Arts Nation is the home for the Australia Council’s research and knowledge management. In 2015 the Australia Council published Arts Nation: An overview of Australian arts, establishing a set of indicators and measures of arts and culture in Australia. In 2017 Arts Nation became an interactive web presence. Online, Arts Nation continues and expands the work of the original publication, presenting the full range of Australia Council research in an interactive and accessible format.ABOUT

Latest Research

Graphic Storytellers at Work: Cross-industry opportunities for cartoonists, illustrators and comics-makers

Graphic storytellers make complex ideas easy to understand. Their technical and interpretive skills help to illustrate abstract concepts and transcend language barriers. So, we’ve commissioned Graphic Storytellers at Work: Cross-industry opportunities for cartoonists, illustrators and comics-makers, a new report which explores how the skills of cartoonists, illustrators and comics-makers are being applied. This happens across a diverse range of industries such as health and education.

Artists surveyed described using their skills to communicate important health information to culturally diverse communities, translate complex legal documents, or create tools and resources for psychologists and surgeons.

READ MORE

COVID-19 Audience Outlook Monitor

As the COVID-19 crisis continues, the Australia Council is working with Patternmakers and WolfBrown again in 2021 to understand changes in behaviours and sentiments of arts-goers in the wake of the pandemic.

Restrictions on public gatherings and travel forced many in the arts community to shut their doors and cancel programs and activities. Throughout 2020, the Audience Outlook Monitor tracking study provided the arts and cultural sector with crucial insights to inform planning and decision-making.

Now, as doors are reopening and programming resuming, the Audience Outlook Monitor will continue to provide valuable information with three more phases in 2021. Amid the ongoing disruption of the pandemic, we will continue to track audience sentiments and behaviours as changes occur.

READ MORE

Related research

Cultivating Creativity: A study of the Sydney Opera House’s Creative Leadership in Learning Program in schools

Cultivating Creativity: A study of the Sydney Opera House’s Creative Leadership in Learning Program in schools is the result of a research partnership between the Australia Council for the Arts and Sydney Opera House. 

The report provides powerful evidence of the ways in which creative learning approaches can build confidence, improve academic engagement, positively impact the culture of a school and enhance a sense of community.   

READ MORE

The Gender Pay Gap Among Australian Artists: Some preliminary findings 

As artists, Australian women continue to earn less than their male counterparts. In the most recent comprehensive national survey of professional artists’ economic circumstances, which was undertaken in 2016-17, the total incomes of female artists were 25 percent less on average than for males, and women earned 30 percent less from their creative work. These differentials were greater than the workforce gender pay gap of 16 percent at that time.  

READ MORE

Electorate Profiles

This interactive online resource provides information on arts and culture for each of Australia’s 151 federal electorates. Choose an electorate from a drop-down menu or map to display targeted information on arts engagement, ticket buying behaviour and creative and cultural businesses and employment.

READ MORE

Explore Research

By Art form

Recent Research Highlights

Making Art Work: An Economic Study of Professional Artists in Australia by David Throsby and Katya Petetskaya is the sixth in a series carried out independently over thirty years by Professor Throsby at Macquarie University, with funding from the Australia Council. The series tracks trends in the lives and working conditions of Australian artists over 30 years and identifies challenges and opportunities for artists’ careers into the future.

For the first time the Council has produced a companion report which provides a summary and response to the artist survey. Making Art Work: A summary and response by the Australia Council for the Arts places the findings alongside other literature and analysis to explore the wider context for Australian artists.

READ MORE

CREATING OUR FUTURE
WEBINARS
ARC LINKAGE

CREATING OUR FUTURE


Creating Our Future: Results of the National Arts Participation Survey is the fourth study in the landmark research series that explores Australians’ engagement with and attitudes towards the arts.

The National Arts Participation Survey asks how Australians are engaging with arts and creativity in our daily lives. How do Australians feel about arts and creativity? How is our arts engagement changing? Do we recognise the impacts of arts and creativity in our lives and communities? How do Australians feel about public funding for the arts?

READ MORE

WEBINARS

Spotlight on economic value and future success

As the cornerstone of our evidence base, the Creating Our Future: Results of the National Arts Participation Survey provides vital new evidence about the essential role that arts and creativity play in Australian communities, showing the arts are a public good infused and embedded in the fabric of our daily lives.

READ MORE

ARC LINKAGE

ARC Linkage: Making Music work: Sustainable Portfolio Careers for Australian Musician

The Australian study Making Music Work: Sustainable Portfolio Careers for Australian Musicians (2016-2019) explored the conditions and strategies needed for musicians to sustain successful portfolio careers.

The vast majority of Australian musicians undertake a portfolio career which encompasses a variety of concurrent and often impermanent roles. While this is not a new phenomenon, major shifts in how music is made, paid for and consumed, as well as a changing commercial, funding, educational and policy landscape, all impact how musicians currently develop and sustain their careers.

READ MORE