended and directed seminars and adjudicated. He was also invited by the Prime Minister to chair the Music Board of the Australian Council for the Arts. In 1973 he became Head of Composition and Electronic Music Studies at the Canberra School of Music, where he established the Canberra School of Music's Electronic Music Centre, which under his guidance became the most advanced studio complex in the southern hemisphere. In 1977 Banks was appointed Guest Composer at the NSW State Conservatorium of Music, and in 1978 became its Head of the School of Composition Studies. In 1980 he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for services to music and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Melbourne. Don Banks died of cancer in September, 1980. His musical estate, consisting of papers, correspondence, manuscripts of most all his works, scores, tapes, discs and books, is preserved in the National Library of Australia in Canberra. The instruments from his electronic studio are preserved in the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-20 Information sessions for artists with disability The Australia Council for the Arts will hold information sessions across the country from this month about its new funding program for artists with disability. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the new funding program had been developed after extensive consultation with the sector, including Arts Access Australia, and was launched along with other initiatives to mark the International Day of People with Disability on 3 December. “The Australia Council has been reviewing its funding programs in response to the Australia Council Review, our new legislation and significant sector consultation over the past two years,” Mr Grybowski said. “It was timely we re-examined support for artists with disability and I’m delighted we were able to allocate $300,000 to support the new Artists with Disability Program, enabling more Australian artists with disability to create, develop, present, produce, exhibit and tour their work. “This will run as a pilot program in the first half of this year and will then be reviewed.” Individuals and groups who identify as having disability, including deaf artists, can apply for grants of up to $10,000 for development and up to $20,000 for arts projects. Applications close 3 March and program guidelines are available on the Australia Council’s website. Information sessions will be held in partnership with state and territory arts agencies and the peak arts and disability bodies at the following locations: State Cinema, North Hobart on Friday 24 January from 5.30pm to 6.45pm. Access Arts, New Farm, Brisbane on Monday, 3 February from 2pm to 4pm. Arts Access Victoria, Melbourne on Wednesday, 5 February from 2pm to 4pm. Department of Culture and the Arts, Perth on Friday, 7 February from 4.30pm to 6pm. Adelaide City Library on Tuesday, 11 February from 3pm to 5.30pm. The Australia Council, Sydney on Friday, 14 February from 2pm to 3.30pm. Canberra on Wednesday, 19 February from 12.30 to 1.30pm. Arts NT, Darwin on Friday, 21 February from 9am to 10.30am. Penrith Library on Friday, 21 February from 10am to noon. Bookings are essential. To book and for more information on these sessions go to: www.australiacouncil.gov.au/disability An online Q & A session will also be held on Friday, 24 January from 4pm to 5pm via Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/191605741035734/ Other initiatives to be implemented include an accessible application process across all future Australia Council funding programs and the ability to submit applications in a range of formats. The Council’s Disability Action Plan for 2014-2016 has been finalised and was published in December. It features a number of strategies that will be embedded across the organisation over the next three years and demonstrates the Council’s commitment to this area. The new plan focuses on leadership, accessibility and arts practice and builds on the Australia Council’s previous work in the area of disability. Highlights include developing a disability employment strategy, a leadership program for artists and arts workers with disability and a focus on including more peers with disability on assessment panels.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB),DOC (65 KB) or HTML(38.5 KB).     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-22 Australian artists for IETM meeting announced Fifty national artists, producers and presenters have been selected by the Australia Council for the Arts to participate in the inaugural IETM Satellite meeting to be held in Melbourne in May. They will join arts leaders from Europe and Asia who will travel to Australia for the knowledge and cultural exchange event to increase international collaboration and engagement. The Australia Council for the Arts and the International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) will present the three-day meeting in partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne (Asian Performing Arts Program) and Next Wave from Monday 12 May to Wednesday 14 May 2014. It will be held at Arts Centre Melbourne. Australia Council Acting Executive Director Arts Development Collette Brennan said the IETM Satellite meeting would bring together the most prestigious and innovative performing arts producers and presenters from Europe, Asia and Australia. “IETM is the largest and oldest European network for the performing arts with more than 500 members from 50 countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan and Australia,” Ms Brennan said. “In the past decade IETM has sought to broaden its membership outside Europe and a number of the biannual meetings have been held in Asia, including Singapore, China and Japan. “A meeting in Australia has been discussed for a number of years, and this event will build on the existing partnerships and artistic opportunities already established in the region.” Ms Brennan said about 100 Australian artists and arts companies applied to participate in the event and the 50 chosen had demonstrated extensive experience in collaboration projects in Europe and Asia. “The successful applicants are drawn from regional and city centres and represent a broad range of artforms and events, including dance, theatre, visual art, puppetry and arts festivals,” Ms Brennan said. “They include Campbelltown Arts Centre (NSW), Australian Dance Theatre (SA), Chamber Made Opera (Vic), Terrapin Puppet Theatre (Tas), Brisbane Powerhouse (Qld), Boho (ACT) and Darwin Festival (NT). “These arts organisations will have unique access to influential and dynamic European and Asian arts leaders to share expertise, build partnerships and create strong networks to facilitate the development of future projects. “They will also have the opportunity to showcase the diverse talent and professionalism we are renowned for.” The IETM Satellite meeting coincides with the Next Wave Festival and delegates will participate in its events held on Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 May. The festival will present a range of new work from innovative Australian and international performing and visual artists, including theatre, dance, media and installation art. “Delegates will enjoy a curated weekend of activities that have been programmed for this year’s festival and meet some of the artists and producers involved,” Ms Brennan said. “The IETM Satellite meeting will start on the Monday and delegates can look forward to interesting presentations and speakers from some of the world’s leading performing arts companies, workshops with industry peers and making new contacts within the sector.” The final program and participants from Europe and Asia will be announced in the coming months.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-01-31 Creating art with Asia through partnership grants The Australia Council for the Arts is offering Australian artists the opportunity to create and present new work with other arts professionals in Asia. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the Creative Partnerships with Asia Program, now in its second year, is an important part of the Council’s strategy to build creative partnerships and increase artistic collaborations with Asia. “The program is designed to facilitate creative exchanges and collaborations between Australian and Asian artists in all artforms, including emerging and experimental arts,” Mr Grybowski said. “Grants of up to $40,000 will enable new work to be created and presented to audiences in both regions and support long-term networks.” Eligible projects must achieve at least two objectives – deliver workshops that enable artistic exchange and develop networks in both countries; presentation in both countries of final development showings or a program of open studio visits with curators or potential presenting partners; or showing completed work in both countries. A presentation can be a publication of new writing, a season of live performance, a visual art exhibition or the release of recordings. It is not for supporting works in repertoire or touring existing works. A number of dynamic partnerships were developed in the first year of the program. Once such project was the innovative collaboration between Melbourne composers and visual arts group Slave Pianos and Indonesian multi-disciplinary art collective Punkasila. The artists produced The Lepidopters, a science fiction space opera about alien moths that invade the Indonesian archipelago to colonise Earth through inter-species reproduction. It is based on a comic book, written by science fiction writer Mark von Schlegell and illustrated by Punkasila bassist Iwank, with music composed by Slave Pianos and Punkasila. The piece was performed for the first time at MONA MOFO earlier this month by Punkasila band members, along with concert pianist Michael Kieran Harvey and Indonesian singer Rachel Sarawati. The performance included animated projections on a screen behind them. Slave Pianos member Neil Kelly said the collaboration came about after fellow group member Danius Kesminas undertook a three-month Asialink residency in Yogyakarta and formed Punkasila with the Indonesians. “We’ve had a relationship with Punkasila for a few years, but I doubt this project would have happened without the Creative Asia grant,” Mr Kelly said. The Lepidopters was their first project together, but Mr Kelly is confident the collaborations will be ongoing. “It’s been incredibly fruitful – we’ve had new challenges, like attempting to integrate different tuning systems, and we’ve developed fantastic friendships. They’re very hard working artists,” Mr Kelly said. “Any collaboration with artists across borders is a really brilliant idea, particularly given our close relationship with Indonesia.” The Lepidopters will be performed in Indonesia in March and again in Australia with the Astra Choir at Arts House, Melbourne on 12 and 13 April. Applications for the Creative Partnership with Asia Program close on 10 March 2014. For more information go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/creative-partnerships-with-asia-initiative   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-03 Don Banks Award winner “missionary for jazz” The Australia Council for the Arts has paid tribute to jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Mike Nock at a celebration with his peers in Sydney on Saturday. Mr Nock was presented with The Australia Council’s Don Banks Award at a ceremony prior to his gig at the Seymour Centre’s Sound Lounge. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said Mr Nock had been a popular choice for the award. “Mike Nock continues to influence his peers, delight audiences and inspire the next generation of jazz musicians,” Mr Grybowski said. “The Council was delighted to recognise Mike’s extraordinary body of work as a performer, composer, creative collaborator, mentor and ambassador for jazz in Australasia. He is truly a luminary in his field.” Respected bass player Jonathan Zwartz nominated Mr Nock due to his impact on the Australian Jazz scene. “Mike has had enormous success internationally, as a composer and a pianist, having recorded on the most prestigious jazz labels with some of the greatest names in the history of the jazz genre,” Mr Zwartz said. “He is a gifted collaborator, working with artists of different artistic disciplines as well as branching out into the classical music sphere. “Mike has been a persistent mentor, encouraging younger musicians by having them play in his ensembles and providing recording and concert opportunities. There is no one more suitable for this award than Mike Nock.” Mr Nock said it was humbling to receive the award, which had energised him and boosted his confidence. “But it also brings with it a sense of responsibility to the music community. They’ve shown they have faith in me and I have to step up to the plate,” Mr Nock said. Mr Nock said jazz often gets overlooked and he described himself as a “missionary for jazz.” “The music really deserves to be heard so people can make up their own minds,” Mr Nock said. Mr Nock was reluctant to choose a career highlight, saying there had been so many. “This award is one of a list of highlights, but it’s all been great. I’m glad I’m still able to do all this stuff at my age and still be as keen as I ever was,” Mr Nock said. For Mr Nock, there is still so much to do. He has been in discussions about recording a CD, regularly receives commissions for new work and continues to play with his various bands. “The music gives me energy. It’s a means of connecting with people,” Mr Nock said. Many members of his bands have been his students and he said it was important to give back. “It goes along with the idea of being connected and sharing what you know,” Mr Nock said. After the award ceremony Mike and his band performed a 60-minute suite, which he composed through a commission from the Sydney Improvised Music Association (SIMA), with support from the Australia Council. It was written to mark SIMA’s 30th anniversary and Mr Nock said it reflected the journey he and SIMA had shared. He first performed the piece last year but last week he was still tinkering with it. “Things are never finished - we’ve got to keep looking at things.” ABOUT MIKE NOCK Born in New Zealand in 1940 and now living in Sydney, pianist/composer Mike Nock is one of the acknowledged masters of jazz in Australasia. His reputation rests partly on his imposing international experience which includes: Twenty five years working in the USA with many of the world’s top jazz musicians such as Coleman Hawkins, Yusef Lateef, Dionne Warwick and Michael Brecker. A large catalogue of critically acclaimed, internationally released recordings. Leader of the 1970s seminal jazz-rock group The Fourth Way. A substantial body of original compositions in print and on recordings.   Mike Nock returned to Australia from the US in 1985 after establishing an international reputation through his many tours and large catalogue of recordings. In 1983 he hosted his own TV series “Nock On Jazz” and in 1993 was the subject of a TVNZ documentary widely shown in Australasia. From 1996 to 2001 he was music director for Naxos/Jazz. In 1999 he was the recipient of a two-year Australian Arts Council Fellowship and in 2009 he was inducted into the Australian Jazz Hall of Fame. In 2003 he was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit ONZM and his biography Serious Fun – the Life and Music of Mike Nock was published in 2010 (Norman Meehan-Victoria University Press). Website: http://www.mikenock.com/ ABOUT THE DON BANKS AWARD The Australia Council Don Banks Music Award honours a distinguished artist who has made an outstanding and sustained contribution to music in Australia. It was established to honour Don Banks, an Australian composer, performer and the first Chair of the Music Board. Recipients must be over 50 years old and nominated for the award. Nominations must demonstrate their importance to the music industry. Past winners include Kev Carmody (2013), Jon Rose (2012) Belinda Webster (2011) and Warren Fahey (2010).   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-05 Nashville songwriters residency now open The Australia Council for the Arts is offering Australian songwriters an opportunity to live in Nashville and immerse themselves in the local music scene for three months. Australia Council Director Music Paul Mason said the Nashville Songwriter Residency, now in its second year, would include mentoring by one of Australia’s most successful producers. “Nashville has always had a reputation as being a major music town and its commitment to songwriting goes beyond any specific style,” Mr Mason said. “This residency is open to all songwriters. The Australia Council awarded the residency last year to Chris Altmann and Travis Caudle.” Mr Mason said the residency would enable songwriters to develop their writing skills, build creative and business networks and connect with other artists to co-write and collaborate. Australian producer and Nashville resident Mark Moffatt facilitates the program. Mr Moffatt said Nashville had seen enormous growth even in the past 12 months and continued to stretch musical boundaries. “The city should be firmly on the Australian industry’s horizon and the Australia Council is playing an important role in ensuring that by providing opportunities for writers that would not be there otherwise,” Mr Moffatt said. Last year’s recipient, Travis Caudle, said the residency allowed him to make valuable connections and record his latest release It’s Just You. “Most people think they have to go to LA or New York, but all the infrastructure is in Nashville and to be able to soak up a city known as music city as well as the opportunity to work with Mark Moffatt was a great experience,” Travis said. “He really helped out with contacts and getting to know Nashville and who I should approach.” Travis said recording his new release was the highlight. “Mark put together some amazing musicians to record with me, including guys who had worked with people such as Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson, and he played on three songs,” Travis said. “They would have one listen to my song and then they would play it like they had played it for 10 years. “It was an amazing way to work.” Travis found his Nashville experience so beneficial he extended his stay by nearly three months and is planning a return visit this year to capitalise on the contacts he made and record the songs he wrote during his residency. Travis has some advice for those applying for the residency: “Definitely do it if you want to immerse yourself in the music industry in America, but pick what you want to achieve in those three months.” The Nashville Songwriter Residency provides up to $15,000 to cover transport, accommodation and living costs. Applications close on 17 February. For more information go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/nashville-songwriter-residency-17-february-2014   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-13 Australia Council funds national tour of Lake Independent dance artist Lisa Wilson will present her critically acclaimed production of Lake at this month’s Australian Performing Arts Market (APAM) in Brisbane. Lake is one of several Australian dance works to be featured at APAM, which runs from 18 to 22 February. Lake will then tour nationally from March to May, presented by Performing Lines. Supported by the Australia Council, Performing Lines develops, produces and tours new and innovative Australian performing arts regionally, nationally and internationally. The tour has been funded by the Australia Council’s Playing Australia grant, which assists tours of professionally produced performing arts to regional and remote communities across Australia. Within this tour there will be a performance and masterclasses at the 2014 Australian Youth Dance Festival. The week-long event in South Australia will draw together professional dance artists and youth dancers. Australia Council Director Dance Carin Mistry said Ms Wilson had also received a Projects – Creative Development grant late last year to develop Wireless, a new inter-media dance theatre work about trust, technology and deception. “Lisa has been producing innovative and cutting-edge dance works for many years and she was nominated for a 2013 Australian Dance Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Dance,” Ms Mistry said. “During her 20-year international career Lisa has worked as a director, choreographer, performer and educator. She has produced work in a range of artforms, including theatre, opera, large-scale installation works and multi-media performances and for company commissions and full-length independent work. “Lisa was awarded the Hephzibar Tintner Choreographic Fellowship in 2011, which enabled her to work with the Australian Ballet, Sydney Dance Company and Opera Australia. Her success is particularly noteworthy, as she is a freelance artist.” Ms Mistry said Lisa was working with composer Paul Charlier on Wireless, which would be a layering of dance, music, design and on-stage technology. The work is being developed with the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts through the Fresh Ground Residency program, which provides a venue for rehearsals and performances, as well as assistance to develop touring strategies. “The Australia Council’s Dance Peer Assessment Panel has recognised Lisa is building momentum in her work and has assembled a strong creative team for the project, which is why she received the grant.” The Dance Peer Assessment Panel funded 29 applications worth $1.1 million at its October meeting in the categories Artform Development; Creative Australia: New Work; Projects – Creative Development; and Projects Presentation. Narelle Benjamin was awarded the Dance Fellowship. APAM is the premier biennial industry event for contemporary performing arts in the Asia Pacific region. Attracting more than 600 artists, presenters and producers from around the globe, it showcases the best creative works from Australia and New Zealand. It enables new collaborations, networking with fellow professionals, and the opportunity to meet key arts funding and development agencies to build and negotiate international and national tours. APAM 2014 is presented by the Australia Council for the Arts in partnership with Brisbane Powerhouse. Brisbane City Council is the principal supporter of APAM and the Queensland Government, through Arts Queensland and Tourism and Events Queensland, proudly supports the event.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-13 Vale James Waites It is with great sadness that the Australia Council acknowledges the passing of theatre journalist and writer James Waites.  He will be remembered by the theatre community as a deeply compassionate individual who was a good friend and mentor to many artists.  The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to James’ family and friends. Read more about James’ life and his career here: http://augustasupple.com/   2014-02-14 Frank Panucci appointed to Australia Council The Australia Council for the Arts Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski has announced Frank Panucci has been appointed to the Australia Council Executive Team. Mr Grybowski said he was delighted to welcome Mr Panucci to the Executive Team. “Frank will hold the Executive Director Arts Funding role while the organisation undertakes strategic planning and a review of our grants program,” Mr Grybowski said. “This work responds to a significant period of review and consultation, the outcome of which will redefine the strategic direction of the Council.” Frank brings to the Council more than 20 years experience in community and cultural development. He has held senior positions in the government, community and arts sectors and helped establish Sydney’s first Italo-Australian community cultural development performance company FILEF Theatre in 1983. He was principal policy officer at the then NSW Ethnic Affairs Commission and managed the Race Discrimination Unit at the Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission. Frank has worked at the Australia Council on a number of occasions over the past 14 years, holding managerial positions in Multicultural Arts Policy, Community and Cultural Development, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts and as Director of Policy, Communications and Research. His most recent role was Director of Community Partnerships.   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-20 New mentor program for arts philanthropists The Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Partnerships Australia have partnered on a new program to build leadership in arts philanthropy. The Philanthropic Mentoring Program will provide up to 10 mentoring opportunities for Australian philanthropy managers or executives in the not-for-profit arts sector whose key role is to fundraise for their arts organisation. Those selected will be matched with a mentor who will develop their skills to increase revenue through philanthropy. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said he was delighted Creative Partnerships Australia had agreed to jointly support the program. “Since 2005 the Council has offered a philanthropic mentoring program, through McCarthy Mentoring, to Major Performing Arts companies to help increase private support of the arts,” Mr Grybowski said. “Creative Partnership Australia’s support enables us to extend the program to all arts organisations that employ a philanthropy manager and have an annual operating turnover of more than $2 million. “Philanthropy and sponsorship of the arts continues to grow, and our research shows private sector income to our Major Performing Arts companies has increased from $31 million in 2004 to $68 million in 2013, which is about a 120 per cent increase.” Creative Partnerships Australia Chief Executive Officer Fiona Menzies said that delivering such programs was important to facilitating private sector investment in the arts. “Creative Partnerships Australia’s core mandate is to facilitate sustainability in the arts and creative sectors, and this new mentoring program will deliver on this by building leadership in arts philanthropy throughout Australia,” Ms Menzies said. “This is our first program to be delivered with the Australia Council and I look forward to working more closely with them in the future in order to extend the reach of capacity building initiatives across all artforms throughout the nation.” This program offers a unique opportunity to work one on one with an experienced executive. The mentors will draw on their experience in business, not-for-profits and as company directors to provide strategic advice and practical insights on business development, partnerships and philanthropy. Mentors will help participants build their confidence, increase their networks, boost their skills and provide the necessary inspiration and motivation to be successful in this field. McCarthy Mentoring will work closely with the participants, their organisations and board to develop key goals for their philanthropic program and ensure their mentor is able to help achieve them. The program is open to organisations in all artforms and runs for 12 months. All applicants must have significant support from their organisation, including confirmation from their executive and chair confirming their commitment to the program. Applications close on 24 March. To apply go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/Philanthropy-Mentor-Program   Formats This media release can also be viewed in an emdedded frame below (we recommend using the 'view in fullscreen' viewing option), on the Australia Council's Scribd account or downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)     Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-27 Fiona Foley & Julie Ewington recognised The Australia Council for the Arts has recognised the outstanding contributions made by visual artist Fiona Foley and curator Julie Ewington by awarding them the 2013 Visual Arts Awards. The Australia Council and members of the visual arts community will celebrate the achievements of both women at a ceremony at the Brisbane Powerhouse on Wednesday, 26 March. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said he was pleased the Council could recognise the significant work of Queensland artist Fiona Foley and Queensland curator, writer and broadcaster Julie Ewington. “Both women have made substantial contributions to the visual arts sector for many years and have inspired other artists and arts professionals both here and overseas, which makes them deserving recipients of this award,” Mr Grybowski said. Australia Council Visual Arts Sector Strategy Panel Chair Doctor Danie Mellor said the assessment panel was excited to select Fiona and Julie as the 2013 recipients. “Both women have each contributed so much over the course of their careers: Fiona’s work is both thought-provoking and confronting and she is a well-regarded speaker, writer and curator. Julie has curated so many important exhibitions, including Contemporary Australia: Women in 2012 at QAGOMA and has written and spoken extensively on Australian and Asian art over a number of years,” Dr Mellor said. “Fiona’s paintings, installations and photographs explore questions of history, identity and personal signification. “Her work examines issues of Indigenous identity on a regional, national and international level and challenges historical stereotypes and encourages debate between artists and communities in Australia and overseas. “Her work examines issues of Indigenous identity on a regiona“She was one of several Indigenous artists to be invited to exhibit at the Royal Academy of Art’s Australia show last year and her knowledge and advocacy of Indigenous issues saw her give the key note address at last year’s Origins Festival of First Nations conference in London., national and international level and challenges historical stereotypes and encourages debate between artists and communities in Australia and overseas. “Her works have been acquired by institutions all over the world, including the Art Gallery of NSW, the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, the British Museum, London and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia, USA. “Fiona has always been a champion of Indigenous art, and in 1987 she co-founded the Boomali Aboriginal Artists Co-operative in Sydney when she was in her early 20s, along with many other early career artists who have since gone on to play important roles in the arts.” Dr Mellor said Julie Ewington was a respected curator and had become a specialist in contemporary Australian and Southeast Asian art during a career that has spanned almost 40 years. “Julie has played an important role in turning the Queensland Art Gallery into the leading Australian gallery it is today, attracting some of the world’s most prestigious exhibitions and influential artists,” Dr Mellor said. “In addition to holding the significant positions of curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney and the Canberra School of Art Gallery, she also shares her considerable knowledge with artists, having taught art history at several Australian universities. She was also the Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the Australian National University from 1999 to 2000.” As part of the awards the Australia Council commissions an artist to create commemorative brooches for each recipient, this year designed by Sydney jeweller and artist Emma Fielden. The Visual Arts Awards acknowledge and honour the exceptional achievements of an Australian artist and an arts professional who have made an outstanding contribution to the development of Australian art. Past winners include Tracey Moffatt and Juliana Enberg in 2012 and Fiona Hall and Ron Radford in 2011. ABOUT FIONA FOLEY Fiona Foley was born in Maryborough, Queensland in 1964. She completed a Certificate of Arts at the East Sydney Technical College in 1983, during which she was a visiting student to St Martins School of Art, London. From 1984 to 1986 she undertook a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Sydney College of the Arts, and in 1987 she completed a Diploma of Education at the Sydney Institute of Education, Sydney University. Throughout her career Fiona has taken an active role promoting Indigenous identity and was co-founder of the Boomali Aboriginal Artists Co-operative, Sydney in 1987. In 2003, she was appointed Adjunct Professor at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University. In 2004, Foley completed an International Studio and Curatorial Program residency in New York, and has since also been resident artist at the University of Wollongong (2006), Sydney College of the Arts (2006) and Redgate Gallery, Beijing (2010). In 2010, Foley created a new body of work for the 17th Biennale of Sydney. Foley continues to work on projects, including sculptural commissions and installations, in Australia and overseas. "It's about putting Indigenous people up front in the world, in every way - in fashion, in exhibitions, and in the gallery system." Fiona Foley. ABOUT JULIE EWINGTON Julie Ewington is a writer, curator and broadcaster. She has worked at the Queensland Art Gallery since 1997 and in 2008 she was appointed its Head of Australian Art. She specialises in contemporary Australian art across all media and contemporary art from Southeast Asia. Julie has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the Canberra School of Art Gallery. For many years she taught art history in Australian universities and in 1999-2000 was Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, Australian National University. ABOUT EMMA FIELDEN Emma Fielden is a Sydney based jeweller and artist whose drawing practice closely informs her jewellery pieces. She uses hand engraving techniques to create works made of repetitively built up form, intricate surface patterns and line-work, mostly using silver and gold. Emma has exhibited her work regularly since 2006 in Australia and abroad, was a finalist in the 2012 National Contemporary Jewellery Award and winner of the prestigious Buda Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Award in 2009. She is a recipient of an Australia Council New Work Grant and with that support is currently preparing for a solo exhibition to be held in November this year. “Through a language of line and mark making, I make works that are guided by a meditative and repetitive process. I see a finished work as an artefact of that process.” Emma Fielden   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-02-27 Digital writing residency goes to Robot Uni The first digital writing residency funded by the Australia Council for the Arts will launch tonight at the Queensland University of Technology with a project that challenges our perception about robots and entertainment. It’s proved so successful, the Council is opening applications for a new project. At Robot University, the public can use touchscreens to interact with three machines, all with their own personalities, histories and occupations. Creator Christy Dena, now an Adjunct Professor with QUT’s Creative Industries Faculty, hopes that the more a person interacts with the trio of robots the more empathy they will feel for them. “Here in Australia, our culture is heavily influenced by Hollywood and we’ve generally come to see robots as killing machines rather than companions,” Prof Dena said. “But the reality is that robots will play an increasingly visible role in our everyday lives into the future and we need to be mentally prepared to accept them into our homes and workplaces. “Robot University is designed to help progress the national conversation about how we treat these machines – do we want to be known in the annals of history as champions for the ethical treatment of robots or as cold masters to a race of robot slaves?” Robot University is now on public display at The Cube, QUT’s international award-winning digital interactive learning and display space. The project is a unique digital writing feat, and one of the most complex ever undertaken in Australia. Built using the game engine Unity, Professor Dena spent six months developing Robot University with her technical team, Adam Single (programming), Jacek Tuschewski (sound designing), Paul Stapelberg (3D modelling, animation), Simon Boxer (concept and environmental art) and Oscar Guillen (interface art). Professor Dena said the game-like environment for digital storytelling is something Australian families will see and experience more of in the coming years. “This is a great example of the next-generation entertainment we can expect,” Prof Dena said. “Robot University offers people a mix of interactive digital characters that appeal to both children and adults, which provides an enriched experience. “During play testing, I was really impressed by how willing parents were to pick their kids up and ‘play’ with the robots together – it’s an environment that really promotes a shared experience, and that can easily lead to further discussions at home about the key issues raised in Robot University.” The Australia Council for the Arts will tonight launch another digital writing residency using the advanced technology of The cube, only the second the organisation has funded. Australia Council Director Literature Jill Eddington said the Council was pleased to partner with QUT for a second year on this exciting initiative and announce the opening of applications. “The literature panel was keen to support this project for another year because it puts writers and the narrative at the heart of this innovative use of technology and digital display,” Ms Eddington said. “The Cube presents a unique opportunity for the writer in residence to interact not only with the technological potential of the space but also to collaborate with QUT researchers and students. It provides a rare opportunity for engaging audiences of all ages with a combination of literature, science, mathematics and engineering. “Christy Dena provided a fascinating interactive narrative on our attitudes towards artificial intelligence with her Robot University project. It has resulted not only in the creation of a wonderful new work, but it has also provided a deeper understanding of the potential of digital platforms for writers to connect with audiences.” Digital storytellers have until 3 April to lodge their applications. To apply go to: www.thecube.qut.edu.au/slither/sliver-2014-ozco-dwr-2014-australia-council-arts-digital-writing-residency-opportunity-call QUT acknowledges the support of our Cube Partners Ausenco, ALS Limited, SGI and AMX.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-03-11 Vale Wendy Hughes The Australia Council acknowledges the passing of Australian film, television and stage actor Wendy Hughes. Ms Hughes was one of Australia’s most recognised and respected performers, with a memorable career spanning more than four decades. The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to her family and friends. For more on the life and work of Wendy Hughes, click here. 2014-03-14 PPCA & Australia Council announce recording grant results The PPCA and Australia Council today announced the recipients of five grants offered under an innovative partnership between the two organisations. Through the partnership, launched in October 2013, five one-off grants of $15,000 were offered to assist Australian artists create new sound recordings. PPCA is extremely pleased to be able to add these recording grants to the already long-list of artist initiatives that PPCA currently supports, which help Australian recording artists to have successful careers. PPCA was also delighted to be able to partner with the Australia Council, drawing on the Council’s extensive expertise managing peer assessed grant programs for the arts sector. Minister for the Arts Senator the Hon George Brandis QC welcomed the partnership between the PPCA and the Australia Council. “Millions of Australians enjoy listening to music created by local artists and are proud of the international success of our musicians,” Senator Brandis said. “The five grants awarded today will help Australian musicians to create and record music that will add to the depth and strength of Australia’s diverse music culture.” “We were extremely pleased by the range and number of applicants under the program and on behalf of PPCA I would like to congratulate all of the artists who were successful in securing grant funding. We look forward to hearing the recordings that emerge as a result of this funding and wish all of the recipients the very best over the course of their recording careers. I would like to thank the Australia Council for their ongoing assistance and look forward to our continuing partnership.” Dan Rosen, CEO PPCA “The Australia Council is pleased to be working with a key industry partner like the PPCA and this initiative captures our shared ambition to support outstanding artists realise their creative work” said Mr Tony Grybowski, Australia Council Chief Executive Officer. “The response to the initiative was incredibly strong and a great indication of the quality and ambition of our recording artists.” After a rigorous application process, recipients of the first PPCA Australia Council grants have been chosen across a range of genres from soul and roots to classical and contemporary singer-songwriters: Courtney Barnett will record her debut full length album with her live band (Dave Mudie, Andrew 'Bones' Sloane) and co-producers Dan Luscombe and Burke Reid. The Grigoryan Brothers to record a new album featuring their own compositions and Australian composers Nigel Westlake, Shaun Rigney and Stuart Greenbaum Lance Ferguson (from The Bamboos) to record a new Lanu album featuring collaborators Megan Washington, steel guitarist Bill Savesi, the Melbourne Samoan Choir and more. Ben Salter to record his second solo album at Applewood Lane Studios Ainslie Wills to record her second album “Oh the Gold’ PPCA and the Australia Council are now considering further plans for the program – stay tuned for updates. PPCA represents thousands of Australian recording artists when their music is used in public. In 2013 PPCA distributed over $33 million to its registered artists and record labels. Registration for Australian artists is free. Go to www.ppca.com.au for further information. For more information contact: Luke Woods, PPCA Communications Manager – (02) 8569 1165 Karen Smith, Australia Council Media Manager – (02) 9215 9030   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-03-25 Fiona Foley & Julie Ewington recognised tonight The Australia Council for the Arts will tonight recognise the outstanding contributions of visual artist Professor Fiona Foley and curator Julie Ewington by presenting them with the 2013 Visual Arts Awards at the Brisbane Powerhouse. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski and members of the visual arts community will celebrate the achievements of both women at the ceremony and artist Richard Bell will be the master of ceremonies. Mr Grybowski said both Queensland artist Professor Fiona Foley and Queensland curator, writer and broadcaster Julie Ewington had made substantial contributions to the visual arts sector for many years and inspired other artists and arts professionals in Australia and overseas. “It is important that we acknowledge the pioneering work of artists and arts professionals like Fiona and Julie, who make Australian visual arts such a vibrant and stimulating artform,” Mr Grybowski said. Recipients of the Visual Arts Awards are nominated by their peers. One of Fiona’s nominators was Queensland artist Victoria Reichelt and Julie’s nominators included South Australian artist Catherine Truman. Ms Reichelt said Fiona was a leading Queensland artist with numerous professional achievements, both nationally and internationally. “She is also a fearless advocate for Indigenous political and social equality,” Ms Reichelt said. Ms Truman said Julie was an eminent writer, curator and broadcaster and a passionate champion of contemporary art and arts practice in Australia. “Over many years she has enthusiastically encouraged generations of emerging, mid-career and established artists, directly engaging in the complexities of individual practices and communicating her extraordinary depth of understanding to a wider national and international audience,” Ms Truman said. Professor Foley noted the first Visual Arts Award was given in 1987 and since then four recipients had been Aboriginal, with the first Aboriginal artist, Paddy Lilipiyana, winning in 1992. “I am honoured to be in such esteemed company, such as Tracey Moffatt, Fiona Hall, Inge King and many more,” Professor Foley said. “This is great recognition for the work I have done to date.” Ms Ewington said she was taken completely by surprise when she opened the letter announcing she had won the award. “This award is especially wonderful because it is coming from my peers,” Ms Ewington said. “It will sustain and encourage me for my future work.” As part of the awards the Australia Council commissions an artist to create commemorative brooches for each recipient, this year designed by Sydney jeweller and artist Emma Fielden. The Visual Arts Awards acknowledge and honour the exceptional achievements of an Australian artist and an arts professional who have made an outstanding contribution to the development of Australian art. Past winners include Tracey Moffatt and Juliana Enberg in 2012 and Fiona Hall and Ron Radford in 2011. ABOUT FIONA FOLEY Fiona Foley was born in Maryborough, Queensland in 1964. She completed a Certificate of Arts at the East Sydney Technical College in 1983, during which she was a visiting student to St Martins School of Art, London. From 1984 to 1986 she undertook a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Sydney College of the Arts, and in 1987 she completed a Diploma of Education at the Sydney Institute of Education, Sydney University. Throughout her career Fiona has taken an active role promoting Indigenous identity and was one of the co-founders of the Boomali Aboriginal Artists Co-operative, Sydney in 1987. From 2003 to 2009 she was Adjunct Professor at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University. In 2004, Foley completed an International Studio and Curatorial Program residency in New York, and has since also been resident artist at the University of Wollongong (2006), Sydney College of the Arts (2006) and Redgate Gallery, Beijing (2010). In 2010, Foley created a new body of work for the 17th Biennale of Sydney. In 2011 she was appointed Adjunct Professor at the University of Queensland and she continues to work on projects, including sculptural commissions and installations, in Australia and overseas. ABOUT JULIE EWINGTON Julie Ewington is a writer, curator and broadcaster. She has worked at the Queensland Art Gallery since 1997 and in 2008 she was appointed its Head of Australian Art. She specialises in contemporary Australian art across all media and contemporary art from Southeast Asia. Julie has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the Canberra School of Art Gallery. For many years she taught art history in Australian universities and in 1999-2000 was Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, Australian National University. ABOUT EMMA FIELDEN Emma Fielden is a Sydney based jeweller and artist whose drawing practice closely informs her jewellery pieces. She uses hand engraving techniques to create works made of repetitively built up form, intricate surface patterns and line-work, mostly using silver and gold. Emma has exhibited her work regularly since 2006 in Australia and abroad, was a finalist in the 2012 National Contemporary Jewellery Award and winner of the prestigious Buda Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Award in 2009. She is a recipient of an Australia Council New Work Grant and will use that support to prepare for a solo exhibition in November this year. ABOUT RICHARD BELL Richard Bell was born in the Queensland town of Charleville and is a member of the Kamilaroi, Kooma, Jiman and Gurang Gurang communities. A previous winner of the National Telstra Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, he is a nationally recognised artist represented in major collections in Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Richard is the recipient of a 2013 Australia Council Creative Australia Fellowship, which assisted Richard’s participation in the 5th Moscow Biennale, as well as the creation of new work, which was shown at Artspace and in upcoming exhibitions.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-04-15 Lenine Bourke appointed to Australia Council The Australia Council for the Arts Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski today announced Lenine Bourke has been appointed Director, Community Partnerships. Mr Grybowski said the Council had undertaken an extensive recruitment process and he was delighted Ms Bourke had accepted the challenge of leading one of the Council’s most diverse areas. “Lenine is joining the Council at an exciting time of change, as we work towards finalising our strategic plan and prepare for the roll out of our new grants program which will take effect next year,” Mr Grybowski said. “She brings a wealth of experience to the Australia Council, having worked in the community arts and cultural development sector for about 13 years as an arts practitioner and an arts executive for a number of dynamic organisations. “Her career has spanned visual and performing arts, including producing and curating large-scale events, festivals, community arts programs, exhibitions, live arts as well as research and policy development. “Until recently she was the artistic director and chief executive officer of Contact Inc in Brisbane, a community cultural development organisation which brings together artists and people from diverse ages, cultures and backgrounds to collaborate on artistic projects. “Lenine’s previous roles include Executive Director at Young People and the Arts Australia, and Program Director at Speakout, where she established the inaugural arts and cultural programs in five indigenous communities in Central, South East and South West Queensland. “She has also worked with the homeless and substance affected young people in inner city Brisbane while at Brisbane City Council, in policy development for the Queensland Office of Youth Affairs and has produced Arts Queensland’s Ideas Festival.” Mr Grybowski said the Australia Council had recognised Ms Bourke’s talent in the community arts and cultural development sector by awarding her the inaugural Kirk Robson Award for leadership in 2006 and the Community Partnership Fellowship in 2013. This is the first time Ms Bourke has worked for the Australia Council and she will start on 1 July. Mr Grybowski thanked Dr David Sudmalis for his contribution as Acting Director, Community Partnerships and confirmed he would remain in that role until the end of June.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-01 Australia Council nurtures emerging leaders Arts managers from across Australia are this week participating in a five-day workshop to further develop their strategic leadership skills. An Australia Council for the Arts initiative, the Emerging Leaders Development Program is aimed at leaders who have demonstrated a commitment to the arts and want to take their career to the next level. The 22 participants will examine a range of issues relevant to arts leaders, such as governance, problem solving, strategic thinking, mentoring and risk management. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the program was established four years ago after a gap was identified in arts leadership development across the country. “There has been a high turnover in managerial positions in small to medium arts organisations due to burnout, a lack of support and recognition of these managers’ commitment and achievements, as well as little assistance for their career development,” Mr Grybowski said. “This program aims to address these issues as well as giving participants the skills required to lead large organisations in an increasingly dynamic and complex social and business environment. “Following the workshop, participants will receive mentoring and coaching from successful arts leaders.” Mr Grybowski and Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM will meet the participants during the workshop and share their experiences of running a large organisation and working with a board. Other leaders scheduled to speak to the participants include Sydney Opera House Programming Director Jonathan Bielski, Carriageworks Director Lisa Havilah, Institute of Modern Art Co-director Aileen Burns and Creative Partnerships Australia Chief Executive Officer Fiona Menzies. The Emerging Leaders Development Program is part of the Australia Council’s Capacity Development Program, which includes a number of mentoring initiatives to develop arts leaders’ skills. Its programs build on existing skills through scholarships, development grants and partnerships with other organisations and mentoring. The Australia Council recently announced the recipients of a number of grants, including the Artistic Leadership and Executive Leadership initiatives and the Philanthropic Mentoring program. Recipients of the Executive Leadership grant include Arts Access Australia Chief Executive Officer Emma Bennison (Tas), Symphony Services International Chief Executive Officer Kate Lidbetter (NSW) and The Desert Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Centre Working Group (NSW). Recipients of the Artistic Leadership grants include South Australia Writers’ Centre Director Sarah Tooth (SA), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Director Aaron Seeto (NSW), Melbourne Writers’ Festival Director/Chief Executive Officer Lisa Dempster (Vic) and artist Nancy Mauro-Flude (Tas). All recipients are selected through a competitive application process.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-01 Artists join Murdoch University student teachers and staff on arts education Six highly skilled Western Australian artists are working alongside Murdoch University student teachers and staff to develop arts programs for schools as part of the national Creative Education Partnerships: Artist-in-Residence Initiative. Department of Culture and the Arts acting chief executive officer Alan Ferris said the project involved artists helping student teachers to deliver innovative school arts programs, develop arts education materials, and promote the public value of arts and culture to the community. “Murdoch University was given a grant to run the project and its School of Education invited artists to express interest in being part of this exciting new way of working,” Mr Ferris said. “Expressions of interest were assessed by the AiR Grants Program panel comprising representatives from the Australia Council, Department of Culture and the Arts, Department of Education, and arts and education sector specialists.” Department of Education Director General Sharyn O’Neill said arts education was an important part of the school curriculum. “I am really pleased that teachers still in training are having the opportunity to work with artists to develop programs and resources for use in schools,” she said. “This is an interesting development opportunity for them and I am sure they will learn so much from the close interaction with some of this State’s most talented working artists. “Most importantly, students in public schools will benefit from this project as will the wider community.” Australia Council for the Arts CEO Tony Grybowski said the Murdoch University residency was for student teachers to build their capacities and skills in the arts through close engagement with artists, so they are well equipped to teach arts subjects to their pupils. “The evidence shows that in placing artists within Schools of Education in universities there is an important flow of arts skills from professional practicing artists to new educators and through to their students,” he said. “We look forward to seeing the impact of this residency, and congratulate the artists on their selection. We also recognise Murdoch University’s innovative approach in designing and undertaking this project.” The student teachers at Murdoch University are studying to become primary school teachers and secondary schools teachers in media arts. The artists are: Stefan Karlsson, White Gum Valley (Dance) Caitlin Beresford-Ord, East Victoria Park (Drama) Leon Ewing, Bayswater (Media Arts) Kate Page, Dianella (Music) Audrey Fernandes-Satar and Arif Satar, Fremantle (Visual Arts) Creative Education Partnerships: Artist-in-Residence Initiative is a Commonwealth arts-in-education program through the Australia Council for the Arts in partnership with the WA Government through the Department of Culture and the Arts and the Department of Education. It is known in WA as the AiR Grants Program. For more information visit http://www.artsedge.dca.wa.gov.au Media contact: DCA Caroline Lacy Tel:  (08) 6552 7300 Email: corporate.affairs@dca.wa.gov.au   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-09 Australia Council awards interdisciplinary artists Some of Australia’s most accomplished artists working across artforms have been celebrated today at a special ceremony to announce the 13 recipients of the Australia Council Fellowships. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM presented the recipients with their fellowships in front of their family and colleagues at the Melbourne Recital Centre this morning. The prestigious fellowships were awarded in two categories – Established artists, who receive $100,000 for one year, and Early Career artists, who receive $60,000 over two years. The six artists to receive the Established Fellowships are: Jon Rose (NSW) Alexander Davies (NSW) Liza Lim (Vic) James Hullick (Vic) Maria Fernanda Cardosa (NSW) Claire Healy (NSW) The seven artists to receive the Early Career Fellowships are: Zoe Pepper (WA) Lara Thoms (Vic) Michaela Davies (NSW) Dale Gorfinkel (NSW) Tintin Wulia (Qld) Julian Day (NSW) David Finnigan (ACT) Mr Myer congratulated the recipients of this year’s fellowships and praised the creative and innovative ideas they presented in their applications. “These fellowships differ from other Australia Council Fellowships as we ask the artists to address interdisciplinary approaches, and they are designed to recognise both early career and established artists who have already made a substantial contribution to Australian culture,” Mr Myer said. “The artists receiving this year’s fellowships clearly demonstrate how their interdisciplinary projects will enhance their artistic practice, while exposing the community to ground-breaking work. “These fellowships support the artists to develop their arts practice, experiment, research and create new ways to present their works and further their artistic ambitions. “Having the time and financial security to focus on their work gives artists the freedom to innovate, experiment, and push boundaries.” Mr Myer said the Australia Council was committed to supporting the development of Australia’s creative talent in all artforms, including interdisciplinary and experimental arts. “The Australia Council has supported interdisciplinary arts for many years through various grants programs and in particular through our Emerging and Experimental Arts section,” Mr Myer said. “It provides funding to artists exploring and experimenting with new forms and processes of making art, including hybrid arts and cross-disciplinary practice such as art/science.” ABOUT THE ARTISTS Australia Council Fellowships – Established Jon Rose (NSW) The central theme of my Jon’s work since 1977 has been the creation of a total art-form about the violin–everything possible to do with, on, and about this iconic instrument. Along with an international career as performer and multimedia artist, the context for his activities remains firmly in the cultural vernacular (e.g. projects involving sport such as Pursuit) and the physical environment of Australia (e.g. projects involving outback artefacts such as fences and wrecks). His creative work has been performed, heard, and seen at major festivals of new music, performance, and media in 40 countries, appeared on over 100 albums, been transmitted through 30 major radiophonic productions worldwide, and been broadcast by several state television companies in Europe. For his Fellowship Jon will devise 8 new installation performance works to be the latest additions to his own invention, the Rosenberg Museum which will be exhibited in six countries including Australia. These new artifacts include a data driven violin robot, a bowing machine, a new long-neck 12-strong cluster tone viola, and Violin Weather - a modified string quartet. Alexander Davies (NSW) Alex Davies is a Sydney artist internationally recognised for his innovative media arts practice. Davies’ practice is at its essence highly interdisciplinary drawing from the areas of electronic arts, music, installation, cinema, photography and theatre. Since 2005, his complex media arts installations routinely involved working with a wide variety of performers, writers, dramaturges, artists and programmers. He recently completed a practice-led PhD examining the relationship between the techniques of stage magic and the creation of illusion in media arts. His proposed fellowship program is based upon two strands of interdisciplinary arts practice through collaboration with global leaders in neuroscience and transmedia development. These include exploration of new modes of narrative development and radical new approaches to visual media. Both these areas of investigation form the core of his highly innovative and engaging media arts works. The fellowship will enable Alex Davies to significantly expand his existing contribution to electronic arts and facilitate research, development and collaboration across disciplines both nationally and internationally. Liza Lim (Vic) Liza Lim’s compositional work was recently praised in The New Yorker by Alex Ross who wrote: ‘she holds a commanding position in international music, her intricately sensuous scores welcomed both at the Los Angeles Philharmonic and at German new-music festivals. Yet she shows an acute sensitivity to the local and particular, to voices on the margins of a smoothly integrated global culture… Lim exemplifies a younger generation of composers who have revivified modernism by kicking away its technocratic façade and heightening its visceral power.’ Lim’s compositions are published by Casa Ricordi (Milan, London & Berlin) and on CDs with Hat Hut, ABC-Classics, Neos, WERGO and Dischi Ricordi. The Creative Australia fellowship would facilitate the research & development for two large-scale projects: an opera ‘Tree of Codes’ based on the exquisite book by Jonathan Safran Foer and an installation work looking at some hidden aspects of women’s culture in China. She will collaborate with musicians of Ensemble musikFabrik, Opera Cologne and ZKM to develop new software tools and instrumental techniques for the opera which will be premiered in early 2016. James Hullick (Vic) James is a sound artist, sculptor, composer, curator, community arts worker, published researcher and artistic director of JOLT and The Click Clack Project. Terrains of sonic excellence that James works through include: electro-acoustic theatre/dance music, 24-hour solo piano performance, recursive compositional techniques, perceptual music making, real time scores, and community arts projects. Working with sound and communities has helped James understand how the (musical) instrument and the user can become one embodied entity; and how the artist, the artwork and those experiencing the artwork can suspend bodily division and exist as one unbroken embodied unity of perceptual insight. During his Fellowship, focused studio time will enable James to expand his creative language across all the senses (not just sound), enabling him to more deeply explore the nuances of human perception. James will be able to expand abilities in sculpture; machine making; filmmaking; and interactive computer programming that have been emerging through his gallery exhibition practice and the creation of shows such as THE NIS. Maria Fernanda Cardosa (NSW) Maria Fernanda Cardoso is a contemporary artist born in Colombia, who lives and works in Sydney. She holds a PhD from Sydney University in art and science (2013) and is now a world’s expert in the reproductive morphology of animals and plants. Her multi-year project MoCO (the Museum of Copulatory Organs, 2008-2012) was one of the highlights of the 18th Biennale of Sydney, attracting over a quarter million visitors and enormous media attention including a half hour ABC ARTSCAPE documentary. MoCO was well received by scientists, art critics and the general public as the project demonstrated Cardoso’s ability to effectively and aesthetically communicate science through the use of sculpture and the moving image. Her Fellowship program, Dancing With Spiders, is an art, science and technology project, which aims to document and display irrefutable visual and auditory proof of artistic expression in the tiniest of Australian spiders: the Maratus jumping spiders. These 3-4 mm long spiders dance and make subsonic vibrations, inaudible to the human ear but revealed to us through the use of laser vibrometer technologies in what could be called music. Using large-scale multi-screen HD Projections Cardosa will make a video art installation featuring the different mating dances and looks of several of the Maratus species, including the amplified sounds they make. Claire Healy (NSW) Claire Healy along with long-time collaborator Sean Cordeiro have been creating work together since the 1990s. Avid travellers, their peripatetic lives inform much of their practice as they explore ideas of home and transience, and engage with issues such as real estate, permutations of space and modes of living. They are best known for transforming everyday objects into large-scale and provocative sculptures and installations. Through the presentation of the deconstructed and the reassembled Healy and Cordeiro literally unpack notions of domicide, and make us question our own materialistic tendencies and the impermanence of occupation. Through the Fellowship Claire plans to explore the act of destruction and its transition to creation, with the focus on the performer rather than the object. Creating a work that is time-based will be a new area of exploration for her and the fellowship is a great opportunity to make this leap, and achieve a quality of production fitting for her vision. During the Fellowship Claire will create two works that will inform an exploration of the process of producing time-based work in collaboration with performers. Australia Council Fellowships – Early Career Zoe Pepper (WA) Zoe is a Perth based interdisciplinary artist in her first 10 years of a practice that spans theatre, live art, film and participatory gaming. Through a rigorous artistic practice Zoe has established a reputation as an artist with potential. She drives every element of her work from writing, design and structural development through to direction, technical refinement and the creation of audio scores. Through her Fellowship Zoe will undertake research and development to inform the creation of a new project. Her research will take her to the UK and the US to work with other artists experimenting with ideas around participatory gaming. The conceptual development of a new project will include a period of practical experimentation in which audio material will be developed and trialled with test audiences. Her research will be assisted through conversations with Perth based software development company, Gramercy Studios, and programming specialists based at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Arts. Lara Thoms (Vic) Lara is an artist who has been working for seven years in the field of socially engaged and participatory art. Her inter-disciplinary practice is centred around performative  experiences, often utilising video, photography and installation. Her work is always context responsive, drawing on a site or issue that allows for collaborative relationships and presentation models. Lara is interested in the areas of participation when artists and non-artists come together, looking at both frictions and shared experiences. Her work has been presented at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Performance Space and Next Wave Festival. Her Fellowship program over the next two years will focus on research development and presentation of major projects working with new and unexpected particpants. She will continue to collaborate with groups Field Theory and Aphids as well as expand her solo practice. Lara will make work for major institutions on a scale she has never attempted before, including creating a street procession with up to 1000 participants and a new project at the Royal Exhibition Building. Each project will be drawn together through a common theme of inviting audiences to reconsider existing social hierarchies. Michaela Davies (NSW) Michaela is an artist who maintains a multi-disciplinary practice across installation, sound, performance and video. A doctor of psychology, her work is informed by an interest in the role of psychological and physical agency in creative processes, and how obstruction can inform both individual development and creative outcomes. During the course of her Fellowship, Michaela will explore performance as a mode of hypothesis testing, drawing on the idea that contemporary participatory art practices can be viewed as performative research. She will investigate the use of technology to extend human capabilities in composition and musical performance, explore the use of obstruction to examine how struggle, effort, and even failure shape a performance, and examine the way physical or psychological obstruction can determine both an individual musical outcome and the trajectory of an artist's development. Dale Gorfinkel (NSW) Dale is an artist with a number of practices spanning improvisation, instrument building, sound installation, multi-instrumental music and outdoor performance. These practices are intimately connected and continuously inform and inspire each other. Dale is passionate about bringing creative communities together & shifting perceived boundaries of scenes, styles & artforms. His work reflects an awareness of the dynamic nature of culture & the value of listening as mode of knowing people & places. Over the course of the Fellowship Dale will focus on the creative development of elements of his practice including foot-pump powered interactive installations, kinetic sound and light sculptures, and new musical collaborations. Tintin Wulia (Qld) Tintin’s art probes into the geopolitical borders that segregate our globalising world. She bases her inquiries in an artistic research informed by critical geopolitics. Her approach to the mediums and materials is also interdisciplinary. With her architectural engineering and music (film scoring) training she works across mediums, fusing installation, mural, video, sound and performance amongst others. She hacks and repurposes ready-mades like IKEA products, neodymium magnets, surveillance cameras and arcade game machines, factoring the materials' original systems into her work. Because the contemporary border is inseparable from the economic globalisation of production, the issues of manual labour and alternative cultures like the Do-It-Yourself/DIY movement are also relevant. The Fellowship will allow Tintin to focus on developing her process-based participatory art practice that has engaged a large number of diverse participants and created seeds for cross-border networks, to generate future dialogues on a global scene with strong local contexts. Through a series of international residencies, periods of research and the development of new works for exhibitions, she will explore methods to radically amplify her work's socio-political networks, linking the socio-economic processes of production, distribution and consumption comprehensively. While her research is interdisciplinary, her primary field is art, where critical discourse is advanced through concretising the intangible. She aims to interweave methodology, mediums and materials, finding new ways to present processes beyond mere documentation. Julian Day (NSW) Julian Day is an artist, composer, writer and broadcaster. His work, although primarily centred on sound, also includes a range of media including installation, video, text and performance. As an advocate for new music and contemporary art Julian also presents and produces programs on ABC radio and writes regularly for a range of media outlets.  He attempts to create simple yet evocative works through largely ephemeral means in which existing objects, architectures and social situations are repurposed. In particular he disperses homogeneous sound to explore the acoustic, architectural and relational properties of such non-traditional spaces as railway sheds, marketplaces, laneways, parks and lakes. Julian will spend his Fellowship researching and consolidating existing artistic interests - community engagement and open participation, critiquing traditional scores and instrumental techniques and bridging the visual art and music worlds. He will work with mentors in New York and collaborate with performers, galleries and community participants in Australia, the USA and UK. These activities will further integrate his composition and visual art output into a well-honed artistic vision, broadening connections to other artists and institutions and laying the groundwork for future projects. David Finnigan (ACT) David is a writer, producer, theatre-maker and performer. He works extensively across disciplines to create a diverse body of work, from interactive performance to theatre to spoken word. David also has extensive experience as a producer and curator of experimental and cross-artform performance work. He has worked as a producer at the Battersea Arts Centre in London and for the HERE Arts Center in New York. In 2009, David cofounded and directed the Crack Theatre Festival, a national festival and forum for experimental performance in Newcastle as part of This Is Not Art. In 2011 he founded the You Are Here Festival, an annual multi-arts festivals taking place in shopfronts and found spaces in Canberra city. In 2013 he co-curated and facilitated the TippingPoint Australia climate-arts conference as part of the Australian Theatre Forum. The Fellowship will continue David’s development as a playwright, science-theatre artist, spoken word performer, festival producer and curator with a focus on interactive and audience-driven work. The Fellowship will allow David to further his professional development by undertaking key multi-year projects with mentors as well as the chance to learn skills and access opportunities that are not otherwise available to an early career artist.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-09 World’s arts leaders come to Melbourne for IETM Around 150 international artists, producers and presenters will arrive in Melbourne next week for the inaugural IETM Satellite meeting. They will join arts leaders from across Australia for the knowledge and cultural exchange event to increase international collaboration and engagement. The Australia Council for the Arts and the International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) will present the three-day meeting in partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne (Asian Performing Arts Program) and Next Wave from Monday 12 May to Wednesday 14 May 2014.  It will be held at Arts Centre Melbourne. Australia Council Executive Director Arts Development Doctor Wendy Were said the IETM Satellite meeting would bring together the most prestigious and innovative performing arts producers and presenters from Europe, Asia, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. “The Australia Council issued an expression of interest to Australian and international performing arts producers and presenters and we have been overwhelmed by the number of applications we have received,” Dr Were said. “There are 82 delegates from Australia, 53 from Europe, 87 from Asia, one from Canada and four from New Zealand. “There is a large contingent from Indonesia and Japan and representatives from countries as diverse as Macau, Myanmar, Bulgaria, Estonia and Sri Lanka.” Dr Were said delegates would discuss a number of topics in workshops and forums, including the arts landscape in Asia and Europe, political and social constraints to making work and traditional and contemporary art. “Photographer and University of NSW Research Fellow in the School of the Arts and Media, William Yang, will give the key note and Australia Council deputy chair Robyn Archer AO will close the event,” Dr Were said. “One of the program highlights will be a panel discussion at Footscray Community Arts Centre on The artist as activist – promoting freedom of speech, democracy and diversity. “Jade Lillie will moderate the panel, consisting of Lin Htet Nyan from Myanmar’s Theatre of the Disturbed, Yudi Tajudin from Indonesia’s Teater Garasi, Anna Lengyel from Hungary’s PanoDrama and Lydia Fairhall from Footscray Community Arts Centre.” IETM is the largest and oldest European network for the performing arts with more than 500 members from 50 countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan and Australia. Dr Were said to broaden its membership outside Europe, several biannual meetings have been held in Asia, including Singapore, China and Japan, but this was the first time the meeting would be held in Australia. “The delegates participating in the Melbourne meeting will have unique access to influential and dynamic arts leaders from around the world to share expertise, build partnerships and create strong networks to facilitate the development of future projects,” Dr Were said. “The meeting coincides with the Next Wave Festival and delegates will participate in events held on Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 May.  Now in its 30th year, the festival will present a range of new work from innovative Australian and international performing and visual artists, including theatre, dance, media and installation art. “Delegates will enjoy a curated weekend of activities that have been programmed for this year’s festival and meet some of the artists and producers involved.”   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-19 Ben Wright Smith awarded Nashville residency Melbourne folk rock musician Ben Wright Smith will spend three months in the United States later this year as part of the Australia Council’s Nashville Songwriter Residency. Australia Council Director Music Paul Mason said the Nashville residency, now in its second year, would include mentoring by one of Australia’s most successful producers. “Nashville is a major music town with a songwriting culture that goes beyond any specific style,” Mr Mason said. “Australian producer Mark Moffatt is hugely respected both here and in Nashville where he is now based. To have him on board as a mentor and facilitator makes this a very powerful opportunity.” Mr Mason said the residency was open to all songwriters and this year attracted many high quality applications. “The aim of the residency is to enable songwriters to develop their writing skills, build creative and business networks and connect with other artists to co-write and collaborate,” Mr Mason said. “Ben is an impressive songwriter. He has already made some connections in Nashville and his application had a clear plan outlining how he would use the three months residency. “His plan includes collaborating with other artists and producers on his unrecorded material, working on his third album, and strengthening his connections in Nashville.” Mark Moffatt said Nashville continued to lead the way as America’s primary writing and recording centre across many genres. “I was thrilled to hear Ben’s music, as he is a perfect fit for the burgeoning Nashville pop/rock scene and I feel certain that he will be warmly embraced by that community,” Mr Moffatt said. “I look forward to helping him settle in to the vibrant writing, performing and recording world we have here.” Ben said he was very excited about receiving the residency and was looking forward to meeting and working with key people in Nashville who could help him further his songwriting and recording career. “I feel really humbled and lucky to be receiving such a great opportunity,” Ben said. “I’m excited about going back to Nashville, but to be recording with Mark is insane. “I think The Saints was one of the first albums I listened to, thanks to my uncle who got me onto that stuff. “There’s always so much music going on in Nashville, so I imagine I’ll be on my feet quite a bit trying to catch everything in town.” Before Ben leaves for Nashville he and his band will launch their debut 7’ In Parallel on Saturday, 28 June at Boney on Little Collins Street, Melbourne. The Nashville Songwriter Residency provides up to $15,000 to cover transport, accommodation and living costs. The Australia Council has previously awarded the residency to Chris Altmann (SA) and Travis Caudle (WA). ABOUT BEN WRIGHT SMITH Ben Wright Smith is a 25-year-old folk rock musician from Melbourne. In 2011 he has released his debut album Autumn Safari and travelled internationally to write and perform in places such as Los Angeles, Havana, New York and Mumbai. In 2012 Ben went to Nashville where he performed at the Americana Music Festival alongside musicians such as Kasey Chambers and Justin Townes Earle. Ben has spent the past year writing, recording, and playing shows with acts such Ash Grunwald, D.D. DUMBO, Holy Holy, Rat & Co and Bertie Blackman, and releasing music from his upcoming 7” In Parallel. The first single, If Living The Good Life Is Easy (Why Is This So Hard?), released late last year, was co-produced with fellow Melbournian Oscar Dawson (HOLY HOLY, Ali Barter) and mixed and mastered by Andrei Eremin (Chet Faker). The song’s music video was shot on location in Blairgowrie, Victoria by Charlie Ford and Josh McKie (Vance Joy and Courtney Barnett). The second single, Fictional received local and nationwide radio play and was also added to the feature play list on Triple J Unearthed.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-23 Australia Council supports first ANZ Festival An impressive list of Australian writers, including Tim Winton, Helen Garner, Anna Funder and Anita Heiss, will share their words, ideas and stories with audiences in London next week at the inaugural Australia & New Zealand Festival of Literature & Arts. The four-day festival will be held from 29 May to 1 June at Kings College. The Australia Council for the Arts is providing support to establish this exciting new initiative and to assist writers attend the event. The aim of this festival is to provide opportunities for Australian and New Zealand writers to engage with publishers, industry and the public to increase readership of their work. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the investment in the festival would provide valuable exposure for Australian writers, attract new audiences and should ultimately increase sales in international markets. “Australia is located in a region that is making some of the world’s most daring and diverse art,” Mr Grybowski said. “The Australia Council is committed to increasing the profile of Australian arts through strategic partnerships and by delivering a range of initiatives, which enable artists to present their work overseas and collaborate with other artists internationally. “The Australia Council already offers support to writers to enter the international market through the Frankfurt Book Fair and overseas writers’ festivals. “A festival showcasing Australian writers in London has been discussed for a number of years and the Australia Council is delighted to see this idea realised.” Australia Council Director Literature Jill Eddington said the event had attracted a list of eminent, emerging and new Australian writers, who will represent the exciting Australian contemporary writing scene. “The festival will be opened by Tim Winton, which will be followed by a program packed with panels and events,” Ms Eddington said. “I will also be chairing two discussions, including one on lost classics from Australia and New Zealand. “The lost classics discussion is particularly topical at the moment, as several Australian publishers, including Text Publishing, have recently reprinted a number of books that have been out of print for many years. “Carmen Callil, Anita Heiss, Stephen Romei and Stephanie Johnson will be on the panel and they will discuss what makes a classic, who makes that decision and how do we stop them from being lost again?” Griffith Review founding editor Prof Julianne Schultz AM will attend the festival and chair three sessions. “In the global market it is easy for the loudest voices to prevail, so this is a great opportunity to showcase wonderful Australian and New Zealand writers to readers, expats and publishers in one of the great centres for ideas and publishing,” Ms Schultz said. “I have no doubt that the freshness, originality and excellence of the writers will stimulate great interest in the unique perspective that has flourished in the southern hemisphere.” For more information on the festival, go to: http://ausnzfestival.com   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-26 Australia Council awards Indigenous excellence Outstanding achievement in Indigenous arts will be celebrated tomorrow night at the Australia Council’s National Indigenous Arts Awards. The annual awards celebrate the work and contributions of four exceptional Indigenous artists, and will be presented at a ceremony on Tuesday at the Sydney Opera House at 6pm. These prestigious national awards include the Red Ochre Award, two Fellowships and the Dreaming Award. This year the Red Ochre, Australia’s most esteemed peer-assessed award for an Indigenous artist, will be presented to senior visual artist Hector Tjupuru Burton. Awarded since 1993, the $50,000 prize acknowledges an artists’ outstanding contribution and lifetime achievement to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts at a national and international level. Renowned Melbourne musicians Bart Willoughby and Dave Arden will each receive Fellowships, which provides $45,000 a year for two years to create a major project. The Dreaming Award provides $20,000 to a young artist aged 18-26 to create a major body of work through mentoring or partnerships. It will be awarded to interdisciplinary artist Tyrone Sheather. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM said the annual awards give the highest acknowledgement to the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Indigenous artists. “The awards draw attention to the significant contribution Indigenous artists make to the artistic vibrancy and cultural life of Australia,” Mr Myer said. “They encourage us to experience, participate in and cherish the dynamic work that is created.” Australia Council Board Director Lee-Ann Buckskin said Hector Tjupuru Burton was chosen as this year’s Red Ochre Award recipient for his remarkable work as a visual artist and cultural leader. “Mr Burton, a senior Pitjantjatjara man, started painting on canvas in October 2003 after a Men’s Painting Room was established to encourage men to tell and paint their stories,” Ms Buckskin said. “Since this life-changing event, Mr Burton has revived ceremonies and documented and recorded stories both north and south of Amata, including the area associated with Uluru. “He paints the Creation Time story of the caterpillars, the Anumara, which tells a story about kinship groups. “Mr Burton’s art has been collected by major institutions, including the Art Gallery of NSW, the Art Gallery of South Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Ian Potter Museum of Art, and the University of Melbourne.” Ms Buckskin said Bart Willoughby, founding member of No Fixed Address and a featured artist in the Black Arm Band, was the first Indigenous artist to record on the Melbourne Town Hall organ. “For Bart’s two-year fellowship project he will stage a series of concerts, which will feature him playing the organ, and promote his album We Still Live On inspired by the instrument,” Ms Buckskin said. “Dave Arden has worked with many Aboriginal artists, including Hard Time Band, Koori Youth Band, Mixed Relations and Bart Willoughby, and written and performed songs for numerous albums. “For his fellowship Dave will develop and perform original songs with accompanying stories and projected images about five generations of his family, called The Dave Arden Kokatha/Gunditjmara Songman and Storyteller Showcase. “Tyrone, our final winner, is a young Gumbaynggirr artist from northern NSW who works across several artforms, including photography, film, projection art, paint, textiles and dance. “Tyrone’s project will be GIIDANYBA – glowing, interactive humanoid sculptures, emitting sound and two-meters tall, which symbolise the knowledge keepers of the old world. Tyrone will be mentored by other artists as well as Aboriginal elders.” ABOUT THE ARTISTS Red Ochre Award Hector Tjupuru Burton (SA) Hector Tjupuru Burton is an Aboriginal artist from Amata, in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands of Central Australia. His work has been shown in exhibitions since 2003, in cities across Australia and overseas. His first solo exhibition was held in Melbourne in 2004. Hector’s paintings are held in the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of South Australia, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, and Flinders University. Hector has been a finalist for the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Awards in 2011 and 2012. A curator, teacher and Christian Minister, Hector is revered as a caretaker of Anangu law and culture, and has been vital to the recent success and celebrated innovation of the local arts centre, Tjala Arts. Fellowships Bart Willoughby (Vic) Bart Willoughby was first Aboriginal artist to appear in and write lyrics for a docu-drama, the first Aboriginal artist to score a feature film and one of the first to sign a record deal. In 1978 he formed the band No Fixed Address and toured Australia and the UK. No Fixed Address is acknowledged as the tip of the spear of contemporary Aboriginal music. Teacher, collaborator and international ambassador, Bart also starred in the film Wrong side of the Road. He performed at the Edinburgh Festival with the band Colored Stone before re-forming No Fixed Address and touring the USA with Yothu Yindi. In 1989 he formed Mixed Relations and toured extensively in Australia and overseas. Bart continues to tour internationally. Dave Arden (Vic) Dave Arden is a highly respected Australian guitarist and singer. He has performed with many Aboriginal artists from Hard Time Band and Koori Youth Band, Archie Roach, Ruby Hunter, Tiddas, Bart Willoughby, Mixed Relations and with members of Goanna, Crowded House, Not Drowning Waving, Hunters and Collectors and Weddings, Parties, Anything. A poetic story teller who embraces a rich cultural heritage, Dave was a member of The Black Arm Band. As a guitarist with Archie Roach, he has toured extensively both nationally and internationally. Dave has also written and performed songs for numerous albums, including his album Goodatha/Gunditjmara clan. Inspired by the war service of his grandparents, Dave’s latest release, Freedom Called, in collaboration with Paul Kelly, is a song of remembrance for Indigenous service men and women. Dave’s fellowship project is the Dave Arden Songman Storyteller Showcase. Dreaming Award Tyrone Sheather (NSW) Tyrone Sheather is an Gumbaynggir artist working within several different art mediums, including photography, film, projection art, paint, textiles and dance. Tyrone made his first film entirely in Gumbaynggirr Language in 2008. This film won Best Short Film and People’s Choice at the Local Clapper Film Festival. The film The Wijiirrjagi is still being used for language teaching by Muurrbay Language Centre and for cultural consciousness training. In 2009 Tyrone received the Lester Bostock scholarship, which included mentorship, a budget and equipment to make a short film, Quarantine. He was artistic director in the inter-arts program Giinagay Gumbaynggirr, funded through the NSW Aboriginal Regional Arts Fund. It is an interactive exhibition that blends art forms to create a tangible world of contemporary Gumbaynggirr knowledge. Tyrone recently staged in Bellingen, NSW an Australia Council funded photographic exhibition Dreaming Aloud, bringing a contemporary view to the original stories of Gumbaynggirr country and those of his great-grandfather. Winners photos here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/8nn5rampl4qnd4o/AABNFmQIbK2KLJQbQDzyhWwVa ABOUT THE AWARDS The National Indigenous Arts Awards were established by the Australia Council’s former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board, consisting of leading Indigenous artists, curators and arts managers, to recognise the outstanding work and achievements of their fellow artists. The awards are decided by a panel of Indigenous arts peers from each state and territory, including the Torres Strait. The prestigious Red Ochre Award has been awarded since 1993 for lifetime achievement to an outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait artist. The Dreaming Award, for a young Indigenous artist, was first awarded in 2012 to playwright Nakkiah Lui. The 2014 awards will be hosted by Rhoda Roberts at the Sydney Opera House. Rachel Maza will present the Fellowships, Ben Graetz will present the Dreaming Award and Australia Council Board Director Lee-Ann Tjunypa Buckskin, a Narungga, Wirangu, Wotjobaluk woman, will present the Red Ochre Award. The Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM and Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski will each speak at the ceremony. Red Ochre Award recipients 1993-20132013 David Gulpilil 2012 Warren H Williams 2011 Archie Roach 2010 Michael Leslie 2009 Gawirrin Gumana 2008 Doris Pilkington Garimara 2006 Tom E. Lewis 2005 Seaman Dan 2004 John Bulunbulun 2003 Jimmy Little 2002 Dorothy Peters 2001 Banduk Marika 2000 Mervyn Bishop 1999 Justine Saunders 1998 Bob Maza 1997 Jimmy Chi 1996 Maureen Watson 1995 Rita Mills 1994 Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri 1993 Eva Johnson   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-05-30 Study shows more Australians participating in the arts New Australia Council research shows 95 per cent of Australians have engaged with the arts in the past 12 months. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts survey released today told a great story about the way Australian’s engage with the arts, and their appreciation of its capacity to enrich their lives. “The survey measured public attitudes and participation in the arts, both as consumers and creators. It is an example of the Council’s commitment to providing a stronger evidence base for how we understand and talk about arts and culture in Australia,” Mr Grybowski said. “I am delighted that the report provides tangible evidence that the arts are an intrinsically important part of Australian’s lives. “The 2013 findings are compared to those from the first iteration of the study conducted in 2009, and I’m pleased to say there have been positive changes in most categories. “The survey covers visual arts and crafts, music, theatre, dance and literature, as well as community and Indigenous arts. It is particularly exciting to see more Australians valuing the central role Indigenous arts and culture play in our nation’s cultural fabric.” Some of the key findings include: 85 per cent of Australians think the arts make for a richer and more meaningful life. 92 per cent of Australians think Indigenous arts are an important part of Australia’s culture. 66 per cent of Australians think the arts have a big impact on the development of children. 48 per cent of Australians are creating art, compared to 41 per cent in 2009. “The research also demonstrates how important Australians consider the arts to a child’s development and how their engagement with the arts when young influences their participation as an adult,” Mr Grybowski said. “It is a testament to the strength and vitality of Australian art and culture that not only are attitudes about the arts increasingly positive, but the depth of engagement has increased, with more Australians making art as well as being inspired by the work of others.“The 2009 findings were widely referenced and we anticipate that this new report will also provide valuable insights for a broad set of stakeholders, as well as affirming the fundamental place the arts have in our lives.” The research is based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of 3,000 people from around the country and was conducted in late 2013. The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts report and fact sheets can be found here.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-06-10 Vale Gordon Bennett In memoriam Gordon Bennett 1955 – 2014 The Australia Council acknowledges the passing of contemporary Indigenous visual artist Gordon Bennett. Mr Bennett received international acclaim as one of Australia's most significant and critically engaged contemporary artists. His work has been exhibited at prestigious exhibitions internationally, most recently at the Berlin Biennale 2014 and dOCUMENTA 13, as well as many of Australia’s major state and national institutions. Throughout his 30 year career Mr Bennett made a substantial contribution to the Australian arts scene – examining Australia’s history and constructed representations of our society through his practice. He is recognised for his powerful perspectives on the post colonial experience, with much of his work mapping alternative histories and questioning racial categorisations and stereotypes.  Mr Bennett’s art practice is interdisciplinary and encompasses painting, photography, printmaking, video, performance and installation. Australia Council Board Director Lee-Ann Buckskin acknowledged that “Gordon Bennett’s work had awakened a new code of artistic language through the exploration of Aboriginal urbanism identity and nationhood. Mr Bennett’s unique style of abstract, postmodernist art influenced how we see and describe ourselves, inspiring a generation of Aboriginal artists to challenge stereotypes and the political status quo. The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to his family and friends. 2014-06-12 14th International Architecture Exhibition The 14th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice showcases some of the finest architectural designs and concepts globally. Augmented Australia, the Australian Exhibition, is currently being shown on a temporary site located directly across the canal from the Australian Pavilion site in the Giardini. Augmented Australia will bring 22 unbuilt Australian projects to life from the last century through a specially designed app, created by The Australian Institute of Architects. Visitors will be able to explore 11 historical and 11 contemporary buildings including the new Australian pavilion. Director of Augmented Australia, Professor Philip Goad of University of Melbourne, outlines what will be on show at the Biennale. "Augmented Australia will be a new and technologically cutting edge picture of unbuilt visions and dreams for Australian architecture. Responding directly to Rem Koolhaas’s theme of one hundred years of modernity, digital reconstructions of 11 historic unbuilt public projects show the tensions faced by Australian architects in dealing with national identity, modernization and a constant desire to be international”. The 14th International Architecture Exhibition runs until November in Venice. 2014-06-23 Vale Liam Davison The Australia Council is very saddened by the tragic death of Australian writer Liam Davison and his wife Frankie. The couple were passengers on MH17. Liam, 56, was an award-winning novelist and a recipient of Australia Council grants, including a four-year Senior Writers’ Fellowship in 1995. Liam will be remembered for his significant contribution to Australian Literary culture. The Australia Council expresses its deepest sympathies to Liam and Frankie’s  family and friends. Read more about Liam and Frankie Davison here 2014-06-25 Australia Council promotes disability leadership in the arts The Australia Council for the Arts is presenting a suite of activities from next month to develop the leadership skills of people with disability and enhance their access to leadership roles across the cultural sector. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the events aligned with the Council’s Disability Action Plan by encouraging people with disability to participate in the arts and delivering a leadership program for artists and arts workers with disability. “These events build on our initiatives to improve access for people with disability announced in December last year, such as the Artists with Disability funding program, increased funding to national peak body Arts Access Australia and the launch of the Council’s Disability Action Plan for 2014-2016,” Mr Grybowski said. The Council is inviting applications from cultural leaders and influencers with disability to participate in a five-day intensive leadership development program to be held in Sydney from 22 to 26 October. The Sync Leadership program will be presented by Jo Verrent, a UK-based artist, producer and consultant with disability who specialises in diversity and access, and is a Senior Producer with the Unlimited Festival. Jo believes that ‘different’ is delicious not divergent and that it adds vibrancy and texture within the cultural sector. She works with arts and cultural agencies, organisations and individuals to create policy which promotes diversity and recognises the benefits of employing people with disability in leadership roles within the cultural sector.” The Sync Leadership program will provide up to 12 people with disability training in leadership and coaching. Following the five-day intensive, each member will be offered coaching sessions over six months with Jo or Sarah Pickthall, the co-creator of the Sync program. Mr Grybowski said the Council had also engaged Jo to present a series of public forums next month in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide to enable anyone interested in applying for the program, or more generally in leadership within the arts or disability sector, to meet Jo and benefit from her expertise. The forums are being presented in partnership with Arts NSW, Arts Victoria, Arts Queensland and Arts SA, with presentation support from Carriageworks, Queensland Performing Arts Centre, Adelaide Festival Centre and Malthouse Theatre. Arts Access Australia CEO Emma Bennison said she was thrilled the Council was bringing Jo to Australia. “Jo is an extraordinary and authentic leader whose expertise will inform and engage the arts and cultural sector in an important and long overdue conversation about how to increase leadership by people with disability.” Applications for the Sync Leadership workshop close on 30 July. To appy, go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/Jo-Verrent-Sync-Leadership-Program The Leadership and Disability forums will be held in Sydney on Friday, 4 July, Brisbane on Monday, 7 July, Adelaide on Wednesday, 9 July and Melbourne on Thursday, 10 July. To register, go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/events/2014/Jo-Verrent-Leadership-and-Disability-Forums For more information on Jo Verrent, go to: http://www.joverrent.com   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-06-27 Australia Council connects arts marketers to talk about Australian audiences The Australia Council for the Arts has put together an impressive line up of speakers to engage the 250 arts marketers attending next week’s two-day national marketing summit in Hobart. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said Marketing Summit 2014: The Art of Connectivity, opening on Monday, 30 June, was an important event. It brings together marketing and communications professionals from across the country to discuss how we understand and develop audiences for Australian arts, and how media consumption and evolving digital technologies can enable new ways of connecting. “We are delighted to be celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Australia Council marketing summit, as it is an important time to be exploring how we engage broader audiences with the rich and dynamic work produced by Australian artists and arts organisations,” Mr Grybowski said. “The Australia Council is in a unique position as the federal arts agency to draw a national community of arts professionals together to share their knowledge and experience and discuss new ideas, which translate across different artforms and audiences. “There is a lot of innovative work already being done in arts marketing across the sector, both in engaging inventively with audiences and in raising the profile of Australian arts. “However, we are working in an ever evolving market, which requires responsive and creative strategies. “Our speakers are leaders in their field and I have no doubt they will ignite new thinking about connecting in ways that open new experiences of arts and culture to Australians across the country.” There will be four keynote addresses over the two days, given by The Impossible Institute Chief Creative Officer Kieran Flanagan, UK-based artist, producer and consultant with disability Jo Verrent, Google Creative Director Tom Uglow and PwC Executive Director Megan Brownlow. Kieran will focus on communication trends and collaborating with the community, Jo will speak about how to connect with diverse audiences and moving out of our comfort zones, Tom will talk about innovative ways technology has been used and how humans will connect in the future, and Megan will talk about her extensive research on the best ways to connect with audiences and meeting those challenges in the future. There will also be a number of panels and discussions, which will be led by: Writer and Adjunct Professor at the University of Technology, Sydney Anita Heiss Bundanon Trust Marketing and Communications Manager and TEDx Sydney Co Director, Partnerships Kate Dezarnaulds Pandora Australia and New Zealand Managing Director Jane Huxley ILBIJERRI Theatre Company Artistic Director Rachel Maza Zenith Optimedia Head of Planning Gary Peace Curator and Festival Director Jess Scully Digital Infusions Chief Executive Officer Scott Ward Arts Access Australia Chief Executive Officer Emma Bennison Australian Chamber Orchestra Philanthropy Manager Jill Colvin ABC Radio National Drive presenter and Australia Council Board member Waleed Aly. For more information on the summit, go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/projects/marketingsummit   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-06-27 Australia Council funds artistic partnerships with Asia The Australia Council for the Arts has funded 13 dynamic projects that enable Australian artists to collaborate with artists in Asia to create and present new work. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the Creative Partnerships with Asia Program, now in its second year, was an important part of the Council’s strategy to build artistic networks and increase collaborations with Asia. “The program is designed to facilitate creative exchanges and collaborations between Australian and Asian artists in all artforms,” Mr Grybowski said. “Grants of up to $40,000 have been awarded to enable the creation and presentation of new work to audiences in both regions and support long-term networks. “The creativity and diversity of the 13 funded projects is impressive and cover a wide variety of artforms, including writing, performance, visual arts, dance, music and experimental arts. “Australian artists will be working with arts professionals in nine countries, including India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Taiwan and Cambodia.” One of the projects will see three Australian artists based in Queensland and two Iraqi artists in Baghdad collaborate and develop a new work that will be staged in Brisbane, Townsville and Baghdad. Bilingual open performance workshops will also be held in the three cities for up to 12 established and emerging English or Arabic-speaking artists. The project will be led by Iraqi-Australian Niz Jabour and hosted by La Boite Theatre Company in Brisbane and the Iraqi National Theatre, the Iraqi Experimental Theatre Group and Links Guide, all based in Baghdad. La Boite Artistic Director and CEO Chris Kohn said the company was looking forward to working with the artists. “La Boite is thrilled to be involved in this breakthrough artistic collaboration between Australia and Iraq – two nations whose recent histories have been so profoundly intertwined but between which there has been precious little artistic collaboration,” Mr Kohn said.The LITERARY COMMONS! project will bring together writers from Australia and India, including Alexis Wright, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Anita Heiss and Tony Birch, to explore First Nations/Indigenous and bhasha/Dalit literature. Curated by Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty from the University of Western Sydney, the writers will take part in a number of literary events in India, including the Jaipur Literature Festival and the Goa Arts and Literature Festival, as well as workshops in Australia. First Nations Australia Writers’ Network Chairperson Kerry Reed-Gilbert said the diversity of languages in India was similar to the Aboriginal language profile. “To be able to see how publications and literature are placed in India with this diversity is one that Australian literature could learn some valuable insights from,” Ms Reed-Gilbert said. “I believe that this project could lead to many other opportunities in the future and will enhance individual writers with their work and career.” Eligible projects must achieve at least two objectives – deliver workshops that enable artistic exchange and develop networks in both countries; presentation in both countries of final development showings or a program of open studio visits with curators or potential presenting partners; or showing completed work in both countries. To see all the successful projects, go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/grant-decisions/reports/arts-funding-division-assessment-meeting-reports/CPWA-Assessment-Meeting-Report-2014   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-07-03 CEO Tony Grybowski opens the 2014 Marketing Summit Marketing Summit 2014: The Art of Connectivity Speech given by Australia Council CEO Tony Grybowski Monday, 30 June 2014, Hobart Good morning everyone.  On behalf of the Australia Council a very warm welcome to this year’s Marketing Summit. Thank you Nathan and Skye Maynard for giving us such a beautiful Welcome to Country. I would like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land we meet on, and pay my respects to their elders, past and present. It may be cold outside, but I suspect a lot of warmth and excitement will be generated by the conversations set to take place over the next two days.   This year is a milestone - our tenth annual Marketing Summit. We have a very special program for you over the next few days, taking place in two wonderful venues; here in the beautiful Baha’i Centre of Learning and tomorrow at the Museum of Old and New Art.  In fact, there’s a feast of art for you to enjoy, including the Art for the Summit exhibition here at the Baha’i Centre, thanks to the Colville Gallery and its artists.  For those of you who have attended before, you will notice that the focus and format of the Summit has evolved.  We have moved away from an emphasis on a particular art form or part of the sector.  Instead we are focusing on our shared challenges and opportunities - exploring the ways we connect, or want to connect, with new and existing audiences – and embracing new ways of thinking about how we do it meaningfully, and with impact.   That is why the next two days are all about The Art of Connectivity.   It is about connecting with our unique Tasmanian setting, discussing new ideas, exploring great case studies, and having a dialogue with experts who we hope will inspire and inform you.  Most of all it is about connecting with your peers around this room.  Can I suggest that this is no time to be shy? Or perhaps that is a redundant thing to say to a room full of marketers and communicators!  I hope each one of you shares your ideas and achievements with your colleagues, and are perhaps brave enough to share what hasn’t worked - as you may be surprised by what you learn.  While the Summit celebrates its first decade, the Australia Council has just celebrated four of them. It’s a big year for us as many of you know, with a significant evolution in our vision for the arts in Australia and the rollout of reforms which have strategic and very practical positive impact on the different ways we support and partner with artists and arts organisations.  We will be launching our new strategy and announcing our new grants model soon and I wanted to share a little of them with you.  But first, as you head into these two days, let me say a few words to set the scene.  The first thing I’d like to stress is this: what you do - what all of us in the arts world do - matters.  At the Australia Council we truly believe that artists are the heroes.  We also know that all heroes need a fantastic support team.  Your passion, commitment, talent and hard work are all essential to a flourishing cultural life in Australia. And you might be surprised to learn just how deeply Australians value your contribution.  Last month we released the next iteration of our arts participation survey – The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts – which provides a wealth of intelligence about where we are now and where we’ve come from, in comparison to the previous survey known as ‘More than bums on seats’. Understanding attitudes and behaviours is not just interesting it’s at the heart of understanding your audiences, informing your work, and influencing our national conversations about arts and culture. I know you are hearing about The Arts in Daily Life in more detail from Rachel Smithies from our Research team later today, but I want to draw on a few key themes that really set the scene for our thinking at the Summit. The survey shows that the arts are now all but universal in Australians' lives, of course with very varied levels of participation.  Fifteen years ago, three times more Australians thought that the arts were 'not really for people like me' than think so today. For more Australians than ever before, the arts have an intrinsic value – an acknowledgement that they make for a richer and more meaningful life. They're also seen as important in self-expression, for thinking and working creatively, dealing with stress, and community identity. Significantly, more Australians are acknowledging that the arts have a big impact on the development of our nation’s children - an important message to those of you working in community engagement and education programs.  Creativity starts with childhood curiosity, and the arts have a profound role to play in igniting that spark.  One wonderful fact is that people who were regularly taken by their parents to arts or cultural events are almost twice as likely to make art in later life.  This gels with my own experience, and no doubt yours as well. I vividly recall my own early encounters with the arts.  As a kid, seeing the water wall at the National Gallery of Victoria.  The huge, peaceful exhibition halls and wonderful paintings.  Or my first experience of the theatre - seeing Jesus Christ Superstar.  All the excitement and power of those voices - not to mention that hair and sweat! And like many of you, school was very important to me as a space to foster that interest and enjoyment, through music and art classes and having fun in school plays and musicals.  For the vast majority of Australians, there is recognition of the immense value of the arts and creativity to our world.   And that means valuing the marketers and communicators who connect that talent and creativity to individuals and communities. At the Council we are proud to be promoting this national love affair with the arts.  They are inherently valuable, enriching life in a myriad of ways.  The second point I want to stress is that we have a flourishing arts culture in this country. Today, if you include reading, 19 out of every 20 Australians participate in the arts. And while the arts should never be purely - or even largely - valued predominantly as an economic input, according to research by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, around a billion dollars is generated each year just through tickets sale to live performance and arts events.  And every international visitor undertakes at least one cultural activity when they come to our shores.  So that’s very good news.  But we are gathered here for this Summit because no one should underestimate the enormous challenges faced by you and your organisations as you strive to maintain existing audiences, build new ones and cut through the noise of a crowded and media saturated marketplace.  It’s not easy to promote the arts when all budgets, including marketing, are tightening, arts journalism is shrinking in most areas, and when, with so many channels and technologies available, it is still sometimes hard to know which options will achieve the most effective results.  And it means for all of us that we have to ensure the investments we do make, really count. Thankfully we also know that arts organisations in Australia have a great capacity for innovation and renewal, and many are adapting to this new era with flair and courage, and without compromising - even while raising - their artistic standards.    Now let me turn to the Australia Council to give you an update on how we fit into this picture of Australian artistic ambition, energy and adaptation.  We are in the process of our own transformation – in fact, it’s no exaggeration to say we are undergoing the biggest transformation in our history. Soon we will be releasing our new five-year strategic plan, the outcome of hard work and deep reflection on behalf of many people.  At its heart will be our vision for a culturally ambitious Australia.  When we embarked on some serious new thinking about the future of the arts our starting point is that we have a unique culture in our country, shaped by tens of thousands of years of continuous Indigenous storytelling, embedded in the deep and rich cultures of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples…and reflecting two centuries of settlement from around the world, which has added even more diversity to our cultural fabric.  With that in mind I’m sure you would agree that we are, and certainly should be, a culturally ambitious nation.  With this next chapter in our history the Council is re-defining its role as champion and advocate for the arts in this country, and as a key investor in artistic excellence. Our work will respond to the fact that we believe that the arts should transcend borders of all kinds, that they should be part of daily life for Australians no matter where they live, that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and culture is to be cherished, and that Australia should be known for its great artists.  This means we will be engaging in and encouraging more dialogue, collaboration and exchange with international partners.  We will be supporting arts organisations to invest in initiatives that drive community relevance, as well as innovation and artistic vibrancy.  We will partner with the different tiers of government on targeted arts development in metro and regional areas. And we will be looking for initiatives which give more Australians the chance to engage meaningfully with Indigenous arts and culture.   Now passion, aspiration and vision are wonderful things, but not if they don’t translate to action. While there is a lot to come in the years ahead, in this year alone there are three specific and particularly significant areas of work which I want to share briefly with you. They impact directly on how we invest in the making and presenting of great work, how we ensure that the voice of artists are heard, and how we are strengthening the evidence base for our national arts narrative. Firstly - a key aspect of our transformation is a redesign of our grants model.  The new model will be announced in about two months and open in January 2015. It is structured to support a more diverse range of artists, artistic practice, organisations and arts activity, while making it easier to navigate the practical process of applying for grants.  It means that instead of artists and organisations having to squeeze their vision into a narrowly defined category, they can pitch the projects they want to do. We have also spent a lot of time exploring how best to support small to medium arts organisations, which I know many of you come from, and we will continue to collaborate with you on finding options which promote sustainability in the arts ecology.  To support these new models we have called on the expertise of you and your colleagues as artists and arts professionals, not only to keep peer assessment central to what we do, but to strengthen it. Rotating membership on assessment panels and a much larger and more diverse pool of peer assessors from across the country ensures that we mirror the diversity of the sector, and respond more flexibly to evolving arts practice and the needs of each round.  We will of course continue to deliver a range of new and existing market and audience development initiatives in Australia and overseas. We are committed to fostering new collaborations and partnerships as well as engaging in a range of other strategic activities, some you are familiar with as well as exciting new ones.  An important area where the Australia Council is strengthening its capacity is research.  There are a lot of unfortunate myths out there about the role of the arts in Australian life – including lingering negative perceptions that the arts don’t matter to most Australian or questions about the need for public investment.  Our Arts in Daily Life survey emphatically dispels some of those myths, but we need to do more to explain and demonstrate the powerful and beneficial role of the arts in Australia, and better understand the health and evolving shape of our sector. So in a significant new initiative the Australia Council will report annually on the state of the arts to provide a snapshot of sector growth and sustainability. The first State of the Arts Report will be launched in November of this year and we look forward to your feedback as we continue to enrich and refine it each year. This work should, we believe, provide a valuable resource for everyone in the arts community.  Indeed, our enhanced research program more broadly will contribute significantly to the evidence base which informs arts policy development, supports marketing and development, and creates a more informed public dialogue about the arts. This is just a snapshot of our plans, and the Council is excited about the direction we are heading and the opportunities to partner with you in realising these aspirations.  With these and other initiatives the Australia Council will be looking to support the work of arts organisations as you reach out and connect with audiences, partners, funders and the broader community. Let me conclude.  More Australians than ever before know that the arts make a profound difference to the well-being of individuals and communities.   All of you contribute to that critical link between artists and audiences, and to increasing the access that Australians from all backgrounds and locations have to the arts.  Recent years have seen striking examples of success in forging these connections.  And with your hard work audiences are responding enthusiastically, with benefits across our community and our economy as well.  But the future will no doubt continue to be challenging. I hope this Summit is a great chance to refresh your thinking by being away from the office and in an environment which challenges you to consider new ideas, approaches and build your networks.  I also hope you take advantage of this wonderful city, and the two wonderful venues in which we are hosting this Summit.  I want to extend a personal thank you to all the speakers for sharing their wisdom and experience.  And I wish you all a wonderful, productive and inspirational two days.  2014-07-04 One-stop shop to get the Art Facts The Australia Council for the Arts has today released a comprehensive, statistical overview of the Australian arts sector on its Art Facts website. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer Tony Grybowski said the Arts Facts Overview was the latest addition to the Council’s Art Facts project.  It brings together valuable information about the arts sector from data collected by the Australia Council, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and industry stakeholders. “The arts sector is constantly evolving and the statistics we’ve gathered for the Art Facts Overview show many positive trends,” Mr Grybowski said. “The interactive Art Facts website brings together facts, figures and research from across the sector into one place to provide a detailed picture of the key trends, issues and opportunities for the arts. “The Art Facts Overview findings are split into five categories – arts creation, industry, participation, global trade and industry support. “Users of the website will be able to discover a range of interesting facts, have the ability to share their findings, leave comments, “like” what they learn and test their knowledge through an online quiz.” Some of the key findings in the Art Facts Overview include: 89 per cent of Australians think the arts are an important part of education. 92 per cent of Australians think Indigenous arts are an important part of Australia’s culture.  Philanthropic income to the Major Performing Arts organisations has doubled since 2009. One in three artists use their creative skills in other industries. Live performances generated more than $1 billion in ticket sales in 2012. Mr Grybowski said the Art Facts Overview draws on several new pieces of research the Council had provided to the sector and the public to keep them informed of trends and changes in the arts. “Last month the Australia Council released The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts survey, which measured public attitudes and participation in the arts, both as consumers and creators,” Mr Grybowski said. “The survey provided tangible evidence that the arts are an intrinsically important part of Australian’s lives and culture, with positive changes in most categories since the survey was last undertaken in 2009. “The Art Facts Overview will be added to existing research already on the Art Facts website, which has specific information on visual arts and music. “We plan to expand this research resource to include other artform areas, such as literature, dance and theatre. “These research projects are part of the Council’s commitment to providing a stronger evidence base for how we understand and talk about arts and culture in Australia." The Art Facts Overview data can be found here: http://artfacts.australiacouncil.gov.au/ The Artfacts Overview Factsheet can be found here.   The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts report and fact sheets can be found here: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/resources/reports_and_publications/subjects/audiences_and_cultural_participation/arts-participation     Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (84.3 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-07-15 Exposing Australia’s love affair with the arts What's a typical Australian? More than half of us have a parent who wasn't born here. Most of us live in a city large even by global standards. Relative to the rest of the world we are rich, and we live a long time. And - here's the surprise - almost all of us participate in the arts, and half of us make art. This is not our self-image, nor is it how we project Australia to the rest of the world much of the time. The archetypal Australian, partly borne of our literature and film, is a bushman with grandparents from the 'old country', passionate about sport. You say, “Surely, that’s out of date?” Pull out an Australian passport, and its images are flora and fauna, bush scenes, and the only building is an outback pub. Over the past few decades, Australia has transformed itself. We have moved into cities, grown service industries, welcomed migrants from all round the world and changed the national diet from ‘meat and three veg’ to a kaleidoscope of variety, taste and imagination. We have also embraced the arts. According the survey released last month by the Australia Council, The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts, 19 in 20 Australians participate in the arts. That's if you include reading – dominated by reading novels. Four in five Australians participate in arts other than literature. One in two Australians make art. All of these numbers have increased since the last survey in 2009, and they've come a long way since the first survey in 1999. Over the past four years the big changes are increases in the number of Australians making music - playing an instrument or singing in a choir - and the number of Australians making visual art or craft. At the same time, as the use of the internet and electronic devices rose, old-style – or timeless – art-making rose too. Of course, some Australians face real obstacles to their engagement. Those with a disability, migrants, and regional residents are less likely to participate in and make art. But the differences overall, and for individual art forms, are surprisingly small. For all these groups, their participation is often not much different, and invariably at least two thirds of the participation rate of the general population. Childhood experiences are vital to making things even better. People who were regularly taken by their parents to arts or cultural events are almost twice as likely to make art in later life. We owe it to our children to give them the opportunity to “be Australian” by participating in the arts. For the arts are now all but universal in Australians' lives. Fifteen years ago, one in three Australians thought arts were 'not really for people like me'. Today it's only one in nine. But this participation remains a guilty secret for many – part of our self-image as individuals, but not part of our self-image as a country. A recent television program identified sports at the top of the scale as 'dinky-di Australian', and the arts as, well, un-Australian (surely it’s even more un-Australian to use tired, clichéd language). A challenge for the arts in Australia is to ensure that Australians know that their fellow Australians share their secret passions. Ironically, as participation in the arts has grown, a lot of arts policy has focused on the instrumental value of the arts – what they do for the economy, for regional development, for academic achievement. Some suggest that this is a response by the cultural sector to governments at all levels placing greater scrutiny on spending across all sectors of their economies. Accordingly, activities that have intrinsic but unquantifiable value struggle to justify the allocation of taxpayer funds. The arts do have instrumental value, and creative industries in particular will increasingly underpin our economic future. At the same time it is imperative that the cultural sector confidently articulates the intrinsic value of the arts to policy makers. We should give up on the guilt complex. Apart from anything else, it's not working. For most Australians, the impact of the arts on the economy is minimal. In fact, if one excludes the many commercial activities that rely on creative individuals (many of whom trained in art schools), the arts are not a particularly large part of our economy. But then, that's not the point, as most Australians understand. For four in five Australians, the arts are valuable in themselves – they make for a richer and more meaningful life. They're seen as important in self-expression, thinking creatively, dealing with stress, and community identity. It's time we outed our national love affair with the arts. They're not a niche activity. Instead they are all but universal in Australians' lives. There's no need to be embarrassed about how we find them inherently valuable, and part of a better life. Rupert Myer Chair Australia Council for the Arts The Arts in Daily Life: Australian Participation in the Arts report and fact sheets can be found here: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/resources/reports_and_publications/subjects/audiences_and_cultural_participation/arts-participation  This opinion piece first ran in The Daily Review on Friday, 11 July.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (84.3 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-07-23 Visual artists to show their work on world stage Visual artists to show their work on world stage Australia Council Visual Arts Director Julie Lomax said the grant provided up to $50,000 to visual artists who had been invited to present their artwork in a major international venue or event to create new work. “The Australia Council provides support to Australian artists so they can participate in significant international opportunities through our grants and initiatives.” Ms Lomax said. “Assisting Australian artists to exhibit overseas is important as it introduces their work to a wide and diverse audience, including important curators, administrators and other artists from around the world. “This can lead to ongoing and significant collaborations, exhibition opportunities and valuable critical dialogue about an artists’ practice.” The five artists to receive the Creative Australia New Work grant are: Nicholas Mangan (Vic), Daniel Crooks (Vic), Tracey Moffatt (NSW) and Ken and Julia Yonetani (NSW). Ms Lomax said Nicholas would create filmic works and installations focusing on the sun, which would be solar powered. They will be exhibited at Chisenhale Gallery, London in July 2015 and later at Artspace, Sydney. Chisenhale Gallery director Polly Staple was introduced to Nicholas’s work in 2013 through the Mercosul Biennial in Brazil and visited him in the studio when she was undertaking research at Melbourne’s Gertrude Contemporary. “Nicholas is one of Australia’s most important artists to have emerged on the international art scene in recent years,” Ms Staple said. “His work combines a distinctive formal enquiry into sculpture and film with precise cultural and historic references, which resonates across myriad spheres. “I am delighted to be able to support Nicholas and the production and presentation of this new work, in partnership with Artspace Sydney, and bring this work to new audiences through offering him an international platform at Chisenhale.” Daniel will create a new sculptural work for Ars Electronica, Austria, which will be held in September. “Arts Electronica is one of the world’s premier digital media arts festivals, so it is very exciting for Daniel to be asked to exhibit there,” Ms Lomax said. “He normally works in film, but for this exhibition he is expanding his arts practice to create a series of sculptures.” “He normally works in film, but Tracey’s project, ART CALLS, is a 28 minute pilot for a TV show. Its premiere will form part of a major Australian solo show and then screen at Artpace in San Antonio, Texas next year.or this exhibition he is expanding his arts practice to create a series of sculptures.” “Tracey is an artist at the cutting edge of her craft and her work was recognised in 2012 at the Australia Council’s Visual Arts Awards. The ART CALLS project will be a live TV show featuring Tracey interviewing other artists about their work and lives, which she hopes will become a regular series,” Ms Lomax said. Ken and Julia will create new installations using uranium glass and salt for a solo exhibition at L’abbaye de Maubuisson, site d’art contemporain in Paris. The show will open on 25 November this year. Applications are now open for the Australia Council’s Visual Arts Fellowships and the Visual Arts Awards. Applications close 31 July. For more information go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/artforms/visual-arts   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-08-09 Vale Peter Sculthorpe Composer’s distinctive voice took Australian music to the world Australian composer Peter Sculthorpe has passed away after a long illness. He was 85. Dr Sculthorpe was born in Launceston, Tasmania in 1929. He attended Launceston Church Grammar School, The University of Melbourne and Wadham College. His distinguished career extended to working with generations of Australian composers in a succession of academic positions around the world, including Yale University, Sussex University, and, in particular, his longstanding professorship at the University of Sydney. Dr Sculthorpe’s works evoke his passion for the Australian landscape and its proximity to Asia. His commitment to human rights is evident in such works as Requiem (2003) and String Quartet no. 16 (2006). His is perhaps best known for the orchestral work Sun Music (1965), which searched for an idiomatically Australian sound, in particular its vast open spaces. He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1977 and Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in 1990. He was chosen as one of Australia’s 100 Living Treasures  in 1997, Honorary Foreign Life Member (American Academy of Arts and Letters) in 2003 and holds many international honorary doctorates. Dr Sculthorpe was awarded the Australia Council Don Banks Music Award in 2007. Australia Council Chief Executive Officer, Tony Grybowski, has paid tribute to Dr Sculthorpe. “Peter Sculthorpe took Australian music to the world. His work speaks to an identity formed by its relationship to Australian and Indigenous culture, identity and place." The Australia Council extends its deepest condolences to Dr Sculthorpe’s family, friends and colleagues. 2014-08-18 A new horizon for arts funding The Australia Council for the Arts has announced the most significant change to its grants model in the organisation’s 40 year history. Australia Council Chief Executive Tony Grybowski said the new grants model, to be implemented from January 2015, would enable an increasingly diverse range of artists and organisations to apply for funding towards the creation of excellent work and a wide range of arts activity. “With five grant programs, streamlined criteria, and opportunities to apply for multiple stages of a project in one application, we have made it simpler and easier to apply for funding. We want to encourage ambitious projects and see more audiences captivated by work that inspires and challenges,” Mr Grybowski said. “This is an artist-centric grants model which positively reflects extensive input from the sector, particularly through the Australia Council Review. The review identified that while our grant programs had served the arts well in the past, it needed to evolve with the sector and be more responsive to the new ways art is being made and presented.” Peer assessment remains central to grant decisions, and the new model ensures that the Council can draw on a large and diverse pool of experts from the sector. The new model is more transparent and efficient, allowing the Council to be more responsive to changing artistic practice and providing greater accessibility through multiple application rounds with standardised closing dates each year. The new grants model will consist of five programs: Development grants for individuals and groups valued at between $5,000 and $25,000. Arts project grants for individuals and groups valued at between $10,000 and $50,000. Arts project grants for organisations valued at between $10,000 and $150,000. Fellowships valued at $100,000. Six year funding for arts organisations. Broader categories focusing on development and projects mean only one application is required to fund a project through various stages of the creative process. The new model also ensures that individuals or groups of artists are not competing with arts organisations. Artists and arts organisations will benefit from increased stability through six year organisational funding, building greater capacity to develop and plan artistically vibrant programs which engage national and international audiences. Organisations and individuals will also have the opportunity to apply for project funding for up to three years. The Council will continue to recognise exceptional emerging and established artists through our awards and deliver a suite of grant programs on behalf of the Government. The Council will be visiting every state and territory to share information about the new grants model and engage in dialogue with the sector so that any refinements can be made before applications open in January 2015. For more information on the new funding model or the information sessions go to 2015.australiacouncil.gov.au or call 02 9215 9000, Tollfree 1800 226 912, NRS 1800 555 677. Read the new grants model program fact sheet here.    Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-08-18 A culturally ambitious nation The Australia Council has released a bold vision for the arts which will see artists creating more new and daring work, expanded audiences here and abroad captivated by Australian art, and greater recognition that the arts enrich everyday life. Today the Australia Council launched its five-year Strategic Plan and new grants model at the Sydney Opera House. The Attorney General and Minister for the Arts, Senator the Honourable George Brandis QC and the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Julie Bishop MP were joined by more than 250 people from across Australia’s arts sector as well as many more via a national live stream. Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM said the plan expressed the Council’s aspirations for Australia’s cultural ambitions which can only be realised in partnership with artists, government, organisations and the diverse communities of our nation. “This plan reflects our ambition to make more visible the vitality of our arts and culture, and to recognise the evolving way that Australians make and experience art, from galleries, theatres and studios to dry river beds, beaches and virtual spaces,” Mr Myer said. Informed by sustained dialogue with the sector the Strategic Plan articulates the Australia Council’s role as the national arts agency to champion and invest in Australian arts. The Strategic Plan articulates four priority areas for the Council over the next five years:  Australian arts are without borders Australia is known for its great art and artists The arts enrich daily life for all Australians cherish Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and cultures The goals are driven by principles of exploration, reciprocity and expansion, of excellence, diversity and experimentation, and of access, leveraging and enrichment. Australia Council Chief Executive Tony Grybowski outlined the first of a number of initiatives which will see the goals come to fruition. As part of a new international arts strategy the Council will establish a world-wide network of arts managers and partners that can be accessed by Australian artists and organisations. Every Australian should be able to experience the transformative power of art, no matter where they live. The Cultural Places program will support the creation and presentation of new work, with an emphasis on community participation in regional areas. More Australians than ever before appreciate the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and culture, but too few of them have the opportunity to experience them. The Significant Works initiative will support the development of multi-art form works of scale by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and organisations. Strategic investment to support artists and organisations is fundamental to the work of the Australia Council. Also announced today was the Council’s new grants model, which will be more flexible and responsive to changing artistic practice and the evolving needs of the sector. From January 2015 artists will find it simpler and easier to apply for funding towards the creation of excellent work and a wide range of arts activity. Over the coming weeks the Council will be in conversation with the arts community about our new strategy. Further initiatives will be announced in the months that follow.For more information on the Strategic Plan go to http://2015.australiacouncil.gov.au/   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-08-27 New Australian Pavilion in Venice takes shape The two-level concrete and steel frame that forms the structure of Australia’s new pavilion in the Venice Biennale precinct is now in place. At the end of next month, black granite panels will be installed as this, the first 21st century building in the historic Giardini della Biennale, begins to take shape. “This is an important milestone for the project, and for Australian art and architecture generally,” said Australia Council Chair Rupert Myer AM. “Given that the Venice Biennale is considered one of the world’s premiere international arts events, it has always been a great privilege to be allocated a site for our national pavilion.   Australia is one of only 29 countries to have one. “Now that the new structure is in place, the simple beauty of Denton Corker Marshall’s design is coming into play.  This is a building that will truly reflect Australia’s status and significance on the world arts stage,” Mr Myer said. The pavilion presents as a black box with flexible panels that can be opened up or remain closed, as directed by exhibition needs. When completed, the two-level structure will comprise an entrance foyer and exhibition gallery as well as back-of-house and storage areas.  The gallery will be a neutral space with polished concrete floors and five metre high walls. Describing the design concept, architect John Denton says, “Our idea is simply to create an object which sits confidently and powerfully within the historic Giardini landscape. “As architects, we are always striving to add visual interest. In this instance, we have reorientated the main entrance of the pavilion so it is now facing the Rio del Giardini canal, offering a visible, high profile façade from a number of vantage points.” The 330 metre square building is already attracting attention in Italy. Alessandro Alessandri from SICOP, who is leading the joint venture for the construction of the pavilion, says, “We were surprised that Australia was given permission to build such a contemporary building in Venice.  However, one must say that within the context of the Giardini della Biennale, which is a particular area of Venice dedicated to the world of art, the Australian Pavilion can be seen as a work of modern art. The pavilion is also the result of the evolution of technology in construction. There is nothing comparable on the island of Venice." The $7.5 million project has been funded primarily through donations from private benefactors, in addition to a contribution of $1 million from the Australian Government through the Australia Council. “It was always an ambitious idea, to build a new building in an historic European city that is surrounded by water.  But the realisation of this beautiful new pavilion, which will stand large and proud in this prestigious international environment, says a lot about our cultural ambition as a nation,” Mr Myer said. “I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank Simon Mordant AM, Australian Commissioner for the 2013 and 2015 Venice Biennales, who has himself pledged a family donation of $2 million towards the project, and has worked tirelessly to make the building project come to fruition. The Australian Pavilion project is a great example of how the private and public sector can work together to achieve great cultural outcomes.”   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB) Download background information for media as a PDF (110 KB)   Contact Karen Hall | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 0421 153 046 | Email kathall@ozemail.com.au 2014-08-27 Award-winning exhibition on graphic music scores now on at the Australia Council The award-winning, all Australian survey of graphic notation practice, Drawn From Sound, is now on display at The Australia Council for the Arts in Sydney. The exhibition and its curator, Perth composer and sound artist Cat Hope, last night received the Excellence in Experimental Music prize at the 2014 Art Music Awards in Melbourne. Australia Council Acting Music Director Andy Rantzen said the exhibition included examples of graphic notation in a variety of forms by 20 Australian composers, including Percy Grainger, Anita Hustas, Warren Burt, David Young and Amanda Stewart.  Work by Cat Hope, who is this year’s recipient of the Australia Council’s Peggy Glanville-Hicks residency, is also featured. “The Australia Council is proud to support diverse artistic work through our various grants and initiatives, as well as exhibitions here at Council, so artists can showcase their innovative work to the arts sector and the community,” Mr Rantzen said. “Drawn From Sound will provide visitors with a good understanding of the history of Australian experimental music as well as artists working in the new music sector today.” Mr Rantzen said graphic music scores were different to traditional scores as the music notation was represented in a variety of forms – visual symbols, objects, videos, photographs, paintings and machines. “This is often found in experimental music as it allows for greater freedom of expression for the composer and musician than in traditional music notation.” Ms Hope said Australians were leading the way in experimenting with alternatives to traditional music notation and the exhibition included examples of early to more recent experiments of different ways to represent sound. “Coming directly from my own interest and use of graphic notation, this eclectic collection from established and emerging Australian artists represents some of the approaches for music scoring employed today,” Ms Hope said. “As a composer using graphic notation myself, I was interested in finding and showing what other Australians have done and are currently doing in the field of graphic notation. “There is a wide range of different approaches to making music scores, from photographs, paintings and assemblages to digital solutions. “My recent Churchill Fellowship travels across Europe and the USA demonstrated to me that Australia is at the forefront of experimenting with alternatives to traditional music notation and this selection just skims the surface.” As part of the exhibition free talks on graphic score notation will be held at the Australia Council. Dr David Sudmalis will speak about approaches to notation and the essence of graphic scores on 4 September at 2pm.  Cat Hope will outline the nature of the works in the exhibition on 2 October at 2pm. Drawn From Sound will run until 4 November at the Australia Council for the Arts’ Rover Thomas Auditorium at 372 Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills.  It will be open to the public from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday and entry is free. Drawn From Sound was first presented in 2013 at SpECtrUm Project Space at the Edith Cowan University in Western Australia with assistance from the New Music Network and Tura New Music.     Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB) or HTML (37KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-08-28 British Council’s ACCELERATE programme for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the creative industries Announcing the outstanding four recipients of ACCELERATE 2014 Rupert Myer announces extended support from the Australia Council for the Arts –$355,700 over three years Wesley Enoch’s rousing keynote The 2014 recipients of ACCELERATE – the British Council’s annual leadership award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People – were announced today, at a special event held at Melbourne Museum’s Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre. The four recipients of this year’s programme, who were chosen from a national call-out, are: Jacob Boehme – a dancer/choreographer, theatre-maker and writer from Victoria Clotilde Bullen – a visual arts curator from Western Australia Carly Lane – a visual arts curator and arts advocate from Western Australia Lucy Simpson – a designer of textiles and home wares from New South Wales. The four ACCELERATE recipients will now move on to the first stage of ACCELERATE 2014, where they will undertake an intensive weekend with visiting UK trainer, Mark Wright of People Create. During the intensive, they will explore their own leadership more deeply and will also be connected with individual mentors who will work with them as coaches over the programme. After these sessions, the four will work in consultation with the British Council and UK-based arts consultant Nicola Turner to design their bespoke UK professional placements. The group travels to the UK for three weeks in November this year. At the event, Chair of the Australia Council for the Arts Rupert Myer AM announced extended three-year support to expand the ACCELERATE programme from 2014-16, totaling $355,700. This will see: (1) an international leadership symposium led by ACCELERATE alumni in 2015 and 2016; (2) opportunity for ACCELERATE alumni to build artistic collaboration with the UK and; (3) increased mentoring and leadership training for ACCELERATE participants. Rupert Myer said, “An expanded ACCELERATE delivers across the spectrum of goals defined in our new Strategic Plan for a Culturally Ambitious Nation. We recognise that supporting leaders of the future is critical to the continued development of vibrant and inspiring communities. ACCELERATE is an important platform for our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts leaders to drive the dialogue on Australian arts, locally and internationally. The Australia Council is very pleased to support ACCELERATE and its work in cultural leadership development.” The event was a celebration, hosted by NITV News presenter Natalie Ahmat and featuring amusical performance by Melbourne’s Skin Choir. Queensland Theatre Company Artistic Director and Chair of the Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Strategy Panel Wesley Enoch delivered a rousing keynote speech, which built on issues raised in his recently published Platform Papers essay, Take Me to Your Leader: the Dilemma of Cultural Leadership. In his speech, Enoch said that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people “occupy a unique position in this country.” “We have both a moral authority gifted to us through our heritage, the history of injustice and continued connection with this landscape AND we have solutions that are based on the concept of putting the arts and cultural expression in the centre of society,” Enoch said. “We express ourselves through our song, dance, storytelling, visual arts, music and craft. Our genealogy, geography, history, economy, legal system and sense of community come from expressing ourselves through the arts. ”ACCELERATE 2014 is presented by the British Council and the Australia Council for the Arts in partnership with Arts NSW, Arts Victoria, Department of Culture and the Arts WA, technology and communications partner BT Global  Services, transport partner British Airways, and media partner SBS NITV. Further information at www.accelerate.org.au For more information, photographs and interview opportunities, contact: Ben Starick, Starling Communications 0411 029 393 ben@starling.com.au ABOUT THIS YEAR’S RECIPIENTS Carly Lane, WA Carly Lane is a member of the Kalkadoon people of north-west Queensland  and an independent art curator based in Perth. Lane specialises in Aboriginal art and anthropology and has over 15 years’ experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, art collections and exhibitions in Perth as well as nationally. Lane has worked as a curator and researcher at a number of local, state and national institutions, including the Berndt Museum of Anthropology, The University of Western Australia, the Art Gallery of Western Australia and the National Museum and National Gallery of Australia. She was the inaugural curator of the Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards and the curator of the second National Indigenous Art Triennial. Carly Lane continues to serve on various local/state/national boards and committees, including the Indigenous Art Code. As an independent curator, Lane works on an assortment of art projects, including co-guest editing the annual edition of Artlink Indigenous Art, 2014. Lane has a First Class Honours in Anthropology and was the first Indigenous graduand to present the Valedictory Address at The University of Western Australia in 2003. Lane continues in her pursuit of knowledge by researching and writing a PhD in anthropology about Aboriginal identity and art. Jacob Boehme, Vic Jacob Boehme is a Narangga/Kaurna man, descendant of the peoples of South Australia. He trained in traditional Aboriginal/ Torres Strait Island and contemporary dance at NAISDA College and holds Post Graduate and Masters Degrees in Puppetry (Victorian College of the Arts), trained by influential masters of visual theatre: Philippe Genty, Peter J. Wilson, RonnieBurkett and Mummenschanz. Jacob is now studying a Masters in Writing for Performance at the Victorian College of the Arts. Choreographic credits include the Hamer Hall Opening Concert 2012, Thuwathu Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair 2011, Lu’arn Melbourne Indigenous Arts Festival, Tanderrum Melbourne Festival 2013, as well as Dreamtime at the G 2011 – 2013. In 2011, Jacob founded IDJA, a Melbourne based Indigenous dance theatre and in 2012, premiered its first major production Lu’arn: a contemporary envisioning of an ancient Boon Wurrung Lore story, at the inaugural Melbourne Indigenous Arts Festival. Jacob also provides professional and skills development for Traditional dance groups. Jacob’s work with the Mornington Island Dancers led to the haunting traditional dance and puppetryperformance of Thuwathu – Death of the Rainbow Serpent, for the Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair in 2011. Jacob is now embarking on his first solo performance Blood on the Dance Floor (BOTDF), produced by ILBIJERRI Theatre Company. BOTDF is a contemporary text-based dance work, illuminating the experience of living with a chronic illness, in particular: living with and  Indigenous attitudes toward HIV. Jacob is now Writer in Residence at ILBIJERRI, commissioned to write a new full-length play, Flash Blaks. Clotilde Bullen, WA Clotilde Bullen is a Wardandi (Nyoongar) and French/English woman from the south-west of Western Australia.  She has held the position of Curator of Indigenous Art at the Art Gallery of Western Australia since 2005 and since that time has curated 13 exhibitions, written numerous in-house catalogues and acquired significant artworks for the State Art Collection. Clotilde also writes for external publications, including Artlink: Contemporary Art of Asia and the Asia Pacific, and has conducted many lectures and talks, most recently as part of Next wave Festival’s Blak Wave programme. Clotilde is a strong advocate for the Nyoongar and wider visual arts communities, seeking to empower arts workers in the visual arts industry, by being aware, responsive, inspirational and knowledgable. Clotilde has also served on the development committee for the National Gallery and  Wesfarmers Indigenous Arts Fellowship and was part of the national Indigenous curatorial lobby group to the Kemp Inquiry to introduce legislation for resale royalties for Indigenous artists. Lucy Simpson, NSW Lucy Simpson is a Yuwaalaraay woman based in Sydney. Lucy studied at UNSW College of Fine Arts [COFA] and is the founder of design house and home wares/accessories label, Gaawaa Miyay. Through her contemporary work in textiles and graphics, Lucy uses visual narratives and story to connect share and celebrate. A graduate of the College of Fine Arts, Lucy is passionate about all aspects of thoughtful practical and sustainable Aboriginal design and visual storytelling. Through her own practice, community programs, industry events and public forums, Lucy lives to share her experience and insight into the beautiful, sophisticated and intriguing world of Indigenous design and contemporary Aboriginal culture.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-09-10 Richard Flanagan shortlisted for the 2014 Man Booker Prize The Australia Council congratulates Australian author Richard Flanagan on being shortlisted for the most prestigious literary prize internationally - the 2014 Man Booker Prize for his novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North. Read more about the shortlisted authors for the 2014 Man Booker Prize for Fiction here.  2014-09-11 Kickstart your art career with ArtStart Emerging artists can kickstart their career with a grant of up to $10,000 from the Australia Council. Australia Council Director Early Career Artists and Arts and Education Dr David Sudmalis said applications were now open for the ArtStart grant, which was available to recent creative arts graduates to support a career or business development strategy for their arts practice. “The Australia Council started the ArtStart program in 2009 to provide financial assistance for young artists wanting to establish a career as a professional artist,” Dr Sudmalis said. “Since the program began, the Australia Council has awarded just over 1,000 grants to emerging artists. “Some of the previous recipients who have benefitted from the program include flautist Lina Andonovska, writer Demet Divaroren and visual artist Becc Orszag. “ArtStart funding can be used for services, resources, skills development and equipment to help establish an income-generating career in the artform they have studied. “To be eligible, applicants must be committed to building a career as a professional writer, visual, hybrid or performing artist or a creative practitioner working in community arts or cultural development. “They also need to present a viable plan outlining their proposed ArtStart activities, demonstrate their artistic potential and display a commitment to their chosen field.” Previous ArtStart recipients include jazz guitarist Harry Edwards (Tas), visual artist Alica Bryson-Haynes (Vic), visual artist and photographer Alex Bishop-Thorpe (SA), and visual and performance artist Hannah Raisin (Vic). “Harry is using his ArtStart grant to receive guitar tuition in the niche style Jazz Manouche from experts in North America and France,” Dr Sudmalis said. “He will also buy a Jazz Manouche instrument from Europe, which is not available in Australia.” “Alicia is currently in Mexico researching and networking with local and international artists and working on a new project. “ArtStart has also enabled her to set up a studio in Melbourne and buy equipment for her practice. “Alex has used his grant to learn new techniques and meet other artists through a month-long residency at the Banff Centre in Canada and a workshop at George Eastman House in Rochester, New York. “Hannah used some of her grant to present at a forum at the Queensland University of Technology during the Brisbane Festival.  This led to her work being shown in two exhibitions in Brisbane, one in Adelaide and a residency on a farm in Cooran, Queensland. “She used the rest of her grant to establish a studio, buy camera equipment and take short courses.” ArtStart applications close on 22 September. The grant supports the professional development of recent graduates and cannot be used to fund the creation of new work or to develop one-off performances or exhibitions. For more information and to apply go to: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/grants/2014/artstart4   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-09-23 Australia Council supports four Primavera artists The Australia Council for the Arts has supported four emerging artists to make new work for Primavera 2014, which opens next week at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney. Australia Council Director Visual Arts Julie Lomax said the four young artists – Ben Denham, Hossein Ghaemi, Emily Hunt and Marian Tubbs - had submitted innovative and creative proposals and she was looking forward to seeing the finished product at the exhibition. “The Australia Council is proud to support young artists to create new work and participate in events like Primavera, which has become an important platform to gain exposure and recognition in the visual arts scene,” Ms Lomax said. “The Australia Council is about supporting the life of the artist and we have supported many in previous years to exhibit at Primavera. “A number of these artists have gone on to become respected contributors to the Australian visual arts, including Eric Bridgeman, Michaela Gleave and Hiromi Tango. “It is particularly exciting to see Mikala Dwyer, who featured in the inaugural Primavera in 1992, chosen as curator of this year’s exhibition.  The Australia Council recognised her talent more than 20 years ago when she received her first grant and we have continued to support her work, as recently as this year. ”Ms Dwyer said she travelled extensively throughout Australia to curate this year’s exhibition and viewed the work of many brilliant young artists. “When I think through the work of the artists I’ve selected for Primavera all sorts of ideas, interest and associations pop up, including surrealism, robotics, queer fertility, ritual, time, witchcraft, science, alchemy, dreaming and telepathy,” Ms Dwyer said. For Primavera 2014 Ben Denham has created a new friction-based control system for a tri-axis motorised drawing machine, which includes a custom laser system.  The laser will burn marks onto paper and provide a precise translation of time into line. Hossein Ghaemi’s practice involves painting, installation and costumed choral performance work.  As a Persian artist he is also interested in how the voice can represent spiritual acts and rituals. For the exhibition he has directed three video installations of choral performance works, with the assistance of a cinematographer and video editor. Emily Hunt’s work focuses on her interest in the grotesque and the history and aesthetics of German Renaissance print-making and social caricature. For the exhibition she has used two mediums – ceramics on deep mirrored shelving winding through the gallery and collaged watercolours in mirror box frames to create two-sided Janus heads to be viewed in 360 degrees. Marian Tubbs has expanded on her practice of material poetics that address living in late capitalism. She has created a sprawling installation of digital collages and functionless objects that result from industrial metal and plastic processes pushed experimentally beyond limits. The work will question: what is a thing of industry and what is a thing of art? Primavera is an annual exhibition for Australian artists aged 35 and under.  It was founded in 1992 by Dr Edward Jackson AM and Mrs Cynthia Jackson AM and their family in memory of their daughter Belinda, a talented jeweller who died aged 29. Primavera 2014 runs from 23 September until 30 November at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB)   Contact Karen Smith | Australia Council for the ArtsPhone 9215 9030 | Email k.smith@australiacouncil.gov.au 2014-09-29 Australia Council announces Fiona Hall’s exhibition for the 2015 Venice Biennale Fiona Hall Wrong Way Time Fiona Hall AO will represent Australia at the 56th Venice Biennale with Wrong Way Time, an installation that brings together hundreds of multi-part works from this renowned artist’s prolific practice. The artist’s love of nature and with things ‘counter and strange’, coupled with an eye for the foibles of human nature, will underlie this multi-layered examination of three intersecting concerns: global politics, finances and the environment. In common with many of us, Hall sees in these failed states ‘a minefield of madness, badness, sadness, in equal measure’, stretching beyond the foreseeable future. “Wrong Way Time will be a rich, archaeological display that imagines and embodies some of the issues and fluctuations of our time,” says curator Linda Michael. “Though Hall responds to the perilous state of the environment or shared anxieties about the future, her exhibition will be life-affirming, its own vitality in perverse distinction to the subjects it ranges across.” Wrong Way Time will be the first exhibition to be held in Australia’s new pavilion, designed by architecture firm Denton Corker Marshall.  Funded primarily through donations from private benefactors, in addition to a contribution of $1 million from the Australian Government through the Australia Council, the pavilion is currently under construction and is the first twenty-first century pavilion to be built within the Biennale’s historic Giardini precinct. "The combination of the new Australian Pavilion, which is well advanced, and Fiona Hall's ambitious exhibition, will mean 2015 will be a very important year for Australia at the Venice Biennale.  I’ve no doubt that our presence will attract global attention. Australia will be the must-see pavilion,” says Simon Mordant AM, Commissioner for Australia, Venice Biennale 2015. Fiona Hall: Wrong Way Time and the new Australian Pavilion will be launched in early May 2015, during the opening preview days of this, the most prestigious biennale on the international contemporary arts calendar.   Formats This media release can be downloaded as a PDF (110 KB), DOC (63KB)   Contact Katrina Hall Phone: 0421 153 046 Email: kathall@ozemail.com.au